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White People Playing Latino Actors on Broadway is a Thing of the Past

Gloria and Emilio Estefan’s new play on Broadway, On Your Feet!, is bringing more Latino actors into the theater. This is a BIG deal — huge even — because for the better part of Broadway’s history, Latino actors were almost non existent.

“In the past, shows were written about Hispanics (West Side Story), but not by Hispanics,” as Raul Reyes writes for NBC News. “Nor was it unusual for a show with Latino characters not to hire any actual Latino actors.”

¿Qué, qué? That’s correct. And since ticket have generally been on the pricey side for these Latino plays sans Latinos, Latino audiences weren’t exactly rushing to grab a seat.

Luckily, with On Your Feet! and other plays featuring Latinos, like Hamilton, this is only the beginning for because we now see Broadway “can’t control itself any longer.”

Read more about Latinos on Broadway here.

READ: 13 Places that Prove NYC has a Latino Heartbeat

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Thalía, Alejandra Gúzman, Anitta And More Lined-Up for ‘Ellas y Su Música’ Mother’s Day Special

Latidomusic

Thalía, Alejandra Gúzman, Anitta And More Lined-Up for ‘Ellas y Su Música’ Mother’s Day Special

In honor of Mother’s Day this year, the Latin Recording Academy is putting on a concert filled with superstar Latinas. Mexican icon Thalía is set to host the Ellas y Su Música special with women like Alejandra Gúzman, Gloria Estefan, and Anitta scheduled to perform.

The Latin Recording Academy and Univision are teaming up for the special.

The Latin Recording Academy hosts the Latin Grammy Awards every year. Ellas y Su Música will air Sunday, May 9 at 8 p.m. EST on Univision. This will be a two-hour-long program that celebrates women.

“For the first time on television, The Latin Recording Academy and Univision will celebrate the journey of women in music through a television special,” reads a statement for the special. “Legends, icons, and rising artists will gather to celebrate those who paved the way and inspired new generations through unforgettable musical performances and never-before-told personal stories.”

The performers include many Latina legends in music.

The list of performers so far confirmed for Ellas y Su Música is mind-blowing. Along with the aforementioned Estefan, Gúzman, and Anitta, they will be joined by Olga Tañon, Yuri, La India, and Shaila Durcal. Puerto Rican and openly queer star Kany García, ChocQuibTown’s Goyo, Mon Laferte, and Chiquis Rivera are also performing.

There’s also many rising stars slated to perform.

Not only are the stars and icons performing that night, but so are the rising artists. Among that group is Mexican pop star Sofía Reyes, who starred with Thalía in Latin Music Queens, Argentina’s Latin trap queen Cazzu, and Dominican-American singer Leslie Grace.

There are still more performers to be announced. There’s never been so much Latina star power in one show before. Ellas y Su Música will be an all-star special to enjoy with mamá and la abuela en la casa.

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

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From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

Things That Matter

From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

One of the big surprises of the 2020 election was how even though most Latino voters across the U.S. voted for Joe Biden, in some counties of competitive states like Florida and Texas, a higher-than-expected percentage of Latinos supported Donald Trump. One factor that many believe played a role: online misinformation about the Democratic candidate.

Another important subject that’s been victim of a massive misinformation campaign is the Coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing vaccination program. But why does #fakenews so heavily target the Latino community?

Since the 2020 campaign, a large misinformation campaign has target Latinos.

Although fake news is nothing new, in the campaign leading up to the 2020 elections it morphed into something more sinister – a campaign to influence Latino voters with false information. The largely undetected movement helped depress turnout and spread disinformation about Democrat Joe Biden.

The effort showed how social media and other technology can be leveraged to spread misinformation so quickly that those trying to stop it cannot keep up. There were signs that it worked as Donald Trump swung large numbers of Latino votes in the 2020 presidential race in some areas that had been Democratic strongholds.

Videos and pictures were doctored. Quotes were taken out of context. Conspiracy theories were fanned, including that voting by mail was rigged, that the Black Lives Matter movement had ties to witchcraft and that Biden was beholden to a cabal of socialists.

That flow of misinformation has only intensified since Election Day, researchers and political analysts say, stoking Trump’s baseless claims that the election was stolen and false narratives around the mob that overran the Capitol. More recently, it has morphed into efforts to undermine vaccination efforts against the coronavirus.

The misinformation campaign could have major impacts on our politics.

Several misinformation researchers say there is an alarming amount of misinformation about voter fraud and Democratic leaders being shared in Latino social media communities. Biden is a popular target, with misinformation ranging from exaggerated claims that he embraces Fidel Castro-style socialism to more patently false and outlandish ones, for instance that the president-elect supports abortion minutes before a child’s birth or that he orchestrated a caravan of Cuban immigrants to infiltrate the US Southern border and disrupt the election process.

Democratic strategists looking ahead to the 2022 midterm elections are concerned about how this might sway Latino voters in the future. They acknowledge that conservatives in traditional media and the political establishment have pushed false narratives as well, but say that social media misinformation deserves special attention: It appears to be a growing problem, and it can be hard to track and understand.

Some believe that Latinos may be more likely to believe a message shared by friends, family members, or people from their cultural community in a WhatsApp or Telegram group rather than an arbitrary mainstream US news outlet; research has found that people believe news articles more when they’re shared by people they trust.

Fake news is also impacting our community’s response to the pandemic.

Vaccination programs work best when as many people as possible get vaccinated, but Latinos in the United States are getting inoculated at lower rates.

In Florida, for example, Latinos are 27% of the population but they’ve made up only about 17% of COVID-19 vaccinations so far, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. And Latinos are relying on social media and word-of-mouth for information on vaccines — even when it’s wrong. There’s myths circulating around the vaccine, whether you can trust it and the possible the long-term effects.

And it’s not just obstacles to getting information in Spanish, but also in many of the native Mayan indigenous languages that farmworkers speak in South Florida.

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