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When a White Girl Realizes Huaraches Weren’t Invented by TOMS

CREDIT: DREAM TV / YOUTUBE

TOMS’s Wet Dream

La Quirky Nancy, who was inspired by the #Columbusing of Latino culture, continues unearthing her “discoveries” in East L.A. This time she dives into the ever-so-famous El Mercadito. What caught her eye this episode? Huaraches.

Compared to TOMS’s popular brand, Nancy learns this legit version costs only a fraction of the price — which gave her a sneaky idea. No, we’re not telling. Watch the video above to find out what Nancy has up her sleeve and how she got into trouble placing a simple order of aguas frescas.

WATCH: White People Discovering Mangoes on a Stick Inspires La Quirky Nancy


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Here’s Why Housing Advocates Are Warning Against Amazon’s Impact On Affordable Housing

Things That Matter

Here’s Why Housing Advocates Are Warning Against Amazon’s Impact On Affordable Housing

ocasio2018 / amazon / Instagram

After months of speculation, Amazon announced that the locations of its second headquarters will be in Long Island City, New York, and Arlington, Virginia. The announcement has been met with criticism from local community members and officials that say the influx of tech workers would fuel gentrification and hurt lower-income populations. Newly elected Congresswoman-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been one of the most vocal public officials to condemn Amazon for moving to Long Island. Ocasio-Cortez represents the 14th Congressional District of New York, which borders the district that includes Long Island City, and says the move “is extremely concerning to residents here.”

Residents and real estate watchers are monitoring the impact Amazon will have on rent and living costs in both New York and Virginia.

Housing displacement was a platform issue that Ocasio-Cortez ran on and is a vocal advocate for affordable housing. She took to Twitter to voice her displeasure about Amazon’s announcement. Ocasio-Cortez said that “shuffling working class people out of a community does not improve their quality of life.” Community members fear that Amazon’s decision to set up shop in New York will hasten gentrification, increase housing prices and displace current residents.

Northern Virginia realtor Jen Walker told NBC Washington that there has already been signs of the “the Amazon effect” on the local real estate marketplace. “They woke up this morning, saw the Amazon announcement and they decided they wanted to move forward with a contract,” she said. “They said, ‘We’re going to get priced out if we don’t do this now.'”

Alex Howe, a member of the group runs the website NoVa Says No to Amazon, echoed a similar message as Walker saying that the real estate market will drastically change now that Amazon is here. “Those already prospering will flourish and those who struggle in our region will be further pushed out and erased,” Howe said. “If Amazon comes here, it should be on our terms and they should pay their fair share in our community if they expect to set up shop here.”

Amazon says it will invest $5 billion and create more than 50,000 jobs across the two new headquarters locations but some are questioning if the company will follow through.

Rising home prices and cost of living have been huge concerns for many communities across the U.S. in places like San Francisco and Seattle, where Amazon is already established. Amazon says their new headquarters will generate millions of dollars in revenue and jobs opportunities. Yet many don’t see it that way as tech companies have been known to price out many long-time residents and hire from outside local communities.

“We are excited to build new headquarters in New York City and Northern Virginia,” Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, said in a statement. “These two locations will allow us to attract world-class talent that will help us to continue inventing for customers for years to come. The team did a great job selecting these sites, and we look forward to becoming an even bigger part of these communities.”

Since Amazon’s arrival, Seattle has become one of the most expensive cities to live in the U.S, forcing many Latino and black residents to move to far-off suburbs.

Hundreds of protesters took to the streets in New York to voice their displeasure with the announcement of a new headquarters.

On Wednesday, protesters gathered near Amazon’s soon-to-be headquarters in New York City to voice their concern over the multibillion-dollar incentives being awarded to Amazon. Protesters warn of the potential impact it will have on their community.

Ocasio-Cortez has echoed many residents worries and said she is concerned not just about Amazon specifically, but rather about the relationships that the government has with its citizens and corporations.

“This isn’t just about one company or one headquarters. It’s about cost of living, corps paying their fair share, etc,” she wrote on Twitter. “It’s not about picking a fight, either. I was elected to advocate for our community’s interests – & they’ve requested, clearly, to voice their concerns.”

Mitú reached out to Amazon but there has been no response as this time.


READ: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Victory Lap Rallies To Abolish ICE, Erase Student Loan Debt And Keep Organizing

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Starz Is Giving The Story Of Gentrification In Boyle Heights A Different Spin With Their Show ‘Vida’

Entertainment

Starz Is Giving The Story Of Gentrification In Boyle Heights A Different Spin With Their Show ‘Vida’

Vida / Facebook

Latino representation on television has usually been a slippery slope of stereotypes or false portrayals of what it really means to be Latino in America. Yet Starz’s new half-hour series “Vida” feels like something new and refreshing in the world of scripted TV. The show focuses on two sisters Emma (Mishel Prada) and Lyn (Melissa Barrera) as they return to their home in quickly changing Boyle Heights after their mom’s death.

The six episode series represents a side of Latinos that are rarely shown on mainstream television.

“Vida” joins other Latino-centered shows on television, including “Narcos,” “One Day at a Time,” “Queen of the South” and “Jane the Virgin.” However, it stands on its own with its fresh perspective on the Latinx experience living in Los Angeles. The show tackles topics like class, gentrification and homophobia. The show is a snapshot of our diverse culture that mainstream television rarely captures.

“Vida” is making waves with its Creator Tanya Saracho and her all Latinx writers.

Saracho is the creator and executive producer of “Vida” and after writing for other popular shows like “Devious Maids,” “Looking,” and “How to Get Away with Murder,” she truly found her calling. She felt she could finally tell stories on TV that were relevant to her own experiences. By having an entire Latinx writing staff, Saracho is paving a way for representation that goes beyond just the screen but the writers room that Hollywood rarely has found.

Fans and critics are already praising the show for its fresh representation.

After premiering on May 6, the show already has a solid fan base and has been praised for its characters and plot. It already has a 100 percent “Fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

“Vida” is currently streaming for free on Starz.com, the Starz YouTube channel and the “Vida” Facebook page.

The show captures many themes that most Latinx can relate to, whether it’s the fight for representation in their own community, the feeling of not being “Mexican enough’ in your own family and finding one’s identity. “Vida” is a landmark moment in Latino television that hopefully paves the way for more shows that capture more than just stereotypes but the true Latinx experience in America.


READ: These 11 Moments From ‘On My Block’ Are Some Of The Realest Latino Moments Captured On Film

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