Entertainment

Fat Joe Explains Why You Don’t Squabble With Mike Tyson

Rapper Fat Joe recently paid a visit to “Highly Questionable,” the ESPN talk show hosted by Cuban-American sports writer Dan Le Batard. Fat Joe, who is a lot less fat these days, joined Le Batard and co-host Bomani Jones to talk about one of his biggest passions: basketball. After sharing stories about NYC street ball games featuring NBA stars, Joe shared a story involving the late Big Pun and boxing legend Mike Tyson.

“Isn’t there a memorable story involving you, Big Pun and Mike Tyson?” Dan Le Batard asked Fat Joe.

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CREDIT: @HQONESPN / TWITTER

After a show in Jersey, Fat Joe and Big Pun decided they wanted to keep the party going. They decided on The Tunnel because it had a reputation. “The Tunnel was like, people get shot, get stabbed every week. You gotta be out of your mind to go there.” And so they went, but they didn’t even make it inside the club before they found trouble.

Giant security guards demanded Big Pun to take his Timberland’s off so they could search them for weapons.

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CREDIT: @HQONESPN / TWITTER

Even though the bouncers were monsters, Big Pun refused to take off his boots. “Pun is like, ‘I’m Big Pun. I’m double platinum. I’m a superstar. I’m not taking off my boots.'” The bouncers didn’t like what they heard and soon they were exchanging words.

Fat Joe stepped in with words of his own.

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CREDIT: @HQONESPN / TWITTER

Things got heated, and there were six gigantic bouncers looking to get into a squabble with Pun and Joe. The odds didn’t look good and Joe knew it. He told Pun, “Yo Pun, you’re my brother, we going to fight all of them, but we are going to get our asses kicked.” Still, Pun was ready to go to war, which meant Joe was going to have to have his back.

But as they approached the security guards, they heard a distinct, high-pitched voice yell out, “Hey Pun. Hey Joe. F— these dudes over here.”

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CREDIT: @HQONESPN / TWITTER

“This is like one of those Geico commercials, where you’re like ‘Mike Tyson.’ Like you know you can just dream up Mike Tyson.” Apparently Mike Tyson, just out of jail, already had a run in with the bouncers and was looking for revenge.  So it was Pun, Joe, and one of the baddest dudes on the planet ready to go against the bouncers. The bouncers were so intimidated by Tyson that by the end of it, the main bouncer who started the problems was begging for forgiveness.

Listen to the whole story straight from Fat Joe (begins at 2:10 mark).

CREDIT: HQONESPN / TWITTER

READ: Giovani Dos Santos Knows You Don’t Mess With Julio Cesar Chavez

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Cardi B, Anuel A, And Fat Joe Joined Forces To Deliver New Track With A Sample Of Salsa Classic ‘Aguanile’

Entertainment

Cardi B, Anuel A, And Fat Joe Joined Forces To Deliver New Track With A Sample Of Salsa Classic ‘Aguanile’

officialpsds.com / www.sccpre.cat

Last night, rapper Fat Joe dropped the new track “Yes” featuring fellow Bronx native Cardi B and Puerto Rican trap star Anuel AA. This is that Latinx heat we need to keep us warm this fall. This marks Cardi B’s third feature this summer following the hits “Wish Wish” with DJ Khaled and “Rodeo” with Lil Nas X. Anuel AA hasn’t been having a bad summer himself with “China” featuring Ozuna, Daddy Yankee, J Balvin and Karol G, dominating the global charts. 

Fat Joe just celebrated his 49th birthday and will be releasing his 12th album “Family Ties” which also marks a reunion with Grammy-winning producer Dre of Cool & Dre. 

I don’t know if you know this but the Bronx’s official national anthem is Terror Squad’s “Lean Back.” Fat Joe is royalty in the Bronx, so it was practically inevitable we would get a Cardi B collab from the legend. This is the essence of boogie down solidarity. It is one thing to be Latinx, it is another thing to be a Latinx from The Bronx — it just is. Yerrr. So while I am sure many people will enjoy this bop, I am far more certain I will hear it blasting outside my window from someone’s car speakers for the rest of my mortal life. 

“Yes” is a yes from me, dawg.

Fat Joe dropped “Yes” at midnight last night. Cardi B and Anuel AA each have a verse on the track which samples Willie Colón and Hector Lavoe’s salsa classic “Aguanilé.” According to Rolling Stone, the 1972 song was inspired by the Yoruba and Spanish word “Aguanilé” which is used in Santería to describe a “spiritual cleanse.” No wonder the sample hauntingly pulls you into the song’s pulsating trap beat.

Joe raps the not safe for work earworm of a hook “A** up, facedown.” Considering these artists’ background, the single is fittingly a new strip club anthem. Cardi B got her start as a stripper in New York City and will play one in the new movie Hustlers alongside Jennifer Lopez and LizzoMeanwhile, Fat Joe plays Winny Win Winford, a New York City strip club owner in Netflix’s She’s Gotta Have It. The artwork for the single features an ’80s style neon sign silhouette of a naked woman on a stripper pole. You know, because we Latinxs love good clean fun in The Bronx. 

La Cardi!

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The dog walker.

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“La Cardi” the rapper says as she jumps on the track, leaning into her Dominican inflection. The song falls into the classic rap paradigm of boastful, decadent, lyrics. Each lyricist takes their turn flexing on the track, and we don’t really need more introspection than that because this song is clearly intended to be a fun club banger. 

“Murder and the money on my mind. My palm and my trigger finger itch,” she spits. “I’ve been in my bag, hopping out of jets.” 

