Things That Matter

Hillary Clinton Was Asked about this Race-Related Question and Here’s How She Answered

During the audience Q&A section of Fusion’s 2016 Brown & Black Democratic Presidential Forum, Hillary Clinton was asked a question she probably wasn’t expecting…

Thalia Anguiano, a junior at Drake University, asked Clinton about her white privilege.

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Credit: Fusion / YouTube

“Secretary Clinton, can you tell us what the term white privilege means to you and can you give me an example from your life or career when you think you have benefited from it,” Anguiano asked the Democratic presidential candidate.

Everyone get very excited for Clinton’s answer.

Good Question
Credit: Fusion / YouTube

Girl even impressed Jorge Ramos, and she knew it.

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Credit: Fusion / YouTube

Go back and look at Ramos shift in his seat like, “THIS IS GONNA BE GOOD.”

READ: Carla Hernandez from UT Austin Just Caused an Uproar Over Her GOP Debate Question

“Where do I start,” Clinton began.

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Credit: Fusion / YouTube

“It is hard when you are swimming in the ocean to know exactly what is happening around you so much as it is when you are standing on the shore perhaps watching,” Clinton said.

She then spent some time talking about being raised in a white middle-class family in middle America with opportunities to go to great schools and attend a great college.

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Credit: Fusion / YouTube

“I never really knew what was or wasn’t part of the privilege, I just knew that I was a lucky person,” Clinton said. “And that being lucky was in part related to who I am, where I’m from, and the opportunities I had.”

And she used that as a segue to bring up the story of babysitting the children of migrant workers – a story she’s told several times.

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Credit: Fusion / YouTube

“When I was about 11 years old, our church asked if some of us would volunteer to babysit for the children of migrant workers on Saturdays,” Clinton recalled. “Because the families had to go into the fields and the older kids had to go with them and there was nobody left to watch the little kids.”

READ: #NotMyAbuela Starts Trending After Hillary Clinton Site Compares Her to Abuelas

It seemed like people in the audience were like:

giphy
Credit: Parks & Recreation / NBC / SHIFTGOTSTUCK / Reddit

How does babysitting someone make you realize white privilege at the age of 11?

Watch Hillary Clinton’s full answer below:

Credit: Fusion / YouTube

Do you think Hillary Clinton really answered the question? Share this story with all your friends by tapping the share button below and see what they think.

SNL Did A Segment On How The Big Oscar Nominated Films Are About White Male Rage And It’s Surprisingly Spot On

Entertainment

SNL Did A Segment On How The Big Oscar Nominated Films Are About White Male Rage And It’s Surprisingly Spot On

Saturday Night Live / YouTube

Saturday Night Live’s Melissa Villaseñor enraged white males by singing a song about white male rage on the show. With the Oscars around the corner, SNL offered its own little analysis of the nominees during their ‘Weekend Update’ segment. In the skit Villaseñor discusses the biggest Oscar nominees and sings songs about how all the plots are based around, or sparked by (you guessed it) while male rage —and tbh, it’s kind of on point.

Villaseñor was brought on to discuss the big Oscar nominees and began by singing a song about Todd Phillips’ Joker.

In a visit to Colin Jost’s Weekend Update desk, cast member Melissa Villaseñor educated Jost on the Best Picture nominees, singing a silly and kind of accurate song about “Joker” and “The Irishman.” The song started off simply outlining the plot of the film until it took a turn; “But the thing that this movie is really about is white male rage, white male rage, white male rage.” The comedian then proceeded to sing a ditty about The Irishman and the tune ended with the observation that, in fact, the picture is also, actually all about white male rage.

Jost plays the straight man who disagrees.

Playing the straight man, Jost said of Villaseñor’s song: “It seemed like it was just a description of the movie, and then it took a weird turn into social commentary.” You can guess what happens when she moves onto Martin Scorsese’s Netflix masterpiece “The Irishman.”

When Jost asked how many more songs there were, Villaseñor said she had “a whole bunch”…

But said she would “combine them all,” rattling through nominated films that shared the narrative of “white male rage” such as “Once Upon A Time … In Hollywood,” “Jojo Rabbit” and “1917” — while adding that “Little Women” director Greta Gerwig, whose film was not about “white male rage,” was snubbed for a best director nomination.

#WhiteMaleRage became a trending topic on Twitter.

The words, which were written by Villaseñor and SNL writers Dan Bulla and Steven Castillostruck a chord on Twitter, where the #WhiteMaleRage hashtag began trending and had over 14,000 tweets by Sunday afternoon.

As you might have predicted, the white men of the internet reacted, well, angrily.

As they tend to do, white men were busy being upset about people pointing out the obvious. #WhiteMaleRage wasn’t a suggestion up for debate. It was merely a fact. Take a look at the Oscar noms for Best Picture this year and tell us Melissa is wrong?

