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These Marriages will Piss You Off

Aracely was 11 when she married her husband, who was 34. Now 15, she is raising her son on her own. When Concha Mercedes López Raxtún got married at 17, she moved into her in-laws home, got pregnant and stopped going to school — and 36 years later, this is still the typical life of 30 percent of teenage women in Guatemala.

Today, Raxtún, a pastor in her town now, along with NGOs like Refugio de la Niñez and Too Young to Wed, are trying to raise awareness in Guatemala to help teenagers and their families make different decisions.

“We started to ask: What are the situations that affect girls culturally and socially, in regards to patriarchy and machismo?” said program director Sandra López. “What are the situations that make them vulnerable?” Their answer was teen marriage and everything that comes with it.

READ: Not Male, Not Female, but Muxe, Mexico’s Third Gender

Saidi (pictured above) was 15 when she married off.  She is now 16 and nine months pregnant. She told Stephanie Sinclair, for a photo essay in The New York Times, that her husband left for work four months ago…she has yet to hear from him.

70,000 teens under the age of 19 gave birth in Guatemala in the first eight months of 2015. That’s the highest rate compared to all of Latin America.

In an effort to help change the status quo, Guatemalan Congress changed the legal marriage age to 18 — before girls could legally marry at 14, although many are pushed to marriage as young as 12 years old — in hopes that young women will have better more options, including an education, in their futures.

See Stephanie Sinclair’s photo essay for ‘The New York Times’ here.

Read more about young brides in Guatemala here.

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Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Secret Son Eric Baena Was Seen in Public With His Half-Brother Patrick For the First Time

Entertainment

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Secret Son Eric Baena Was Seen in Public With His Half-Brother Patrick For the First Time

Photos via projoe2, patrickschwarzenegger

Over the weekend, some pictures surfaced of a sight we never thought we’d see. Two of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s sons, Patrick Schwarzenegger and Joseph Baena, were photographed together for the first time.

Patrick Schwarzenegger and Joseph Baena were photographed hiking in Santa Monica together. This is the first time the brothers had been seen in public together since Baena’s public reveal in 2011.

As a refresher, Joseph Baena is the love child of the former California Governor and his longtime Guatemalan housekeeper, Mildred Patricia “Patty” Baena. Patty worked for the Schwarzenegger family for 20 years without revealing her secret to anyone but Arnold himself.

Joseph’s existence was kept a secret for 14 years before Arnold’s wife, Maria Shriver, discovered the affair. Once she found out, she immediately filed for divorce. According to Arnold, he has provided for Joseph from the beginning. He even bought a luxurious four-bedroom house for Joseph and Patty in 2010.

“After leaving the governor’s office I told my wife about this event, which occurred over a decade ago,” Schwarzenegger said in a statement at the time. “I understand and deserve the feelings of anger and disappointment among my friends and family. There are no excuses and I take full responsibility for the hurt I have caused. I have apologized to Maria, my children and my family. I am truly sorry.”

Since the public learned of Joseph Baena, he has kept an active public profile.

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A post shared by Joseph Baena (@projoe2)

On social media, Joseph regularly posts thirst-traps of himself working out or practicing Brazilian jiu jitsu. The spitting image of his father, he is also a bodybuilder, and now, an aspiring actor.

Patrick Schwarzenegger, on the other hand, is a fairly successful actor in his own right. You can find him in movies like “Moxie“, “Midnight Sun”, and “Dear Eleanor”.

The pictures of Patrick Schwarzenegger and Joseph Baena are shocking because, up until this point, the public had no idea that the half-brothers even had a relationship.

But if there is any bad-blood between Patrick Schwarzenegger and Joseph Baena, the pictures don’t show it. Instead, they show a portrait of two normal brothers going on an unremarkable hike together in Santa Monica.

We’re glad that these two young men didn’t let the choice of their parents affect the relationship they’ve decided to have with each other. Hopefully, we’ll see more of the duo in public again.

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This Is How Cuba Is Developing Its Own COVID Vaccine When It Can Barely Get Daily Necessities To The Island

Things That Matter

This Is How Cuba Is Developing Its Own COVID Vaccine When It Can Barely Get Daily Necessities To The Island

Cuba has long been a biotech juggernaut in the Caribbean. When health crises emerge around the globe or there’s a medical disaster, Cuba is often one of the first nation’s to send medical staff and emergency workers to help. Its medical team has become part of the country’s diplomacy.

But the Coronavirus pandemic has brought economic devastation to a country already facing severe economic issues. Many on the island struggle to even find daily necessities like Tylenol or Band-Aids yet the Cuban government is just steps away from developing its own vaccine against COVID-19. How is this possible?

Cuban researches are making their own Coronavirus vaccine and seeing great results.

Currently on the island, there are five vaccine candidates in development, with two already in late-stage trials. Cuban officials say they’re developing cheap and easy-to-store serums. They are able to last at room temperature for weeks, and in long-term storage as high as 46.4 degrees, potentially making them a viable option for low-income, tropical countries that have been pushed aside by bigger, wealthier nations in the international race for coronavirus vaccines.

If they’re successful and developing and rolling out the vaccine, Cuba – a country where the average scientific researcher earns about $250 a month — could be among the first nations in the world to reach herd immunity, putting it in a position to lure vaccine tourists and to export surpluses of what officials claim could reach 100 million doses by year’s end.

If they pull this off, it would be a big win for the communist government.

Achieving success would be an against-the-odds feat of medical science and a public relations win for the isolated country of 11 million people. Cuba was just added back to the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism in the final days of the Trump administration.

It could also make Cuba the pharmacist for nations lumped by Washington into the so-called “Axis of Evil.” Countries like Iran and Venezuela have already inked vaccine deals with Havana. Iran has even agreed to host a Phase 3 trial of one of Cuba’s most promising candidates — Soberana 2 — as part of a technology transfer agreement that could see millions of doses manufactured in Iran.

“We have great confidence in Cuban medical science and biotechnology,” Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza told The Washington Post this week. “It will not only be fundamental for Venezuela, but for the Americas. It will be the true solution for our people.”

So how is Cuba managing to pull this off despite all the challenges they face?

Cuba is an authoritarian, one-party state with strict controls on everything from free speech and political activism to social media and LGBTQ rights. But the island has always invested heavily in education and healthcare, which has led to an unusually sophisticated biotechnology industry for a small developing country, with at least 31 research companies and 62 factories with over 20,000 workers.

Should Cuba’s vaccines succeed, its researchers will have overcome even more hurdles than their peers in Western labs — including shortages of equipment, spare parts and other supplies, due in part to U.S. sanctions

A successful vaccine could also become a vital new source of revenue for Cuba, which has been suffering a brutal economic crisis that has citizens waiting hours in line to buy scarce food, soap and toothpaste. The economy worsened under Trump-era sanctions that tightened the long-standing U.S. economic embargo of Cuba by curbing remittances, scaling back U.S. flights, ending cruise ship passenger traffic and further complicating Cuba’s access to the global financial system. President Biden has called for a possible return to Obama-era policies, but he has made no such moves yet.

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