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Is ‘Narcos’ Even Close Real? This Colombian that Grew Up During the Time of Escobar Weighs In

At the height of Pablo Escobar’s reign, Bernardo Aparicio García was enjoying his childhood in Colombia. He recounts those years during the narcoterrorism era in a first person essay for Vox.com, that and his thoughts on Netflix original series Narcos.

“The bizarre thing about living in Colombia during the ’80s and ’90s was how normal it seemed to be,” says García. “My childhood was in many ways indistinguishable from that of an American boy in an upper-middle-class suburb.”

WATCH: Yo, Pablo Escobar is Pretty F’n Scary in this Dark, Violent Trailer for ‘Narcos’

Those were his memories, but after a group of coworkers kept buzzing about all the plot twists of the much-talked about series, García finally gave in and gave the show a try. Perhaps the decision would have help him in his  walk down memory lane?

“Watching Narcos seemed like grabbing a bag of popcorn and watching my country burn,” confesses García. “I remember the utter fear I had of Escobar as a child, and I remember the glorious sense of relief I felt the day he was finally vanquished. It was as if Satan and all his hosts had been defeated for good. With each episode of Narcos, the memories keep coming. One of the most eye-opening things about watching Narcos was realizing how significantly the drug wars shaped my world, despite my parents’ best efforts to insulate me.”

For all the debate on the authenticity of the series and specualtion it perpetuates stereoptypes of Colombia, García applauds Narcos.

“The mere fact that a show like this exists is evidence of how far we have come. Violence and the drug trade still play a part in the country’s public life.”
Read Garcia’s full essay, here.

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Bad Bunny Is Set to Make His Acting Debut In the Upcoming Season of ‘Narcos: Mexico’

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Is Set to Make His Acting Debut In the Upcoming Season of ‘Narcos: Mexico’

Photo: David Becker/Getty Images for LARAS

There’s a new Hollywood actor in town and his name is Bad Bunny. That’s right, Netflix just announced that the Puerto Rican reggaeton artist is going to have a supporting role in the third season of “Narcos: Mexico”. Yes, we may still be sad over Diego Luna leaving the beloved Netflix franchise, but having Bad Bunny on screen is more than a good enough consolation prize.

Bad Bunny initially teased his involvement with the show when he graced the cover of “Rolling Stone” in May, saying that he would be a “supporting actor” in the upcoming season. Entertainment outlets have now reported that Bad Bunny will play Arturo “Kitty” Paez, a member of the “Narco Junior” gang run by Ramon Arellano Felix (Manuel Masalva). The role is supposed to be a relatively small one.

According to Netflix, the Narco Junior gang is made up of “rich, well connected kids from upper society who fell in with the cartel life for the money, drugs, and violence.” We can totally see Bad Bunny doing this.

The newest season is supposed to set in Mexico of the 1990s when the illegal drug trade started to really globalize. The series will follow “a new generation of Mexican kingpins” who fight for power after Felix Gallardo’s empire “splinters”. Sounds like juicy stuff!

Bad Bunny started shooting his scenes in Mexico right after he joined Shakira and Jennifer Lopez during the Superbowl halftime show in February. But shortly after he arrived in Mexico, production promptly shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. For his part, Bad Bunny didn’t seem so sad about the delay, saying that he “needed the rest” after such an intense year. But thankfully for us, it appears the production finally wrapped and the show is headed for our smalls screens! We can’t wait to see if he’s as talented at acting as he is at music.

Naturally, Bad Bunny fans couldn’t help but stan over the news.

Some people were already huge fans of “Narcos: Mexico” and this casting announcement just cemented their love for the show.

As Netflix probably wanted, the announcement grabbed the attention of people who had never even seen the show before.

Tweets like this prove that this was a smart casting decision.

But other fans were suspicious, having been burnt before by so-called celebrity “cameos”.

This sort of reminds us when they hyped Cardi B’s role in “Hustlers” for weeks and then she only appeared for a few minutes.

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Pablo Escobar’s Opens Up About Being Rescued By An MI6 Agent During A Shootout That Killed His Mom

Things That Matter

Pablo Escobar’s Opens Up About Being Rescued By An MI6 Agent During A Shootout That Killed His Mom

BBC Newsnight / YouTube

Pablo Escobar is one of the most notorious drug lords to ever be. Years later, his story continues to unfold and this time it is because of his first-born son who was adopted by an MI6 agent.

A man in Europe has come forward as Pablo Escobar’s long-lost first-born son.

Roberto Sendoya Escobar, who lives in Mallorca, Spain under his adopted name of Phillip Witcomb, first found out that he was Pablo Escobar’s son in 1989. His adoptive father, an MI6 agent, told him when he was 24. Since then, Roberto Escobar has been trying to figure out how to absorb this identity into his life.

In an interview with BBC Newsnight, Roberto admitted to never really knowing who Pablo was at first.

After his adoptive father told him the news, Roberto had to do some research to figure out who Pablo was. However, Roberto did spend time going back to Colombia with his dad and met Pablo. The reason was that his adoptive father was still trying to keep Pablo close for his own undercover work.

“I just remember the smell of the guy and I also remember, to be honest with you, a bit intimidated,” Roberto recalls. “I was quite a young child and I didn’t really understand what was going on.”

While he barely remembers, Roberto’s adoptive dad rescued him after a shoot out that killed his mom.

In his interview with BBC Newsnight, Roberto says he doesn’t remember the shoot out because he was an infant. However, he does have random moments of remembering big flashes of the gunfight but nothing of a coherent memory of the shooting.

It was during that shootout that Roberto’s adoptive father discovered him and adopted him. When Roberto was older he was sent to boarding school in the U.K. and grew up as part of the Witcomb family.

You can watch the rest of the interview and learn about the series of events leading to the revelation.

Realy goes to show that some people have a lot to learn about their own pasts. Some times things are not close to what they seem.

READ: Pablo Escobar Once Had Four Pet Hippos, Now There’s More Than 80 And They’re Destroying Colombia’s Ecosystem

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