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Feds Spending Nearly Half Million Dollars to Get Fat Latinos to Exercise

If you’re a Mexican man and receive a text telling you to exercise, don’t panic.  It’s just the feds.

This is not a hoax.  The feds are maybe — probably, definitely — watching you and they know you’re not moving your a$$. You see, the texts are supposed to encourage you to put down the taco and get your booty in shape, because “Mexican-American men report high rates of inactivity and related health conditions,” says the National Institute of Health.

READ: Danny Trejo Opens Taco Restaurant, but How Authentic is It?

It’s all part of a study (yes, they’re using you for a good cause) to get Latino men who “have limited access to public health interventions promoting physical activity” to get healthier. The low-cost strategy — or texts — will cost around $400,000, but if it works, they’ll expand it to help others.

So, come on, drop down and give the feds 10, ‘cause you got a lot of catching-up to do.

Read more about the study here.

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Maluma Lands Cover Of “Elle” And Talks About Why It’s So Hard To Make New Friends

Entertainment

Maluma Lands Cover Of “Elle” And Talks About Why It’s So Hard To Make New Friends

It seems like Maluma has long gotten the short end of the stick. As J Balvin and Bad Bunny rocketed to international superstardom, Colombian pop star Maluma hasn’t quite enjoyed the same level of mainstream recognition that they have. I mean who can forget his snub at the 2019 Met Gala…that was just heartbreaking to watch.

Although he’s just landed the cover of Elle magazine (the first time it’s ever featured a man), many are still asking why a pop star as talented and gorgeous as Maluma hasn’t reached the same level of fame? Well, in his interview with Elle, we get a few answers to some of world’s most pressing questions for Maluma.

Maluma has become the first ever man on the cover of Elle magazine.

Colombia’s superstar reggaetonero landed the cover of Elle’s February 2021 issue, becoming the first man to ever achieve the honor – and he shared a lot about his life – from his music, his 2020 experiences and his friendship with Jennifer Lopez.

And Maluma himself also seemed excited about the cover. “IT’S MALUMA BABY!!!!! Thank u @elleusa for making me the first male on the cover of the magazine, this means a lottttt to me!” he wrote on social media alongside the cover photo, which features the global superstar rocking green hair.  

“Let’s keep dreaming and achieving,” he added. 

Although the Colombian singer-songwriter’s world tour was suspended last year due to the coronavirus pandemic, Maluma’s popularity has continued to skyrocket. (He even dropped a collab with The Weeknd last fall.)

In the interview, he reflected on 2020 and how it’s impacted him and his career.

Credit: MICAIAH CARTER / Elle

“2020 has been a very difficult year for all of us, but I feel like this was my best year so far, musically, artistically, and personally,” Maluma told Elle, and he couldn’t be more right.

“I was talking the other day with my parents, and they were very happy because I’ve stayed a long time in Colombia, but they were also a little bit worried because they didn’t know what was going to happen with my work,” he continued, reflecting on the time he’s spent at home amid the pandemic. “My job is being on tour, but for me this has been very positive, being here in Colombia. I feel very connected again with myself.”

The singer also opened up about building connections with others, especially in the music industry.

“I don’t really like having new friends,” he said. “I try to make friends in the industry, but it is very hard. Sometimes I feel like they want to be my friends, but once I show them my back, they stab me.” 

“I prefer staying safe with my friends, where I always feel comfortable. When I didn’t have any money, they were there for me, inviting me to their house for lunch. They’re the ones who were laughing at me, and now they are enjoying my success,” he continued. “That’s life—just being grateful for everything that has happened.”

Though he didn’t name names, many were quick to speculate about who Maluma may be referring to.

While Maluma didn’t explicitly name anyone in the industry, Anuel AA appeared to diss him in Bryant Myers’ “Gang-Ga” remix in 2019. In the song, Anuel rapped, “Nunca flow Maluma / Siempre real G,” in which Anuel essentially meant he had a “real flow.”

The Puerto Rican artist added more fuel to the fire by writing on Instagram, “Flow Maluma = Pa las baby.” Around that time, Bad Bunny also tweeted Anuel’s verse.

Maluma later addressed the lyrics during an interview with Molusco, saying, “No me importa, la verdad. No me importa,” which translates to “I don’t care, in all honesty. I don’t care.” He joked for Anuel and Bad Bunny to call him, adding, “I don’t know why they did it. I’m still confused.”

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This Is How The Media Portrays Latino Men And Here’s What We Can Do About It

bad hombres

This Is How The Media Portrays Latino Men And Here’s What We Can Do About It

In a video that was featured on the Huffington Post, mitu’s very own Kat Lazo takes on the perception of Latino dudes as machista stereotypes in her series “The Kat Call.” She debunks the cultural stigma as well as sheds light on the origins of this problematic way of thinking.

The media falsely portrays Latino men as womanizing criminals…

Desperado / Sony Pictures

I love Danny Trejo as much as the next guy, but when you look at the majority of roles he’s cast in, they to fall under the category of “The Bandito” — a violent bad guy character.

Which results in real life consequences…

The Muppets / Disney

“These over the top sexual and aggressive messages of Latino men influence how teachers view Latino boys, how the police interact with Latino men or how employers view Latino applicants,” explains Lazo.

This negative perception informs public opinion and promotes harmful stereotypes…

Machete Kills / Open Road Films

Anybody consuming the media develops an outlook based on what they see, and as Kat explains “no one is free of internalizing these messages.”

But, “once you’re made aware of these messages, it makes it easier to break them down.”

The Real Daytime / YouTube

Look at people on an individual basis and don’t “group them together based on their cultural background.” According to Kat, the reason that Latino men are associated with chauvinism and machismo at all actually stems from the fact that “we live in a male-dominated society.”

Check out “The Kat Call” with Kat Lazo:

Are Latinos the only womanizers?

Posted by We are mitú on Sunday, March 26, 2017

[H/T] Latino Voices: Video Breaks Down Why Machismo Isn’t Synonymous With Latino Men

Read: The Kinds Of Dads You Meet While Dating

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