Things That Matter

Chase Bank Sued For Discriminating Against Black And Latino Customers

Credit: jeepersmedia / flickr

In one of its final moves, the Obama administration hit JPMorgan Chase & Co. with a one-two punch in the form of two discrimination lawsuits: one for discriminating against black and Latino mortgage borrowers and another for discriminating against their own female employees.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the largest bank in the nation, JPMorgan Chase & Co., alleging that from 2006 to 2009 it discriminated against African Americans and Latinos by charging them higher mortgage interest rates and fees when compared to “similarly situated white borrowers.”

According to Bloomberg, on average, black borrowers paid $1,126 more in fees while Latinos paid an average of $968 more in fees when compared to white customers.

JPMorgan spokesperson Elizabeth Seymour said, “We’ve agreed to settle these legacy allegations that relate to pricing set by independent brokers. We deny any wrongdoing and remain committed to providing equal access to credit.” They settled on the same day the lawsuit was filed.

The second lawsuit against the bank was filed by the Labor Department and claims that 93 female tech employees were paid lower wages than their non-female counterparts. JPMorgan Chase & Co. isn’t settling in this case and says that they’re looking forward to getting their evidence in front of “a neutral decision maker,” which is just another way of saying, “see you in court.”

Click here to find out more about the lawsuits filed against JPMorgan Chase & Co.


READ: This Bank Was Hoping Wronged Latino Immigrants Couldn’t And Wouldn’t Speak Up

Don’t forget to give that share button below a one-two punch before you go. 

NBC Latina Correspondent Mariana Atencio Says She Was Told Not To Dress ‘Too Latina’ And More Like ‘Ivanka Trump’ And That’s Not Okay

Fierce

NBC Latina Correspondent Mariana Atencio Says She Was Told Not To Dress ‘Too Latina’ And More Like ‘Ivanka Trump’ And That’s Not Okay

amazon.com

Latina women struggle with workplace equality, imposter syndrome and feeling as if we don’t belong in certain institutions, and we’re also constantly told to shrink ourselves in order to not make others (read: white people) uncomfortable with our Latinidad. Another policing of our identities and how we navigate the workplace and the world is when others tell us what to wear or not wear. 

None of this is okay and Latina women deserve more respect and freedom to be our unapologetic selves.

NBC/MSNBC correspondent Mariana Atencio wrote in her new book that an unnamed female manager told her not to dress “too Latina” for the White House Correspondents Dinner in 2017.

According to Newsweek, the manager told Atencio that she should dress more like Ivanka Trump. In her new book, Perfectly You: Embracing the Power of Being Real, Atencio writes about how happy she was to represent the Latinx community and how proud she was to have a seat at the table, “literally and figuratively.” 

She also writes about the encounter she had with the unnamed female manager who gave her a call before the White House Correspondents Dinner and asked what she planned to wear to the dinner. 

“It was a weird phone call—with an even weirder request,” Atencio writes. ” ‘Why do you ask?’ I replied. ‘Please don’t look too Latina.’ At first, I thought I didn’t hear correctly. ‘I beg your pardon?’ I asked. ‘When you pick your outfit, I mean. Don’t look too Latina.'”

<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.nbcnews.com/knowyourvalue/embedded-video/mmvo62807621702″ scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

“I felt offended. Outrage and indignation hit me at once… This person was making me feel smaller and smaller with each word. Can you imagine someone in your field asking you to please not look so African American? Or Asian? Or white? Don’t look so Muslim or Christian? How do you change who you are?,” Atencio wrote. 

However, according to Atencio—the manager didn’t stop there with her unsolicited fashion advice. She went on to advise Atencio to go to Saks Fifth Avenue “and have someone help you out.” The female manager told Atencio, “‘Have them pick out something demure. Not too colorful or tight. Think Ivanka Trump, OK?'”

First of all, how do you dress “too Latina”? If that’s the case, should we stoop to the same level and say, “Ivanka, can you dress a little less like the complicit daughter of a racist commander in chief”?

According to a statement given to USA Today, MSNBC called the manager’s comments “highly inappropriate and unacceptable. More than a year and a half later, when it was first brought to a manager’s attention, immediate action was taken. Since this is an HR matter and there are privacy concerns, we won’t go into greater detail.”

In an interview with NBC News, the award-winning Venezuelan correspondent spoke about the incident and shared more lessons of inclusivity and diversity as well as what she hopes the book will achieve. The Latina immigrant journalist and author began her career in Venezuela and talked about what it was like being one of the first Latina journalists on air when she first began her career. 

“When I first started, it was more of, ‘How can we tone this down?’ But with time it was realizing that in fact, I had to be more myself,” Atencio said. 

She goes on to say that she wanted to include the anecdote in her memoir not to focus on the negative but to remind readers that “these things still happen. We have to call them out and have conversations as adults about how to get past them.”

