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Hate Hispanic Heritage Month? This Is How You Can Reclaim it

Credit: Voto Latino/YouTube

What better way to celebrate than by making your voice heard?

Today kicks off National Hispanic Heritage Month, the 30-day long federally recognized period that’s supposed to highlight and honor the many contributions Latinos have made to American society, but often results in ill-conceived tokenism on the part of brands and organizations. As you, dear readers, indicated on Twitter when we posed the question, you have mixed feelings about the event. This is what you had to say on the subject:

Credit: @christinaixchel/Twitter
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Credit: @karlitaliliana/Twitter

So what do you do with something that’s supposed to pay tribute to you and yours, but you’re kind of meh about the whole idea in the first place? You make it work for you. That’s exactly what Voto Latino, Mi Familia Vota, and iAmerica–three dope organizations doing good in this world–are trying to do with “Hispanic Heritage Month of Action,” a new campaign that will shift the focus of Hispanic Heritage Month away from the half-assed acknowledgments that we exist into something that could show this country that we are a force not to be trifled with.

As their website notes, Hispanic Heritage Month happens to coincide with a lot of states’ deadlines for voter registration. There are currently 27.3 million eligible Latino voters for this upcoming election. Nearly half of those are millennials. We’re the future face of America. We are destined for greatness, but that will only happen if we let our presence be known.


READ: Latina Girl Slapped For Allegedly Not Putting Hand Over Heart During National Anthem

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Mexico's "Creepiest" Director Gets His Own Exhibit At LACMA

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Mexico’s “Creepiest” Director Gets His Own Exhibit At LACMA

CREDIT: ERIC WOLFGANG / INSTAGRAM

Fans of oddities and horror are no doubt more than familiar with the works of Guillermo Del Toro. For the last few decades, the Guadalajara-born director (“Hellboy,” “Pan’s Labyrinth,” and most recently, “Crimson Peak”) has delighted movie goers around the globe with his fantastic imagination. So it should come as no surprise that the Los Angeles County Museum of Arts (LACMA) is honoring Del Toro’s vision with his very own “At Home With The Monsters” exhibit. If you’re a fan and you’re in the Los Angeles area, you have through November 27 to check out the exhibition, but if you can’t make it, have no fear, mitú is here to give you a taste of what you’re missing.

LACMA is a huge place. Thankfully, the museum figured out a way to keep fans from getting lost.

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CREDIT: MME.QUARTER / INSTAGRAM

Upon entering, the first thing visitors see is a large statue of the Angel Of Death from “Hellboy 2: The Golden Army.”

CREDIT: RUBIDOSANJH / INSTAGRAM

This is easily the creepiest angel since Criss Angel.

The second statue you’ll see is everyone’s favorite faun from “Pan’s Labyrinth.”

CREDIT: JACQUELYN40 / INSTAGRAM

Don’t let the dagger scare you off. He’s cool for a photo op.

There are several interesting pieces of art near the entrance, but this photo of a young Del Toro explains a lot.

CREDIT: CPIEPER / INSTAGRAM

A face only a mother could love.

The Pale Man  — probably one of the scariest monsters in the entire exhibit — was also one of the crowd’s favorites.

CREDIT: _NOCTIS_ / INSTAGRAM

Talk to the hand.

One of the parasites from “Pacific Rim” was just chillin’ in a glass case.

CREDIT: KITTY CASS 13 /INSTAGRAM

I hope someone has some industrial strength Raid.

The exhibit doesn’t just stick to Guillermo’s art. Work from artists who have influenced Del Toro are also prominently displayed, like the “Birth Machine Baby” from H.R. Giger.

CREDIT: SPACEOH / INSTAGRAM

You might not recognize the name, but Giger is the artistic-lunatic behind “Alien.”

There were also less obvious influences, like famed Disney artist Eyvind Earle.

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This art from “Sleeping Beauty” is one of the many Earle pieces on display. Pictures do not do his work justice.

Stephen Gammell’s work in the “Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark” was proudly displayed.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BKMf4IVhSf5/?tagged=stephengammell

CREDIT: BRITBRET / INSTAGRAM

This was in a children’s book?

These amazing glimpses of hell were created by Flemish printmaker Pieter van der Heyden.

CREDIT: RECESS COLLECTIVE / INSTAGRAM

Seems like a well-adjusted artist.

Fans are given a behind the scenes look at Boris Karloff, who played the monster in “Frankenstein.”

CREDIT: JASON HAROLD PHOTO / INSTAGRAM

Other statues include this one of Edgar Allen Poe.

CREDIT: MEGGALODON / INSTAGRAM

Got ’em.

And this one of H.P. Lovecraft.

CREDIT: KITTYCASS 13 / INSTAGRAM

The creator of Cthulhu seems like he’s a good mood.

The delightful Schlitze warmed everyone’s hearts with his amazing smile.

CREDIT: RICARDOH PHOTOGRAPHY / INSTAGRAM

There’s even a wing devoted to Mexican wrestling, including this amazing piece of history: the actor’s card belonging to legendary luchador El Santo.

CREDIT: MR LOPEZ PEREZ / INSTAGRAM

The entire exhibit is an amazing experience. If you’re a fan of Del Toro or any of the art featured above, do yourself a favor and get down to the LACMA before this exhibit ends. If you can’t make it, Instagram is a great place to see all the odds and ends available at the museum.


READ: A Museum In Mexico City Is Hanging Shoes To Honor Thousands Of Missing People