Cardi may even be confirming her Bronx gang affiliation with the lyrics, “Lookin’ for me? Hit my line 1-800-59, BX.” The lyrics seem to allude to 5-9 Brims, a blood gang in The Bronx, at least according to Genius.

A bilingual bop.

Anuel AA’s verse is entirely in Spanish. I love this trend where Latinxs don’t try to assimilate and speak their native tongue. There is something to be said about Justin Bieber having to speak Spanish to get featured on Luis Fonsi’s “Despacito” rather than the other way around. In “Yes,” Anuel boasts about making $15 million a record amidst putting the usual haters in their place.  

Puffy approved. 

“This one is special, you know what I’m sayin? Puff Daddy told me and Cool way back in the day that every hit record has a story,” “Yes” producer Dre said in a series of Instagram stories. “And geeze … let’s just put it this way: This one was months in the making, but it was worth the wait … I think y’all really gonna fuck with it.”

Latinx power.

The Latinx chart domination shall continue henceforth. The Bronx’s come up shall continue ad infinitum as well. 

“When I came out, I knew I wasn’t the best rapper on earth. But I knew there was a bunch of Latinos that felt like me across the country and across the world, who really related to what I was rapping about, and that they would really appreciate it. Same thing when I discovered Big Pun,” Fat Joe told Remezcla of Latinx representation in hip hop. 

It is always great to see Latinx artists not just collaborating together but bringing also sampling throwback Latinx music to introduce it to new generations.

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Big Pun’s Son Responds To Media’s ‘Misinterpretation’ That His Song Is About Dad’s Domestic Abuse

Culture

Big Pun’s Son Responds To Media’s ‘Misinterpretation’ That His Song Is About Dad’s Domestic Abuse

Rapper Chris Rivers released this song that has some rap fans upset.

The song “Fear of My Crown” is a new song by Chris Rivers, the son of one of hip hop’s greatest lyricists of all time, Big Pun. The music video for the song features several instances of abuse. One that stands out is an abusive father performing some heinous acts of domestic violence against his wife and son. The video culminates with the boy fighting back.

Many have speculated that the song and video were specifically about Chris Rivers’ relationship with his father.

Big Pun is often listed in many “top five rappers of all time” lists. The Puerto Rican rapper from the Bronx was larger than life in more ways than one. Lyrically he was a monster. And he was also, and this is not a scientific term, huge. The man wasn’t called Big Pun for nothing. At the end of his life he weighed close to 700 lbs. He tragically rapped “I just lost a hundred pounds, I ain’t going nowhere” in the song “It’s So Hard,” which released two months after his passing.

Big Pun left behind a legacy of dope songs, many of which featured him talking tough about kicking ass and shooting guns. Standard stuff for the late 90’s. But rumors did circulate about his alleged domestic abuse issues after his passing, with many fans rejecting the idea or saying it was either too soon or wrong to speak ill of the dead. His wife Liza Rios begged to differ.

In an E! interview, Big Pun’s wife spoke candidly about his abuse and even had footage of him hitting her with a gun.

She proceed to pull a shotgun on him. This probably wasn’t the first or last time the violence occurred. It obviously influenced Chris Rivers’ growing up in the household.

Although Pun and his wife had this history, Chris Rivers took to Facebook to address speculation by fans and the frustration the video caused many of them.

The intentions of the video was to raise the general awareness of domestic violence and nothing more . The story in the video was no way a depiction of my story or my father in any way , but the basic cycle of abuse. This was meant to be an empowering video for people who has been through this and a voice for kids and the people who has suffered and on that note it’s been very helpful to thousands of people who has been touched by it. Even the people hitting me personally thanking me for speaking up and giving them the courage to face their own past and grow from it. Unfortunately the media spun it and has been targeting and demonizing my pops off of it. Their misinterpretation of the entire premise is drastic and I️ hate to see my father who was a great man who did many great things, not only for hip hop but for his community and loved ones , be marginalized into a bad person because people wanna focus on one thing. I️ as his son have long forgiven any and all things from my childhood and see him as a great man. My family also. And if we can see that then others should as well. He was abused as a child and went through so much as well as had many demons which he struggled with in his life that he needed help for. It’s hard to not idolize someone so great but he was a human at the end of the day and did his best to overcome his tribulations. If you isolate one section of anyone, you can Paint a picture of a villain but viewing the man as a whole , he has his flaws as well as his incredible nature and I’m nothing but proud of him and love him dearly. It’s important to break the cycle and to not be ignorant about all parties involved and reach to a solution opposed to playing the blame game . I️ want this video to empower and bring awareness. To bring voice to the silenced and bring courage to the oppressed. I️ love each of you. I️ just want you to love yourselves. #DragonGod #DragonsUp #IFeelAwesome #YouShouldToo #SpicJames #SexSymbol #AlmostCool #LoveIsLove

Posted by Chris Rivers on Thursday, November 9, 2017

In his Facebook post he made sure to say to write that yes, bad things happened, but that’s not what the song and video were about. He wrote that the song’s intention “was to raise the general awareness of domestic violence and nothing more.” He further went on to explain:

“Unfortunately the media spun it and has been targeting and demonizing my pops off of it. Their misinterpretation of the entire premise is drastic and I️ hate to see my father who was a great man who did many great things, not only for hip hop but for his community and loved ones, be marginalized into a bad person because people wanna focus on one thing. I️ as his son have long forgiven any and all things from my childhood and see him as a great man. My family also. And if we can see that then others should as well. He was abused as a child and went through so much as well as had many demons which he struggled with in his life that he needed help for.”

The song is part of his upcoming album “Deloreon.”

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