The irony was clearly lost on these people.

But some just couldn’t let go…

Other Twitter users found the skit pretty funny, and even agreed with the message.

This isn’t the first skit or celebrity to talk about the issues the Oscars continue to face. Just two years ago #OscarsSoWhite was trending across social media and it seems like the Academy has totally forgotten that controversy this year.

This tweet perfectly summed up what many were thinking…

Airing on January 25, last week’s “Saturday Night Live” was the 11th episode of the NBC sketch show’s 45th season. Oscar nominee Adam Driver was the host with the musical performance by Halsey. (Driver is nominated for Best Actor for his turn as a father fighting for custody of his son during a contentious divorce in Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story.”)

Here Are 8 Latino Christmas Movies You Should Watch To Get Into The Festive Season

Entertainment

Here Are 8 Latino Christmas Movies You Should Watch To Get Into The Festive Season

Crown Media

This Christmas, when you’re getting comfy on the couch, ready to turn on the TV and watch a Holiday film, one thing is certain: we all know what the leads will look like. It’s safe to assume that the actors of most Christmas movies are white. 

Christmas and the whole holiday season is an important time of year for Latinos, traditionally and culturally, so it’s exciting to see Latinos on screen portraying our seasonal conflicts, rituals and family dynamics whenever the opportunity arises —which is not very often tbh.

When it comes to African American and Asian romantic leads in Hallmark holiday movies, the number is zero.

According to the numbers. By the end of 2017, Hallmark premiered a combined 86 new movies on two of its networks, Hallmark Channel and Hallmark Movies & Mysteries. Only six of those movies had non-white romantic leads. That same year, Hallmark debuted three films with Catherine Bell (“Good Witch: Spellbound,” “Home for Christmas Day” and “Christmas in the Air”), who is half Iranian; one movie with Julie Gonzalo (“Falling for Vermont”), who’s from Argentina; and two movies with Alexa PenaVega (“Destination Wedding”), one of which also starred her husband Carlos PenaVega (“Enchanted Christmas”), both of whom are Hispanic.

While there obviously needs to be more seasonal films where Latinos take the lead, there are a number of films that Latinxs can watch to see themselves represented on screen. Keep scrolling to read all about them, here are some of our faves. 

Christmas Bounty

Starring Francia Raisa, this film is all about a bounty hunter-turned-elementary shool teacher who tries to keep her past a secret. Shenanigans follow as Raisa’s character reluctantly returns home for the holiday season. 

Nothing Like The Holidays

Credit: deswest_mac / Instagram

The dysfunctional Puerto Rican Rodriguez family reunite and fight for the first time in years in Alfredo De Villa’s Nothing Like the Holidays.  John Leguizamo, Freddy Rodriguez, Elizabeth Peña, Luis Guzmán, Jay Hernandez and Melonie Diaz appear as the Rodriguezs, gathering for Christmas in their family home in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood. 

¡Feliz Christmas, Merry Navidad!

Spanish-language ¡Feliz Christmas, Merry Navidad! directed by Luis Palomo, stars Tere López-Tarín, Carlos Soriano, and Angelina Cruz. The family-friendly magical-realistic holiday film tells the tale of three children who overcome differences in the interest of friendship.  The inspiration Christmas movie exposes the true meaning of Christmas, and the value of interpersonal relationships and family.

El Camino Christmas

Credit: kambizshayanfard / Instagram

Starring Jessica Alba and Emilio Rivera —better known for his role on Sons of Anarchy—this comedy will make you LOL. The story of a man who’s in search for his father and then gets stuck in a liquor store on Christmas eve, has at least a little bit of diversity in it, so why not give it a go?

This Christmas 

Laz Alonso and Lupe Ontiveros star in the African American holiday comedy-drama This Christmas, a film about the Whitfield family. The estranged family gathers under the same roof for the first time in seven years, and the attempt to rekindle broken relationships.

A Very Harold And Kumar Christmas 

This is one of the most diverse Christmas movies out there. It includes a few Latinx stars in it —Danny Trejo and the Colombian-American actress Paula Garces. The movie is about Kumar and Harold’s holiday adventures and, let’s just say there’s lots of cannabis involved. 

Esta Navidad

The 1959 film is somewhat of a cult classic. Directed by Rene Cardoso, the Mexican film is about the Devil’s evil plan to kill Santa Claus. The surreal film is set in Santa’s cloud castle as well as in Mexico City. It’s not a traditional film, but definitely worth seeing. 

Holiday in Handcuffs

Mario Lopez and Melissa Joan Hart star in Holiday in Handcuffs, a holiday film about a miserable and lonely waitress and aspiring painter who kidnaps a customer from her job, so that she can introduce him to her family as her boyfriend. Mario Lopez plays the kidnapped fake boyfriend —and I mean, if I had the chance to kidnap Mario Lopez, you best believe I would.