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Here’s How You Can Come Up On Some Cash If You’re A DACA Student

TheDream.US is on a mission to get as many DACA, undocumented and first-generation students to college. The organization first launched in 2014 and has already helped 1,700 students afford the dream of a college education. If you are a DACA-recipient and you need some cash for college, you should totally give TheDream.US a visit.

Since 2014, TheDream.US has been partnering with educational institutions across the country to get more DACA students educated.

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There are a total of 77 college success programs, community colleges and universities in TheDream.US’ network of schools in 14 states and Washington, D.C. The institutions have to meet a criteria before the organization reaches out to offer the program with a focus on states and regions with a high population of DACA, undocumented and first-generation students.

“One of the things that we do is we look for colleges that show success and for us success means: that they are graduating students, they are either committed or will be DREAMer serving institutes or institutions,” Gaby Pacheco, an immigrant activist and the Program Director for Scholar Programs and Advocacy, told mitú. “We also look for partner colleges who have a history of serving low-income/first-generation students and we ask all of our partner colleges that, as their commitment, to provide a designated scholar advisor who is going to shepherd and help and support our students.”

Now, it’s important to know that the organization offers two kinds of scholarships: the National and the Opportunity Scholarship.

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“The whole idea is that the students who are [enrolled] can go to a community college, graduate and then go to a university,” Pacheco told mitú. “Or, instead of graduating from a community college, can just go to a university.”

The National Scholarship will award students up to $25,000 for four years.

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This scholarship will help to supplement DACA students who live in states where they can pay in-state tuition.

The Opportunity Scholarship will award up to $80,000 for four years.

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“For the opportunity scholarships, it’s a little bit different and the way the opportunity scholarships work is that we’ve targeted 16 states that either prevent people who have DACA to go to college or ask them to pay the out-of-state tuition, which makes it practically impossible for these students to afford the tuition,” Pacheco told mitú. “So, those students that live in those states can apply for those scholarships.”

The organization started with the help of a man named Don Graham.


“It all started because Don Graham had a scholarship program in DC and he would always hear about students who couldn’t go to college or couldn’t afford it,” Pacheco told mitú. “Being the fighter and being that person, at least here in DC that has been fighting like no other on insuring that people have access to education and higher education, he said, ‘We have to right this wrong.'”

Pacheco also mentioned that the talk of immigration reform becoming a viable policy spurred the organization to get things rolling to help students achieve their dreams.

Pacheco believes in the program because our job society places a higher value on education.

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“I went to college when I was undocumented and when I got DACA I was kind of ahead of the game of a lot of people because I had received an education and I could apply for the kinds of jobs the required bachelor’s degrees,” Pacheco told mitú. “So, it’s just a way to be ahead of the game for many things and, of course, a lot of young people have had those dreams to go to college and their dreams have been deferred because they don’t have access to the funding.”

And many immigration policies have education components.

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“On the immigration front, every piece of legislation that we’ve seen that specifically targets or talks about this population, there’s always an education component,” Pacheco told mitú. “We’re telling people that it’s just a way to get prepared for something that it’s been long-coming but we know, eventually, we’ll get here. With DACA, for example, people are now able to use their education that they have received.”

TheDream.US hopes to leave behind a legacy of educated people and educational institutions that will help similar students in the future.

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“Our goals are to leave behind over 4,000 graduates who can contribute to the socioeconomic prosperity of not just themselves or their families, but also the communities that they live in. We also want to leave behind institutions that are ready to serve these students and are ready to serve immigrants and can help beyond the students that we graduate as well,” Pacheco told mitú about the organization’s overall goal. “The other thing that we want to do is increase college access for these students. We shouldn’t have to do this, you know, colleges and universities like any other student that comes and live in the community should be providing them with the same tuition as anyone else.”

The application process for these scholarships is currently open and closes early 2017.

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The National Scholarship is open until March 8, 2017 and the Opportunity Scholarship closes February 1, 2017. So, if any of these scholarships apply to you, log onto thedream.us and fill out the application. There is so much money waiting for you.


READ: SCOTUS Immigration Case Will Impact Millions — Possibly Even You

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The Principal Of A Florida School Was Captured Spanking An Undocumented Six-Year-Old Student With A Paddle

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The Principal Of A Florida School Was Captured Spanking An Undocumented Six-Year-Old Student With A Paddle

Corporal punishment includes all sorts of cruel physical acts. They range from spanking, slapping, force-feeding, and pinching to pulling, twisting, and striking with an object. The act of corporal punishment has long been criticized for its part in causing greater damage than intended.

Though the effects might bring around immediate compliance, researchers have underlined that such changes in behavior are often only short-term and can increase aggressive behavior. Perhaps this is why the act has varying legal statuses across the country.

Elementary school principal Melissa Carter is learning her own lesson from corporal punishment, but not as the receiver.

