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Of Course Mexicans Are Mad At This Election, Gael Garcia Explains

CREDIT: THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT / CBS

When politicians and pundits talk about how to address immigration, it’s always from the U.S. point of view. That’s why it’s important for people like Gael Garcia Bernal to bring their perspectives as a Mexican citizens to a wider audience. In his recent “Late Show”appearance, Bernal delved less into the political side of the argument and instead focused on humanizing people who choose to immigrate.

“The journey that these [immigrants] are doing is the most benign journey there is,” Gael told Colbert. “Because they’re trying to make their future better, which means the future of humanity.”

CREDIT: HAMILTON / CBS

“Immigration,” Gael added, “is a natural phenomenon — it’s the reason why humans still exist on Earth.” Considering the subject matter of the interview, Gael’s likable presence kept things from getting too heavy. However, Bernal hasn’t shied away from diving in deeper during other interviews.

In a recent interview with Thrillist, Gael expanded on what it means for Mexicans when they watch the rhetoric from this election.

CREDIT: REALDONALDTRUMP / INSTAGRAM

“There’s nothing more false than the United States being a victim of the world or being a victim of Mexico,” he told Thrillist. Garcia added: “It’s constructed on lies completely, and the whole world mocks that — but at the same time, we’re really worried about what the fuck is going to happen.”

But it wasn’t always that way, Gael explained to Colbert, that Mexicans didn’t take Trump serious at first.

CREDIT: THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT / CBS

Garcia explained his early reaction to Trump: “At the beginning, there was an ignoring factor, because it was like ‘Is this a joke? This must not be real. What’s going on?'” Colbert assured Gael, “That was the reaction here, too.” One thing to note, denial is the first form of grief, and Gael had no idea how much grief would come Mexico’s way in the form of Donald Trump’s agenda.

Gael told Colbert about the growing frustration Mexicans feel with how their government will act with Trump.

CREDIT: RIGHT SIDE BROADCASTING / YOUTUBE

“The way that our government has treated that issue, the way that the hate speech that [Trump] has been spreading, something that our government in Mexico hasn’t done a good job of stopping […] So we are very upset about it.”

Back in August, Enrique Peña Nieto, Mexico’s current president, met with Trump in a press conference that was widely hailed as a “public relations disaster.”

CREDIT: Bloomberg Politics / Instagram

Mexico’s President threw away his chance to confront Trump on several issues, but instead acted like an obedient lacky of Trump as the world watched on. Critics contended the event was a poorly orchestrated publicity stunt that hurt both men’s reputation.

Trumps comments are easy to condemn, but Hillary’s lack of comments hasn’t gone under Gael’s radar.

CREDIT: GAELGARCIAB / TWITTER

Gael told Thrillist, “The Democrats are willing to remain silent in many ways. And that just blows my mind because then the narrative is established: It’s allowed to say that migrants are really bad and everybody sort of believes that.”

As election noise grows louder on both sides of the border, Gael’s message is to the point, “I think anyone that can give a rational explanation for why they’re voting for Donald Trump is a person that definitely doesn’t exist.”

CREDIT: Movieclips Trailers / YOUTUBE

“It’s a very emotional vote,” Gael told Thrillist. “It’s a very irrational vote. The world is brokenhearted and some people are solving it through empathy and through a sense of common good, and some others are reacting to that brokenheartedness by creating resentment.”


READ: Gael García Bernal’s “Late Show” Appearance Turned Trump’s Wall Upside Down

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Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Culture

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Over the last few years, Mexico has been updated its currency to make it more secure from counterfeiters and to highlight the country’s diverse history. One of the country’s newest bills is a $100 peso note featuring a 17th-Century female historical figure and it’s winning major international awards for its design and history.

Mexico’s $100-peso bill has been named banknote of the year for 2020 by the International Bank Note Society (IBNS). As printer and issuer of the note, the Bank of México beat 24 other nominees to the award, and the Sor Juana bill led the way from the start of the voting process.

The note features national heroine Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, with the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve on its reverse.

In its announcement the IBNS wrote: “Mexico’s award-winning entry may provide a template as other countries reconsider how they design and promote new banknotes.  The successful design in eye-pleasing red combines Hispanic architecture, a famous female Hispanic literary figure and a tribute to the world’s fragile ecosystem.”

Past bank note of the year recipients include Aruba, Canada, Uganda, the Faroe Islands, two time winner Switzerland and three time winner Kazakhstan, among others.

So who was Sor Juana and why was she important to Mexico?

Born in 1651, Sor Juana was a self-educated nun and intellectual renowned for her poetry, writing and political activism, who criticized the misogyny of colonial Mexico.

Beginning her studies at a young age, Sor Juana was fluent in Latin and also wrote in Nahuatl, and became known for her philosophy in her teens. Sor Juana educated herself in her own library, which was mostly inherited from her grandfather. After joining a nunnery in 1667, Sor Juana began writing poetry and prose dealing with such topics as love, feminism, and religion.

Mexico was up against 24 other countries in the nomination process.

In second place was Kate Cranston who appears on the Bank of Scotland’s 20 pound note. The businesswoman appears on the obverse and she is recognized for being the owner of the famous tea rooms inaugurated in 1903 and that today are a tourist attraction.

In third place there was a triple tie between the 20 pound note of the Ulster Bank of Northern Ireland whose design features flora and buskers. The one from the Bahamas of 5 dollars with the image of the junkanoo dancer, and the one of 50 dollars from Fiji.

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Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Things That Matter

Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Residents of one Mexican city have taken to the streets to demand justice for a local stray dog who was brutally killed in an axe attack last month. Video of the incident was uploaded to social media and quickly went viral, leading to large protests in the Sinaloan city of Los Mochis.

Hundreds marched in Los Mochis to seek justice for a dog killed by man with an axe.

Hundreds took to the streets in Los Mochis, Sinaloa to demand justice for Rodolfo, a mixed breed dog killed with an axe on March 21. They showed banners that read “Justice for Rodolfo & for all who have no voice,” “We won’t stop until we have justice,” and “Justice for Rodolfo,” among others.

Despite the COVID-19 regulations, the participants in this new march, children, women and men, calmly marched through the center of the city of Los Mochis to make it clear that they are against animal cruelty and demanded justice for Rodolfo, who was a local stray dog. The demonstration gained traction after a video of the attack on Rodolfo, also known by Heart, Pirate and Shorty, was uploaded onto social media.

The predominantly young crowd marched to the state prosecutor’s office where environmental activist Arturo Islas Allende delivered a criminal complaint. Many brought their pets to the march and carried placards demanding the killer be sentenced to prison. One placard read: “Justice for Rodolfo and for all those that don’t have a voice.”

The suspected attacker, José “M,” a student at a Sinaloa university, has already delivered a preparatory statement to officials. Islas Allende questioned the morality of the killer. “We don’t want a psychopath like him as our neighbor,” he said.

The suspect’s girlfriend claimed that he killed the dog to protect her.

The girlfriend of the alleged attacker took to social media in his defense, saying the dog had attacked her days earlier and injured her face and hands.

On her Facebook account she claimed that medical treatments for her injuries had cost 8,000 pesos (US $400) and uploaded photographs of the injuries caused by the dog’s bites.

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