Things That Matter

Forbes Just Released Their 30 Under 30 List And These Latinos Are Among The Honorees

For the last six years, Forbes has been putting together their 30 Under 30 list, which they say offers “an annual opportunity to embrace the optimism, inventiveness and boldness of youth.” There are 20 different lists across 20 industries for a total of 600 honorees and if you’re wondering whether any Latinos made the cut, the answer is “¡claro que sí!” Here are just a few of them.

Bethany Mota, 21

Credit: bethanynoelm/Instagram

Aside from being a YouTube-vlogging extraordinaire with more than 26 million followers across social media, Mota is an entrepreneur who has partnered with Aeropostale, Forever 21, and Target. Oh, you may have also seen her on season 19 of “Dancing With the Stars.”

Gabriel Mesa, 16

Gabriel Mesa #0 Under 30
Credit: wtnh.com

What were you doing when you were 16? At 16, Mesa has already invented the Carbon Battery and a piezo-powered treatment for diabetic neuropathy. Mind blowing, right?

Melissa Villaseñor, 29

J-Lo gets real about why she brought Marc Anthony on stage the other night… ??? #jenniferlopez #marcanthony #skinnybonejones

A post shared by Melissa Villaseñor (@melissavcomedy) on

Credit: melissavcomedy/Instagram

Hallelujah, “Saturday Night Live” has a Latina cast member and her name is Melissa Villaseñor. Her celebrity impressions are, well, impressive. Her J.Lo is almost TOO good.

Miguel Garza, 29

We're headed to California! Expo West booth H535 come visit us Thursday-Saturday! #expowest

A post shared by Siete Family Foods (@sietefoods) on

Credit: sietefoods/Instagram

Garza’s sister Veronica started making almond flour tortillas because she has an auto-immune disease that prohibits her from eating any grains. Miguel knew the tortillas were ready to satisfy the cravings of a bigger group of people once they got his abuelita’s seal of approval. He started selling the tortillas to grocery stores and co-founded Siete Family Foods, which now brings in over $1 million a year.

Eliana Murillo, 28

Eliana Murillo 30 Under 30
Credit: eliana_murillo/Twitter

Harvard grad, Head of Multicultural Marketing at Google (yes, the Google) and CMO of her family’s organic tequila company, Tequila Alquimia.


See everyone who scored a spot on the lists here.

Oye, before you go don’t forget to share this post with your friends by pressing the button below. 

If You Haven’t Seen Real Women Have Curves, Here’s A Breakdown Of Why It’s So Important

Entertainment

If You Haven’t Seen Real Women Have Curves, Here’s A Breakdown Of Why It’s So Important

Newmarket Films

For so many young Latinas, Real Women Have Curves was a glorious cinematic anthem of self-confidence, self-worth, and following your dreams. Although its messages of self-acceptance were lauded by women of all identities and backgrounds, it follows a young Mexican-American girl (played by the fabulous America Ferrera) on her journey to adulthood, centering on issues that affect a lot of Latinx folks to this day. Ferrera’s character, Ana García, feels like a direct representation of so many young Latina women, in particular, struggling to not only love themselves, but to receive they respect they deserve in their own country.

If you haven’t seen Real Women Have Curves, here’s a breakdown of why it’s so important.

Credit: Shuttershock

The protagonist, 18-year-old Ana García, lives in LA with her family, who own and operate a small textile factory. Ana has big dreams of leaving her family’s tough financial situation behind in pursuit of a college education—and while Ana’s sister and father support her ambitions, her mother is resistant, insisting that Ana stay home and help keep the family afloat. Meanwhile, Ana’s high school teacher, Mr. Guzman (played by none other than George Lopez) encourages her to apply to Columbia University, despite her belief that she shouldn’t bother because her family can’t afford tuition. Yet Mr. Guzman continues to persist, even speaking directly to Ana’s family at her graduation party and urging them to let her apply to college.

Over the course of the movie, Ana is not just faced with her mother’s harsh attitude about her future, but also about her body.

After receiving constant reminders about not eating too much cake, or about being too promiscuous, Ana finally breaks, challenging her mother’s emotionally abusive behavior in what is perhaps the movie’s most famous scene.

Credit: Newmarket Films

In this scene, Ana and her fellow factory workers begin removing their clothes in an attempt to cool off. Standing there in their underwear, Ana and the other women examine each other’s bodies, comparing their “flaws”—only to realize that their bodies are not flawed at all. They display their stretch marks, their cellulite, their different shapes and silhouettes. They realize how truly natural and normal their own bodies are, and they help each other celebrate their uniqueness. When Ana’s mother throws a fit and leaves the factory complaining about her family and her employees’ shamelessness, Ana revels in this moment of rebellion, acknowledging that they are women, and this is who they truly are—real women with real curves.