People on social media shared their own experiences about going through something similar to what Atencio went through. 

Daisy Fuentes tweeted that she could relate and that it’s “time to end the racist stereotypes.” 

Another journalist said he’s heard this countless times from Latina coworkers in the media industry.

We’re glad men in the industry are also bringing to light this discriminatory and dangerous stereotype against Latina women and the Latinx community in general. 

Latinx film critic Yolanda Machado also shared that she’s been told to not “go all Latina” in reference to getting upset over something in the workplace.

“Most of these are followed by ‘I don’t see color, but…’ or ‘I don’t mean you, of course, but…'” she tweeted. “Racist. Racist. RACIST.” 

We applaud Mariana Atencio for including this in her memoir in order to work toward a future where Latina women in the workplace don’t have to undergo this type of behavior from others. 

“The message of my book is that you, too (readers) can make it. By sharing my journey, I hope to inspire (others) on their journey,” Atencio said of her memoir. 

Selena Quintanilla’s Sister Says The Dress Scene From The Movie Sadly Wasn’t Just A Story

Entertainment

Selena Quintanilla’s Sister Says The Dress Scene From The Movie Sadly Wasn’t Just A Story

Pinterest

A classic scene in the 1997 film “Selena” is when the Tejano queen is shopping for a dress at a high-end boutique for the Grammy Awards. The scene features a pretty classic “Pretty Woman” moment that so many women of color can relate to. While shopping in a store, Selena is told by a shop employee that she will not be able to afford the dress that she was looking at and wanted to try on. Obviously, the woman was racially profiling the Latina and didn’t recognize her as the famous pop star she was. The shop employee later gets her just deserts when she sees Selena surrounded by fans, all clamoring for an autograph.

Famously, the scene ends with Selena declining to buy the dress and the shop employee realizing that she messed up big time.

As much as we love that scene, we’ve now found out that it didn’t exactly go down the way we thought.

Instagram / @Selena.daily

On July 30th, Selena fan Insta page, Selena.daily, posted a clip from a 2012 live stream where Selena’s siblings talked about that infamous dress scene. In the video, Suzette and A.B. Quintanilla explained that the interaction between Selena and a rude shop employee wasn’t just a one-time occurrence. Like many Black and brown people, Selena was racially profiled several times while out shopping with friends and family.

In the live stream, A.B. reads a question from a fan asking if the dress incident was a real thing that happened or if it was made up for the movie.

Instagram / @Selena.daily

“It happened with me, too” A.B. exclaims in the video. “They were following us ⁠— some security guards. We were in a Macy’s and Selena ⁠— she always picked me to go shopping with her, man. So I went with her when (Suzette) wasn’t around and so I’m with her and some security guard is following us… She turns around towards the guy and says, ‘Can I help you!? We’re not going to steal anything!'”

Like so many Black and brown people, she was being racially profiled by security because she didn’t fit the “look” of someone who would be shopping at the store. It’s hard to imagine that someone as famous as Selena would have this happen to her too but, when it comes to racists and racial profiling, the only thing that matters is skin color.

Suzette shared the reason why she thought Selena was probably the victim of profiling more often than once.

Twitter / @4Prina

Suzette talked about memories of her sister; how she would dress and how she would react when she found herself in these situations.

“I think that Selena’s thing was that Selena always dressed in jeans and a tee-shirt and she always had her hair in a low bun. You know, she would get mad when people would stereotype her.”

The public usually sees celebrities dressed up and looking like they’ve come off the red carpet. Selena wasn’t one of those celebrities. She was an ordinary girl who felt most at home in a pair of jeans. Due to this, it was easy for security guards and shop employees to mistake her for a non-celebrity. However, whether they aren’t famous or they are, the profiling of people of color is very real (it even happened to Oprah recently!) and it remains something that regularly happens decades later.

The current racial profiling by ICE has become especially dangerous and is something that should be outlawed.

Twitter / @RAICESTEXAS

Raids done by US Customs and Border Protection and ICE are racially motivated. Agents see groups of Black or brown people and identify these gatherings as possible targets to be detained. Places like buses, bars, restaurant kitchens, and nail salons are being targeted by these officers because they are identified as places that minorities frequent. It’s not a precise investigation as much as it’s a fishing net to capture for undocumented migrants.

The same happened to Francisco Erwin Galicia when he was illegally detained by ICE for three weeks. The teenager was just walking down the street with his brother when he was stopped and jailed by officers of ICE. Despite being a natural-born citizen, Galicia physically fit the stereotype of an undocumented immigrant so he became an easy target.

While that dress scene in “Selena” is one of the most satisfying parts of the movie, it points out a very real problem in our current society. We can’t help but wonder: If Selena was alive and well today, would she be as vulnerable to these illegal raids as so many of us are?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2Y4bgv6cts

Paid Promoted Stories