The elementary school principal from Florida is being investigated by local authorities after her use of corporal punishment on a 6-year-old student was captured on camera.

Principal Melissa Carter and school clerk Cecilia Self used a paddle on the student last month as punishment for damaging a computer screen. According to local CBS affiliate WINK News, corporal punishment was performed on the child in front of their mother. The mother used her cell phone to record the paddling in a clip that has gone viral.

According to WINK News, a female employee from the school contacted the child’s mother on April 13 after her daughter allegedly damaged a computer.

The mother of the child, who speaks Spanish and not fluent English, said that she was confused by the allegations made against her daughter during the phone call. During the conversation the school employee had mentioned “paddling” but the mother didn’t understand what that meant because of her language barrier.

She had been under the impression that she had been brought to the school to pay a $50 fine. Instead, she was taken to Principal Carter’s office where her daughter and the principal were waiting.

Carter soon brought out a wooden paddle and smacked the six-year-old on the backside. The video recorded by the mothers shows the little girl crying in pain during the attack.   

The mother claimed she resisted intervening because she feared having her immigration status brought into question.

“Nobody would have believed me. I sacrificed my daughter, so all parents can realize what’s happening in this school,” told the local news about the incident. “The hatred with which she hit my daughter, I mean it was a hatred that, really I’ve never hit my daughter like she hit her. I had never hit her.”

Bret Provinsky, the mother’s attorney, said the State Attorney’s Office is currently reviewing the case to see whether they will pursue criminal charges against Carter and Cecilia Self.

Self was meant to translate for the mother, but the mother said she did not do so. “That’s aggravated battery. They’re using a weapon that can cause severe physical harm,” said Provinsky. “The child is terrified, she feels vulnerable. There’s nothing she can do in the hands of these adults, who treated her so brutally, savagely, sadistically.”

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Ecuadorian Sisters, 3 And 5, Dropped By Smugglers From 14 Ft High Mexico-US Border Wall

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Ecuadorian Sisters, 3 And 5, Dropped By Smugglers From 14 Ft High Mexico-US Border Wall

A recent video shared by a border patrol agent highlighted a shocking moment of smugglers literally dropping two little girls over a 14-foot high fence in the New Mexico desert. Right in the dead of night.

In the disturbing video, the smugglers can be seen climbing the fence and then dropping the two 5-year-old and 3-year-old sisters to the ground.

El Paso Sector Chief Patrol Agent Gloria Chavez shared that the incident occurred “miles from the nearest residence.”

The two little girls (Yareli, 3, and Yasmina, 5) were rescued after agents spotted them during a virtual surveillance sweep. The two sisters are from Ecuador and were dumped by human smugglers at the border wall according to an official.

“[US Immigration officials] need to verify the identity of the parents and confirm they are the parents and make sure they are in good condition to receive the girls,” Magdalena Nunez, of the Consulate of Ecuador in Houston, explained to The New York Post on Thursday. “It’s a process … We’re working to make sure it’s an expedited process and the girls spend as minimal time as possible separated from their parents.”

“Hopefully it can happen soon, in a week or two, but  it can take up to six weeks. We are working to make sure sure it happens as quickly as possible,” she explained before noting that the two sisters are “doing very well.”

“We have been in contact with them and confirmed they are in good health,” Nunez shared. “Physically, they are perfect — emotionally, obviously, they went through a hard time, but I guarantee you right now they are in good health and they are conversing. They are very alert, very intelligent.”

In a statement about the incident, the Ecuadorian consulate confirmed that the two girls had been in touch with their parents, who live in New York City.

“The Ecuadorian Consulate in Houston had a dialogue with the minors and found that they are in good health and that they contacted their parents, who currently live in New York City,” explained the consulate.

In a statement from the girls’ parents sent to Telemundo, the girls’ parents had left their daughters behind at their home in Jaboncillo, Ecuador, to travel to the US. The parents of the two girls have been identified as Yolanda Macas Tene and Diego Vacacela Aguilar. According to the New York Post, “The girls’ grandparents have asked President Biden to reunite the children with their parents. Aguilar paid a human smuggler to take his kids to the border — though the grandparents didn’t know how much they paid.”

“[The parents] wanted to be with them, their mother suffered a lot, for that reason they decided to take them,” paternal grandfather Lauro Vacacela explained in an interview with Univision.

It is still uncertain as to whether or not the girls’ parents are in the country legally.

Photos of the girls showed them having snacks with Agent Gloria Chavez.

“When I visited with these little girls, they were so loving and so talkative, some of them were asking the names of all the agents that were there around them, and they even said they were a little hungry,” Chavez told Fox News. “So I helped them peel a banana and open a juice box and just talked to them. You know, children are just so resilient and I’m so grateful that they’re not severely injured or [have] broken limbs or anything like that.”

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