At the end of the movie, Ana is faced with the inevitable and difficult decision we anticipated all along: she is accepted into Columbia University on a scholarship, and she must choose whether to stay or go. At first, her mother’s adamant opposition convinces her to stay, but she ultimately realizes that she must be true to herself, and after ensuring her father’s full support, Ana departs for her new life in New York City.

In 2002, Real Women Have Curves was monumental in its realistic portrayal of a common paradigm for Latinx folks—the pressures (and joys) of family often competing with other dreams and ambitions, as well as the pressures that US society often unfairly places on Latina women and their bodies.

Credit: Newmarket Films

And the thing is—this film is still relevant, still relatable, and still powerful. Released as an indie feature from director Patricia Cardoso, it remains an inspiring representation of female empowerment, showing the complexities of familial relationships and the importance of supporting the people close to you. It also demonstrates the importance of honoring yourself, even if the circumstances make it difficult (or nearly impossible) to do so. The messages conveyed in Real Women Have Curves are fundamental to the human experience, and will surely remain topical and relevant far into the future.

In fact, in recognition of its immense social and cultural impact, Real Women Have Curves was just added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry. The National Film Registry selects 25 films each year showcasing the range and diversity of American film heritage to increase awareness for its preservation. So, this is a pretty big deal.

The addition of Real Women Have Curves adds undeniable dimension and diversity to the current portfolio of films on the National Registry. In addition to this Latino indie classic, Luis Valdez’s 1981 musical, Zoot Suit, was also added this year. Valdez is considered the father of Chicano theater, and this play tells the story of the famed zoot suit riots and Sleepy Lagoon murder case that captivated Los Angeles back in the 1940s. Starring Edward James Olmos and Tyne Daley, Zoot Suit was nominated for a Golden Globe in 1982, and if you haven’t seen it, it’s definitely worth a watch.

And if you haven’t seen Real Women Have Curves in a while, now’s a good time to revisit it and remind yourself why it will remain important for decades to come!

Latinos Have A Long History Of Being Nominated At The Academy Awards With Some Major Wins

Entertainment

Latinos Have A Long History Of Being Nominated At The Academy Awards With Some Major Wins

Getty Images

“Roma” is obviously the talk of the town leading up to the Academy Awards ceremony, but Latino talent has made itself heard for decades. Actors, directors and cinematic craftspeople have been nominated and sometimes been declared the winners. For example, Mexican directors have won four out of the last five Best Director Oscars. Here’s a list of some of the standouts of Latino origin in Oscar’s famed history. This year “Roma” could indeed make history as the first Spanish-language film to win as Best Picture.

Here’s a brief look into the history of Latinos are the Oscars and the wins and nominations that validated our work in the industry.

Salma Hayek: nominated for “Frida”

Category: Best Actress in a Leading Role

Year: 2002

Credit: Frida / Miramax Films

Now that the can of worms concerning Harvey Weinstein is open and that we know that he bullied Salma all throughout the production of this film, we are even prouder of her. She gave us a performance for the ages despite the dire circumstances in which she had to embody Mexico’s most famous painter.

Guillermo Del Toro: nominated for “Pan’s Labyrinth” (El laberinto del fauno)

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 2006

Credit: Pan’s Labyrinth / Estudios Picasso, Wild Bunch, Tequila Gang

Del Toro first got the spotlight with this amazing fantasy film. He didn’t win, losing to the German “The Lives of Others,” but he certainly made an impact.

 

Adriana Barraza: nominated for “Babel”

Category: Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Year: 2006

Credit: Babel / Paramount Pictures

The veteran telenovela actress impressed us with her portrayal of a nanny caught in the midst of a terrible twist of fate. Her character was tender, yet brave.

Benicio del Toro: win for “Traffic”

Category: Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Year: 2001

Credit: Traffic / Compulsion Inc.

We can forgive this Puerto Rican actor his fake Tijuana accent. Through his imposing figure, he could really communicate the violence and despair involved in the cartel wars, north and south of the border.

Guillermo Del Toro: win for “The Shape of Water”

Categories: Best Director and Best Picture

Year: 2018

Credit: guillermo-del-toro-shape-of-water-bts. Digital image. Variety.

His reimagining of fairy tales set in the Cold War era is an impressive feat, a lovely ode to the monsters he loves. It is a spectacular achievement in film.

Alfonso Cuarón: win for “Gravity”

Category: Best Director

Year: 2014

Credit: cuaron_gravity. Digital image. Variety

This movie is a miracle. Not even Stanley Kubrick had made us feel like we were in space. Cuarón’s mastery of cinematic space left the Academy speechless and for good reason.

Alejandro González Iñárritu: win for “Birdman”

Categories: Best Director and Best Picture

Year: 2015

Credit: birdman-alejandro-gonzc3a1lez-ic3b1c3a1rritu. Digital image. Variety.

The Mexican director had already been nominated for “Babel,” but with “Birdman” he actually had fun! And it shows. His take on the state of the movie industry won the top prizes in the 2015 ceremony and established him as a powerhouse in Hollywood.

