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Latina Says She Was Humiliated by Airport Employee Because Her Mom Doesn’t Speak English

Rosmila Gonzalez Negrin, a Venezuelan-American who lives in Texas, recently posted an emotional Facebook video accusing an American Airlines employee of treating her poorly because her mother didn’t speak English.

In the video, Gonzalez Negrin explains that every year, she asks for permission to accompany her mother through the gate before her mother boards the plane. She noted that it wasn’t an issue until recently:

“On this occasion, the person who helped me, well, it seems like she was a follower of Donald Trump or maybe she watches a lot of television or… I don’t know. Maybe she woke up in a bad mood. But this is the first time in 15 years of my life that I have lived in this country … that something like this has happened to me.”

 
 

Credit: Rosmila Gonzalez Negrin / Facebook

Gonzalez Negrin then breaks down what happened:

“This lady, when I asked for a pass to enter with my mom because my mom doesn’t speak English, the lady kept staring at my mom and said, ‘She’s perfectly fine and can go by herself.'”

“I told the lady, ‘It’s that every year, every time my mom comes, I take her to the gate because she gets nervous. She’s an elderly woman. She’s older than 65, that’s why I’m asking you to please let me go through with her.'”

Credit: Rosmila Gonzalez Negrin / Facebook

Gonzalez Negrin said the employee took her ID and kept staring at her mother. So she continued to explain her situation:

“I told her, ‘My mom doesn’t speak English. So to find the correct gate, sit down and talk to people in Houston is a bit tough for her.'”

Gonzalez Negrin says was unprepared for the cynical response she got from the employee: That’s strange, because most people around the world speak English.”

Credit: Rosmila Gonzalez Negrin / Facebook

Gonzalez Negrin replied: “Well, yeah, that’s strange because my mom lives in Venezuela, and she speaks Spanish, not English.”

She then asked the airport employee: “With all due respect, do you speak Spanish?”

The employee replied: “No. As a matter of fact, I don’t. I don’t need to speak Spanish. I live in America, so I don’t need to speak Spanish.”

Gonzalez Negrin says she replied, “Well, you’ve just made my point. My mom lives in Venezuela, and she doesn’t need to speak English. That’s why she doesn’t speak English.”

Credit: Rosmila Gonzalez Negrin / Facebook

Gonzalez Negrin says the employee then gave her a pass to enter the gate and once she was in line with her mother, she grabbed the pass and tore it in her face, telling her “Let’s see how you get in.”

What happened afterward? Nothing: “It’s that simple. She didn’t let me in.”

Gonzalez Negrin, who believes Donald Trump is creating an anti-Latino environment in the US, says she believes Latinos should value their worth and speak up whenever they feel discrimination: “All Latinos are worth something, from those of us who are engineers who work at refineries to those who work at McDonalds, clean houses or take care of children. We are all valuable.”

 
 

Watch full video:

Q se haga viral

Posted by Rosmila Gonzalez Negrin on Thursday, September 10, 2015

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Venezuelan Rising Star Carmen DeLeon Talks Break-Up Inspired “Pasado” and How Her Abuelos Inspired “Cafecito”

Latidomusic

Venezuelan Rising Star Carmen DeLeon Talks Break-Up Inspired “Pasado” and How Her Abuelos Inspired “Cafecito”

Carmen De Leon is a rising star hailing from Caracas, Venezuela. The 20-year-old singer moved to Tampa, Florida when she was 10 years old and then two years later moved with her family to Barcelona, Spain and lived there for six years. While in Spain, Carmen found success participating in La Voz, and started to build a following that would tune in every week to see her perform. Then she lived in Mexico for a year, Los Angeles for another year and is now settled in Miami working on her music career.

In an exclusive interview with Latido Music by mitú, Carmen De Leon talked to us about her latest single “Pasado” with Cali y El Dandee, from which she drew inspiration from her very own break-up and reminiscing about the past. We also touched on “Cafecito“, the bittersweet song in memory of her grandparents, her dream collab, and more.

Pasado” is inspired by Carmen De Leon’s real-life breakup.

Carmen recruited Colombian singers Cali y El Dandee for her latest single “Pasado,” blending 80s synthpop with reggaeton, a true popetón hit you can dance to and perhaps cry to.

On working with Cali y El Dandee, Carmen has nothing but praise for the Colombian duo, “they are like my brothers, they’re insanely talented, genuine and humble.”

It was Dandee who actually wanted her to let her feelings all out for the song.

