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Mexico, Colombia, Brazil and Puerto Rico Inspired these MLS Jersey Remixes

La Casaca is a blog dedicated to remixing soccer jerseys from around the world.

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If you love the colors of fútbol, they’re always tinkering with designs and asking “What if X jersey looked like Y?”

Here’s an example: La Casaca asked: “What if national teams wore jerseys designed by famous clothing brands?

casaca-designerCredit: La Casaca

They imagined what it would look like if France’s jersey was made by Lacoste, the US jersey was made by Ralph Lauren and Italy’s jersey was made by Armani. Not bad, right?

This month, the designers at La Casaca were asked by Major League Soccer to create some designs inspired by Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States. So they took a few MLS jerseys and added a Latin American twist to each of them.

Their Chicago Fire jersey was inspired by former Mexican player Cuauhtémoc Blanco and Mexican painter Hector Duarte.

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Credit: La Casaca

The result:

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Credit: La Casaca

For New York City FC, the Bronx’s Puerto Rican population and hip hop graffiti served as an inspiration.

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Credit: La Casaca

The result:

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Credit: La Casaca

The New York Red Bulls jersey was inspired by former Colombian star Juan Pablo Ángel and Colombia’s folkloric clothing.

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Credit: La Casaca

The result:

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Credit: La Casaca

Brazilian star Kaká and the colorful neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro inspired their Orlando City SC jersey.

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Credit: La Casaca

The result:

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Credit: La Casaca

The Los Angeles Galaxy jersey was inspired by Mexican star Giovani Dos Santos and a traditional Mexican textile pattern.

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Credit: La Casaca

The result:

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Credit: La Casaca

For more fútbol jersey remixes, visit La Casaca.

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Mexico Has No Problem Admitting They Stole These Telenovelas

Entertainment

Mexico Has No Problem Admitting They Stole These Telenovelas

Sure, most telenovelas we grew up loving aren’t Mexican originals, but lets face it – Mexicans did it better.

María la del Barrio
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Credit: Televisa/ThaliaNow/Tumblr

“Y a mucha honra.” Anything that Mexican actress Thalía touched turned to solid gold and María la del Barrio wasn’t the exception. This telenovela gave us some of the sexiest love scenes between her and Fernando Colunga ? and, of course, the most iconic villain in telenovela history…

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Credit: kaisergeyser / Tumblr / Televisa
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Credit: ohyeahpop / Tumblr / Televisa

Soraya Montenegro played by Itatí Cantoral. Memes are still being created in her honor, because Mexicans definitely know how to do drama better.

Rebelde

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Credit: Televisa

And you thought Rebelde was a Mexican original. Nope. Your favorite musical telenovela was taken from Argentina and it was called Rebelde Way. Here’s the original cast…

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Credit: Televisionando

There’s no competition. Mexico’s rebeldes were waaay hotter.

Carrusel

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Credit: Televisa

This was everyone’s go-to when we were younger – it was better than Full House.  Few people know it was an adaptation of the Argentine soap opera called Señorita Maestra. In Mexico, the remake was released in 1989, five years after the original. We can’t really remember who was in the Señorita Maestra cast, but Carrusel made us fall in love with Cirilo, La Maestra Jimena and of course María Joaquina’s sassiness.

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Credit: Televisa / jaimecamilsaldanadagama / Blogspot

That side-eye though.

Rubí

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Credit: rubifuracao / Tumblr / Televisa

This soap opera was originally released in 1968, although it failed to take off internationally at the time, it became a movie in the seventies. BUT in 2004, Mexico remade the telenovela with bombshell Barbara Mori and broke rating records thanks to her over-the-top performances and sensuality. It’s still one of Mexico’s top performing telenovelas.

La Usurpadora

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Credit: kittypavl / Tumblr / Televisa

In 1971, Venezuela tried their luck with a telenovela about a woman and her long-lost evil twin sister. It fell flat to say the least. Then Televisa added their magic touch to the story, plus Gabriela Spanic’s talent y sas and it was a hit.

Amor en Custodia

Credit: Lupitarebel / YouTube/ TV Azteca

With catch phrases like “cómprate una alcancía y ahorrate tus comentarios” and “cómprate una vida y cárgala a mi cuenta eres w, porque ni a la x llegas,” Barbie Pacheco totally overshadowed the original version that was created in Argentina in 2005. She was every mean girl’s idol.

Mirada de Mujer

Credit: TV Azteca/paul01chiman/YouTube

Mirada de Mujer is based on the Colombian telenovela Señora Isabel (1994) and is considered one of the best Telenovelas in history thanks to its stellar cast – in the Mexican remake — which included Angélica Aragón and Bárbara Mori among other fierce actresses. The telenovela tells the story of Maria Ines, a 50 year old woman, whose husband has a mistress 20-years-younger than her, but things take a turn when a young man helps her discover that there is love and life after turning 50. Drama.

La Fea Más Bella

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Credit: v-alecamil / Tumblr

Angélica Vale brought to life the iconic character Leticia “Lety” Padilla Solis, a young intelligent woman that’s faces hardships for being ugly and we mean, ugly. The series was based on the Colombian telenovela Betty la fea. What made this version better than the original? Her adorable relationship with heartthrob, Jaime Camil.

Clase 406

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Credit: ahuniversal / Tumblr

Ever heard of the telenovela Francisco el Matemático? It aired in 1999 in Colombia and gave way to the Mexican remake Clase 406, which featured a sexy cast of young actors like Aaron Diaz, Dulce Maria, Anahí and Alfonso Herrera. It’s central themes of sex, drugs, abuse drinking, deception, and heartbreak instantly hooked its audience making this remake a total hit.

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