Alejandro González Iñárritu: win for “The Revenant”

Category: Best Director

Year: 2016

Credit: therevenantinterview-932×501. Digital image. Deadline.

Oops, I did it again. Yes, the director repeated the feat with this extremely violent yet beautiful film that also gave Leonardo DiCaprio his first Oscar after tons of nominations.

Juan J. Campanella: win for “The Secret in Their Eyes” (El secreto de sus ojos)

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 2010

Credit: The Secret in Their Eyes / Tornasol Films

This is perhaps one of the best Latin American films ever made. A brainy and emotional take on the scars that the military dictatorship on Argentina left for people to deal with. Ricardo Darin is in his element, a true acting legend.

Demián Bichir: nominated for “A Better Life”

Category: Best Actor in a Leading Role

Year: 2012

Credit: A Better Life / Summit Entertainment

An important film about migration gave Bichir the opportunity to shine. He is an illegal worker who fights the system in order to be able to care for his son. Heartbreaking. Brace yourselves for a year or two in the not-so-happy ending.

Anthony Quinn: nominated for “Zorba the Greek”

Category: Best Actor in a Leading Role

Year: 1965

Credit: Zorba the Greek / Twentieth Century Fox

The Mexican actor is a true Hollywood legend and this is perhaps his most famous role. Ask your abuelito and he wi will start singing and dancing to Greek music. Believe us.

Fernanda Montenegro: nominated for “Central Station” (Central Do Brasil)

Category: Best Actress in a Leading Role

Year: 1999

Credit: Central Station / Audiovisual Development Bureau, Ministerio da Cultura, BEI Comunicações

The veteran Brazilian actress was vulnerable and heroic in her portrayal of a woman who cares for a lost child.

 

Catalina Sandino Moreno: nominated for “Maria Full of Grace”

Category: Best Actress in a Leading Role

Year: 2004

Credit: Maria Full of Grace / HBO Films

This Colombian actress came out of nowhere to gather a nomination for portraying a drug mule who also happens to be pregnant. She is wise beyond her years.

Rita Moreno: win for “West Side Story”

Category: Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Year: 1962

Credit: West Side Story / The Mirisch Corporation

What an energetic Latina goddess! If you haven’t watched this classic musical, do it a la voz de ya!

Gabriel Figueroa: nominated for “The Night of the Iguana”

Category: Best Cinematography

Year: 1965

Credit: The Night of the Iguana / MGM

The veteran Mexican cinematographer shot this John Huston movie and showed everyone why the Golden Era of Mexican cinema had produced such amazing images.

Rodrigo Prieto: nominated for “Brokeback Mountain”

Category: Best Cinematography

Year: 2005

Credit: brokeback-mountain-lg. Digital image. MovieStillsDB

Alongside Guillermo Navarro and Emmanuel Lubezki, Prieto has shown that Mexican cinematographers are a force to be reckoned with. He worked with Ang Lee to produce majestic images of the American West as the backdrop of perhaps the most celebrated mainstream queer romance of all time.

Guillermo Navarro: win for “Pan’s Labyrinth”

Category: Best Cinematography

Year: 2006

Credit: Pan’s Labyrinth / Estudios Picasso, Wild Bunch, Tequila Gang

What an amazing win for Navarro. He had been working in the Mexican film industry for quite some time, but it was his careful rendition of Guillermo Del Toros feverish imagination what got him the coveted statue.

Fernando Meirelles: nominated for “City of God”

Category: Best Director

Year: 2003

Credit: 7AN54PJB6VFS7N6R6KJULBL2RU. Digital image. Los Angeles Times.

Energetic and punchy: “City of God” injected new energy to Brazilian cinema and made Hollywood look at a forgotten national film industry. Meirelles went on to build a fruitful career in Hollywood.

Carlos Saura: nominated for “Tango”

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 1999

Credit: Tango / Adela Pictures

The most Argentinian film you can think of. Elegant costumes, dramatic plots and dance moves that will make you sweat. With this nomination, Saura established himself as the leading director of his generation.

Claudia Llosa: nominated for “The Milk of Sorrow” (La teta asustada)

Category: Best Foreign Language Film

Year: 2010

Credit: The Milk of Sorrow / Generalitat de Catalunya – Institut Català de les Indústries Culturals (ICIC)

This Peruvian movie deals with the problems and joys of being a Latin American woman. A great film about the new role of Latinas, who are mothers, carers and independent women.

Emmanuel Lubezki: win for “Gravity,” “Birdman,” and “The Revenant.”

Category: Best Cinematography

Years: 2013, 2014, 2015

Credit: Emmanuel-Lubezki-Failing-Mentorless.com_-e1457105662609. Digital image. Mentorless.

After having gone home Oscar-less five times, Lubezki took three in a row. He has worked with the best directors in the world, including Tim Burton, Terrence Malick and obviously Cuarón and González Iñárritu.


READ: ‘Roma’ Leads With Ten Oscar Nominations Including For First Time Actress Yalitza Aparicio

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