Entertainment

It’s Time We Crown Gina Rodriguez The Social Media Fairy Godmother

High school senior Jessica Casanova reached for the stars on Twitter — and she grabbed one. A few months ago, Casanova asked “Jane the Virgin” star Gina Rodriguez if she could borrow one of her dresses for prom. Gina, being the classy, gracious and very loving person she is, made sure Jessica’s dreams came true. Here’s how it all went down. Get ready to feel all warm and fuzzy.

This is the tweet that started it all.

Credit: @TheJessica_C / Twitter

We’ve all wanted to do this, right?

Which dress? This dress, but there was a problem.

My best friend. My muse. My ride or die. My homeboy. I love you pops. #goldenglobes #LastOne #ButTheBestOne

A photo posted by Gina Rodriguez (@hereisgina) on

Credit: @hereisgina / Instagram

Gina Rodriguez, who responded to the fan in less than two hours, doesn’t own that dress.

Credit: @HereIsGina / Twitter

But it’s OK, because Gina had a plan.

But she does own this dress…

Credit: @hereisgina / Instagram

And Twitter’s collective hearts started to beat like super fast.

And she was determined to make her Casanova’s dream come true, so Gina offered her black dress instead.

Credit: @TheJessica_C / Twitter

Like, how can we be blessed by Godmother Gina?

Credit: @HereIsGina / Twitter

*starts aggressively tweeting every celeb for #OOTD*

Clearly all of Gina’s fans were onboard to see this happen. Positive peer pressure at its finest.

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Credit: @HereIsGina / Twitter

BTW, Gina totally came through for Jessica! ? ? ? ?

Credit: @TheJessica_C / Twitter

And Gina was just as excited as Jessica that the dress had arrived!

Credit: @HereIsGina / Twitter

“I don’t know what made me do it,” Jessica told Buffalo News about tweeting Gina in the first place. “I got chills,” she continued when talking about trying it on.

Here is a reenactment of how we assume Jessica reacted to getting the dress.

giphy-3
Credit: Jane The Virgin / CW / ilikeubuturcrazy / Tumblr

AAAAAAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!

TheDress
Credit: TWCNews Buffalo

Celebs, take note. That’s how you do it, y’all.

Here is Casanova in Gina’s dress. Fits just right.

Credit: @RobertKirkhamBN / Twitter

Gina even sent Jessica a video to make sure her prom night was going well. Why? Because Gina is classy AF. “Even though she’s filming a movie right now in London, she took her time to actually take a break and respond to me, making sure that my night was going well, which I appreciate that very much,” Jessica told TWC News Buffalo.

Jessica (and her date) totally slayed like Gina did when she won her Golden Globe.

Credit: @TheJessica_C / Twitter

Now THAT is a magical prom story brought to you by the one and only Gina Rodriguez.

READ: 11 Times Gina Rodriguez Was Incredibly Inspiring On Instagram

Maybe you should ask your favorite celeb for a little favor? Share this story with all your friends by tapping that share button below!

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Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Things That Matter

Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Ever notice how on some social platforms like Twitter or Instagram that you yourself are mysteriously unable to crop your display images on your own? That’s because Twitter prefers to let their algorithms make the decision. Over the weekend users on Twitter discovered the surprising dangers of letting algorithms crop your own images.

Education tech researcher Colin Madland drew attention to the issue while speaking out about how the video-calling program Zoom, often crops the head out of his black person coworker while on calls.

It didn’t take long for Madland and other users to discover that Twitter’s AIs use discriminatory equations to prioritize certain faces as well. In short, the social platform’s AIs prefer white faces over Black ones.

In response to the discoveries, a Twitter spokesperson acknowledged that the company was looking into the issue “Our team did test for bias before shipping the model and did not find evidence of racial or gender bias in our testing. But it’s clear from these examples that we’ve got more analysis to do. We’re looking into this and will continue to share what we learn and what actions we take,” they stated.

Of course, Madland’s discovery is nothing new. In 2019, test results from the National Institute of Standards and Technology revealed that some of the strongest algorithms online were much more likely to confuse the faces of Black women than those of white women, or Black or white men. “The NIST test challenged algorithms to verify that two photos showed the same face, similar to how a border agent would check passports,” Wired points out. “At sensitivity settings where Idemia’s algorithms falsely matched different white women’s faces at a rate of one in 10,000, it falsely matched black women’s faces about once in 1,000—10 times more frequently. A one in 10,000 false match rate is often used to evaluate facial recognition systems.”

Still, it didn’t take long for users on the platform to ask what other physical preferences Twitter has.

Turns out the AIs prefer Ted Cruz with large anime breasts over a normal-looking Ted Cruz.

(To better understand this Tweet, click the link above)

The user who tested the image of Cruz, found that Twitter’s algorithm on the back end selected what part of the picture it would showcase in the preview and ultimately chose both images of Cruz with a large anime chest.

It’s nothing new that Twitter has its massive problems.

For a platform that so controls and oversees so much of what we consume and how we now operate, it’s scary to know how Twitter chooses to display people with different skin tones. The round of jokes and Twitter experiments by users has only revived concerns on how “learning” computer algorithms fuel real-world biases like racism and sexism.

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Yaltiza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

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Yaltiza Aparicio Stars In Dior’s Women-Centric Film Series

Dior/ Youtube.com

In the two years that have passed since her debut as an actress in the 2018 Academy Award-winning film Roma, Yaltiza Aparicio has established herself as a Hollywood “get.” The Indigenous actress has appeared countless times on the cover of magazines, ones like Vogue México and Vanity Fair, and has been featured in ad campaigns for designers like Rodarte. So it’s no surprise that she has now been tapped to be part of Dior’s new campaign “Dior Stands with Women.”

As part of an effort to celebrate women across the film, beauty, and health industries Dior has launched its “Dior Stands with Women” campaign.

On Monday, the fashion brand announced it had launched a series of short films honoring women and their contributions to the industries and communities which they occupy. The campaign features actresses like Yaltiza Aparicio, model Paloma Elsesser, dancer Leyna Bloom, Cara Delevingne, Charlize Theron, Parris Goebel, and others.

In a statement about the campaign, Dior announced their intent in a post on Instagram. “Inspired by the exceptional women who have marked its history, Christian Dior Parfums unveils a series of short filmed portraits that give a chance to speak to extraordinary women,” it reads.

Speaking in the portrait series, Aparicio explains “For me, being a woman means being strong, always holding your head up because they tell you what they say, you must be sure of what you are capable of,” she went onto say that as “as an ambassador for UNESCO, my role is to represent indigenous communities with dignity. Give them a voice and visibility, which is something that we have lacked for a long time… Women have fought for many years for gender equality. It is not about being superior to men, it is about having the same opportunities, that in your work they give you a fair salary and not simply because you are a woman they pay you less or that they consider that you have fewer capacities simply because you are a woman.”

Speaking about their journeys, actresses Cara Delevinge and Charlize Theron touched on being unapologetic and part of male-dominated industries.

Check out Yalitza and the others in the Dior campaigns below.

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