Culture

Here’s Some Girl Power Art to Make You Feel Strong and Beautiful…because You Are

Have you ever been walking down the street, minding your own damn business, when some man found it appropriate to start catcalling? Well, this Latina was catcalled while visiting Panama and took the experience and transformed it into an art series calling for #GRLPWR. BOOM.

Say hello to Debi Hasky.

When you don't know what to do in front of the camera ? feat. outtakes from yesterday's portrait sesh

A photo posted by Debi Hasky (@debihasky) on

She’s transformed misogynistic experiences into empowering art.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

You tell ’em, girl! ✊

From the rude catcalls of street workers…

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

…to being called thunder thighs.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook
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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

READ: Letters of Detained Immigrants are Getting Mass Exposure by Becoming Works of Art

In two languages, no less.

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Credit: xylark / Tumblr

Hasky wants her art to inspire action.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

Because everyone deserves some respect. How would you feel if your abuelita, mami, or hermana was on the receiving end of catcalls?

She’s letting people know that women are strong.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

And beautiful.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

And they really DGAF what men think.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

READ: Try This Fashion Trend: Chola Chic

Her art earned her the chance to study abroad in Barcelona.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

There was a scholarship contest that Hasky learned about based on the theme: Design for A Better World.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

“After ruling out themes I could not relate to, I was inspired by a group of street workers in Panama while they shouted obscenities at me,” Hasky wrote on her Facebook. “Inspired by conversations with friends who have experienced a similar forms of harassment and the unbearable discomfort it produces inside us all, I went ahead and created a few #GRLPWR designs and turned it all in.”

Hasky’s art has evolved and grown since moving to Barcelona.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

Further embracing all types of women.

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Credit: Debi Hasky / Facebook

Check out her full gallery here.

Are you inspired by Hasky’s art? Like our Facebook to get more stories like this delivered straight to you phone. You can also share this story with your friends to spread the #GRLPWR.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

AOC’s Quote About Being The Only Daughter In A Latino Household Is Getting Latinas Fired Up

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AOC’s Quote About Being The Only Daughter In A Latino Household Is Getting Latinas Fired Up

Brittany Greeson / Getty

As young Latinos, there’s no denying the fact that learning to fold our family culture into the customs we acquire as Americans can shape our abilities to handle pressure. In the process of assimilation, we learn how to meet the demands of our parents and our peers all the while juggling the everyday expectations we shoulder while in school.

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez knows all about managing these expectations. Last year, while addressing the media’s desire to see her pursue her career and fulfill societal expectations of her personal life (AKA get married) the politician reminded her followers that she can handle pressure because she grew up in a Latino household.

To boot, she was the only daughter in her home.

But what about the rest of us?

Those of us who maybe aren’t quite yet thriving politicians but manage to succeed in our everyday lives and do it all? We asked Latinas on FIERCE about how they’re able to relate to AOC’s comments and the responses were not only enlightening but a good reminder of Latina strength.

“And the oldest for that matter!! You not only learn to be tough, but also to be resourceful and amazingly great at delegating.” – emramirez1

“So true ughh the oldest child the only female and the first American born and the first to go to college oyeeeee the PRESSURE #mujerfuerte AINT NO ONE CAN TAKE ME DOWN lol por que our familia made us strong!” –paulinacastrellon

“Or the OLDEST daughter.” –m0zz_

“And be a food server for many years…” –kimoti_87

“Only daughter and only child! Thats some other level of #latinohousehold.” –wellnessparalamama

“Or a daughter in a Latino household with a strict father period!” –elliev03

“Look i went through allot and none of it made me stronger im a very shaky person theres a difference between trauma and tough love , i think she had tough love trauama fucks u up.” –__head___in___the____clouds__

“Oldest daughter, of 3 girls! You are the example!” – _cynnrenee

“I only wish the means to becoming tough and handle pressure for a Latina daughter didn’t root in traumatic machismo (male chauvinism) and systematic inequalities experiences. Surely there are ways to learn to have an affirmative tone and handle pressure without the trauma.” – marimukkii

“Or just being in a Latina household, period.” –mar_knut

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A Recently Shared Letter From Frida Kahlo To Diego Rivera Details Her Struggle The Day Before Having Her Leg Amputated And It Will Break Your Heart

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A Recently Shared Letter From Frida Kahlo To Diego Rivera Details Her Struggle The Day Before Having Her Leg Amputated And It Will Break Your Heart

Fotosearch / Getty

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera have been known for having one of the art world’s most notoriously turbulent marriages. Both artists were guilty of having multiple affairs and straying away from their marriage, breaking up and getting back together only to become one again. Yet, despite their hard times, the Mexican artists had a bond that transcended the ages and one that has stirred countless discussions about their passion and love.

In a series of love letters from Kahlo to Rivera published in The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portrait readers are given insight into both the anguish and longing that was woven into their marriage.

One letter, recently shared by the Instagram page @historycoolkids, shows a momentary rift in their marriage when Kahlo was preparing to have her leg amputated.

Written in 1953, the letter for Rivera was written while Kahlo was in the hospital.

It reads:

⁣”I’m writing this letter from a hospital room before I am admitted into the operating theatre. They want me to hurry, but I am determined to finish writing first, as I don’t want to leave anything unfinished. Especially now that I know what they are up to. They want to hurt my pride by cutting a leg off. When they told me it would be necessary to amputate, the news didn’t affect me the way everybody expected. No, I was already a maimed woman when I lost you, again, for the umpteenth time maybe, and still I survived.⁣

I am not afraid of pain and you know it. It is almost inherent to my being, although I confess that I suffered, and a great deal, when you cheated on me, every time you did it, not just with my sister but with so many other women. How did they let themselves be fooled by you?

Let’s not fool ourselves, Diego, I gave you everything that is humanly possible to offer and we both know that. But still, how the hell do you manage to seduce so many women when you’re such an ugly son of a bitch?

The reason why I’m writing is not to accuse you of anything more than we’ve already accused each other of in this and however many more bloody lives. It’s because I’m having a leg cut off (damned thing, it got what it wanted in the end). I told you I’ve counted myself as incomplete for a long time, but why the fuck does everybody else need to know about it too? Now my fragmentation will be obvious for everyone to see, for you to see… That’s why I’m telling you before you hear it on the grapevine. I’m writing to let you know I’m releasing you, I’m amputating you. Be happy and never seek me again. I don’t want to hear from you, I don’t want you to hear from me. If there is anything I’d enjoy before I die, it’d be not having to see your fucking horrible bastard face wandering around my garden.⁣

That is all, I can now go to be chopped up in peace.⁣

Good bye from somebody who is crazy and vehemently in love with you,⁣

Your Frida”

Despite the letter, Kahlo didn’t “amputate” Rivera out of her life completely.

In fact, in her last days, Kahlo lived with Rivera and even made a public appearance with him in a demonstration against the CIA invasion of Guatemala. After her death, Rivera stated that her loss was “the most tragic day of my life.” Three years after his death, Riva requested to have his ashes mixed with Kahlo’s (this despite the fact that he married again after her death). Instead, the Mexican government opted to inter his remains in Mexico City’s famous Rotunda of Illustrious Men.

The message from Kahlo is being celebrated by her fans on Instagram as the “best letter in history.”

Fans of Kahlo called her letter “badass” and the greatest they’d ever read. “She was such a talent and such a twisted soul,” one user wrote in the post’s comment sections.

That part where she wonders why Diego was able to be such a womanizer despite being an “ugly son of a bitch” does pretty much make her badass.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com