“At that moment while I was writing the song, I was actually breaking up with my boyfriend, and I had Mauricio (Dandee) saying to me: ‘Just tell me more. Whatever you’re texting him, say it out loud so we have the right words for the song’ and that’s what we did,” Carmen says.

Just like the lyrics of the song long about the past, so did the music video which was purposely made in the film to capture the “old vibe” they were seeking to portray.

Carmen feels like this is the best song that she has made in her entire life. “It’s changed my life in a way because it’s opened me up to new audiences and I love seeing people react to it and relate to it.”

Earlier this year, Carmen released “Cafecito” which isn’t about your beloved morning beverage.

Most of us would read the title “Cafecito” and think it’s just an upbeat morning pick-me-up song, but it isn’t. “Cafecito” is a bittersweet single that Carmen says she wrote, “at 4 a.m. in the middle of a hurricane because I missed my grandparents so much, and I wanted to write about what it feels like to lose someone.”

While her abuelitos were the main inspiration behind the lyrics, the song does capture the feeling of loss that could apply to those of us losing a friendship, relationship, etc.

Before I even finish the question about her dream collaboration, Carmen excitedly yelled “Camilo!,” which also happens to be one of her favorite covers she’s posted on her YouTube channel.

Carmen’s dad chimed in the interview as well to plug in his favorite cover, which is “Graveyard” by Halsey.

We can only hope that Carmen DeLeon and Camilo collab happens and that this article serves as manifestation for it.

Good luck with everything, Carmen!

READ: Mon Laferte Talks Regional Mexican Album ‘Seis’ and Singing With Gloria Trevi

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9-Year-Old Migrant Girl Drowns While Trying to Cross the Rio Grande in the U.S.

Things That Matter

9-Year-Old Migrant Girl Drowns While Trying to Cross the Rio Grande in the U.S.

Photo via Getty Images

On March 20th, U.S. Border Patrol agents found a 9-year-old migrant girl unresponsive along with her mother and sibling on an island in the Rio Grande.

U.S. Border Patrol agents attempted to resuscitate the family. The agents were able to revive the mother and her younger, 3-year-old child. The Border Patrol agents transferred the 9-year-old migrant girl to emergency medics in emergency medics in Eagle Pass, Texas, but she remained unresponsive.

In the end, the 9-year-old migrant girl died–the cause of death being drowning.

The mother of the two children was Guatemalan while the two children were born in Mexico.

The death of the 9-year-old migrant girl is notable because this is the first migrant child death recorded in this current migration surge. And experts worry that it won’t be the last.

And while this is the first child death, it is not the only migrant who has died trying to make it across the border. On Wednesday, a Cuban man drowned while trying to swim across the border between Tijuana and San Diego. He was the second migrant to drown in just a two-week period.

Why is this happening?

According to some reports, the reason so many migrants are heading towards the U.S. right now is “because President Trump is gone”. They believe they have a better chance of claiming asylum in the U.S.

Another factor to take into consideration is that a large number of these migrants are unaccompanied minors. According to migrant services volunteer Ruben Garcia, Title 42 is actually having the opposite effect of its intent. President Trump enacted Title 42 to prevent immigration during COVID-19 for “safety reasons”.

“Families that have been expelled multiple times that are traveling with children,” Garcia told PBS News Hour. “Some of them are making the decision to send their children in by themselves, because they have families someplace in the U.S., and they know their children will be released to them.”

Is there a “border crisis”?

That depends on who you ask. According to some experts, the numbers of migrants heading to the U.S./Mexico border aren’t out-of-the-ordinary considering the time of year and the fact that COVID-19 made traveling last year virtually impossible.

According to Tom Wong of the University of California at San Diego’s U.S. Immigration Policy Center, there is no “border crisis”. “This year looks like the usual seasonal increase, plus migrants who would have come last year but could not,” Wong says.

As the Washington Post explained: “What we’re seeing right now is a predictable seasonal shift. When the numbers drop again in June and July, policymakers may be tempted to claim that their deterrence policies succeeded.”

What is the Biden Administration planning on doing about it?

As of now, it is pretty evident that the Biden Administration has not been handling this migrant surge well, despite ample warning from experts. As of now, President Biden has put Vice President Harris in charge of handling the issues at the border.

As of now, the game plan is still very vague. But in the past, the Biden Administration has stated that they plan to fix the migrant surge at the source. That means providing more aid to Central America in order to prevent further corruption of elected officials.

They also want to put in place a plan that processes children and minors as refugees in their own countries before they travel to the U.S. The government had not tested these plans and they may take years to implement. Here’s to hoping that these changes will prevent a case like the death of the 9-year-old migrant girl.

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