Entertainment

9 Ridiculously Expensive “Mexican” Items

Don’t you love it when common Mexican items are “reinterpreted” and turned into luxury items? Who wouldn’t want to pay a grand for a piñata bag or nearly $10,000 for a Mariachi jacket? These “Mexican” items have price tags that would definitely make your parents say “¿Cuanto? ¡Están locos!”

1. “Piñata Crossbody Bag” by Charlotte Olympia – $1,295

Expensive Mexican Items

2. “Huarache Flats” by Tory Burch – $295

Expensive Mexican Items

3. “Mexican Bracelet” by Deszo – $330

Expensive Mexican Items

4. “Guarachero Boots” by Comme Des Garçons – $515

Expensive Mexican Items

5. “Mexican Jacket” by Valentino – $8,990

Expensive Mexican Items

6. “Mexico City Dress” by Casper and Pearl — $139 (On Sale for $91)

Expensive Mexican Items

7. “Rose Embroidered Fringe Poncho” by Dolce and Gabbana – $1,495

Expensive Mexican Items

8. “Mexican Embroidered Leather Sandals” by Nicholas Kirkwood – $480 (On Sale for $287)

Expensive Mexican Items

9. “Skull Charm Sandals” by Charlotte Olympia – $1,140

Expensive Mexican Items

Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Things That Matter

Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Yasin Yagci / Getty Images

Mexico is celebrating four compassionate children who have each been nominated for a prestigious international award, for their dedication to solving issues within their own communities.

Three kids from Oaxaca and one from Sinaloa have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award – which is award to children from around the world who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

Each of Mexico’s four nominees have done so much for their communities – and the world at large – that it’s going to be a close contest to decide who is the ultimate winner.

Four kids from Mexico are in the running for a prestigious international peace award.

Among 138 children from 42 countries, four Mexican kids have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award, which is awarded to minors who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

The award comes with a €100,000 (about $117,000 USD) prize which can be used to invest in the solutions they’ve been championing. In fact, one of last year’s winners was climate change activist Greta Thunberg and peace advocate Divina Maloum from Cameroon.

On this occasion, Mexico’s nominees are counting on the win and include three nominees from Oaxaca and one from the state of Sinaloa.

Each of the children nominated have done incredible work to help solve issues in their communities.

In order to be nominated for the award and to be considered for the top prize, children must demonstrate their commitment to making a “special effort to promote children’s rights and better the situation of vulnerable children,” according to the Children’s Peace Prize website.

It goes without saying that each of Mexico’s four nominees have already checked off each of those requirements, with each of them making major advancements in issues that affect their communities, their country, and children from around the world.

In fact, the issues this group of children have been taking on range from combatting bullying and domestic violence, to increasing access to education, protecting young women and girls from endemic violence, and combatting the global Covid-19 pandemic.

One nominee from Oaxaca founded her own foundation to help advance the issues she cares about.

In an interview with Milenio, Georgina Martínez, 17, said that the award represents a great opportunity.

“This year we are among the 142 nominees from 42 different countries and I believe that without a doubt there is a commitment from all of us as Mexican children and young people to win it to continue fighting for our dreams,” she said.

Martínez, who won the national youth award in 2017, has been working for the rights of children and young people for 10 years through various campaigns, such as “Boys and Girls to the Rescue”, which focused on helping vulnerable minors combat bullying and domestic violence. She also supported the Nutrikids campaign that fed minors in precarious situations, worked to build classrooms in impoverished communities, and has also been a speaker at various conferences.

“My activism began when I was 9 years old, when I participated in the ninth parliament of the girls and boys of Mexico, where I was a children’s legislator. We spent a week at the Chamber of Deputies to work in favor of children’s rights. There I realized that my voice could be heard and that I could be the voice of many children who perhaps did not have access to many of their rights such as education and health,” she told Milenio.

Young Georgina Martínez is in her last year of high school, and she has in mind to continue working in the present and the future to continue being a person and agent of change.

Martínez’s brother is also in the running for his work against the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jorge Martínez, the 13-year-old brother of Georgina, considers it a great honor to represent Oaxaca in the contest.

“I was nominated for my masks project, which consists of using 3D printing to print universal headbands and make acrylic masks, which I donate to hospitals,” he told Milenio.

“I started by making 100 masks, which I financed with my savings, and donated them to the children’s hospital to help hospitalized children so that they wouldn’t be infected with Covid-19. The project went viral allowing me to grow the project and it soon gained international attention,” he added.

Many of his neighbors and friends consider him to be an actual genius but he’s far too modest to take on that title. He said that “the truth is, all this technology is something that I like a lot and it’s fun to be able to work in fields that you enjoy.”

Martínez also shared his plans for the future, telling Milenio that he’d love to move to China to be able to work in robotics and engineering.

Oaxaca also has a third nominee in the global contest.

Oaxaca’s third nominee for the prize is a young ballet dancer, activist, and storyteller – Aleida Ruiz Sosa – who is a defender of women’s rights. She’s currently studying online as she finishes high school and plans to pursue a law degree, in addition to advancing her dance career.

She’s been a longstanding voice for women.

“Since I was very young I have worked hard to help my community. I have a collection of stories called “Rainbow”, that speaks out about violence against women. In fact, I worked with the Attorney General of Oaxaca, and the main thing is that all the proceeds from the sale of these stories will go to the young victims of femicide,” she told Milenio.

Also nominated is 16-year-old Enrique Ángel Figueroa Salazar of Mazatlán, who is passionate about children’s rights and wishes to change local, federal and global societies so that children can live a life free of violence.

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Nordstrom Has A New ‘Inclusive Beauty’ Category To Highlight Black-Owned Beauty Brands And It’s Where The Money Is At

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Nordstrom Has A New ‘Inclusive Beauty’ Category To Highlight Black-Owned Beauty Brands And It’s Where The Money Is At

Gallo Images / Contributor

If you’re looking to be more intentional about where you spend your cash, Nordstrom has just made your efforts to support Black-owned businesses easier.

The department store recently launched a new Inclusive Beauty online shopping category to highlight Black businesses. In a post to the site’s Inclusive Beauty landing page, Nordstrom encouraged users to “Check out these need-to-know Black-founded beauty brands that we’re proud to have in the Nordstrom family.” The new category includes beloved lines like  Brioge, Epara and Beauty Bakerie!

Even better, the Inclusive Beauty section features a wide range of makeup shades to suit all complexions as well as hair products like silk pillowcases, and hairpieces.

Check out some of the featured Black-owned Beauty brands below!

Bomba Curls Dominican Forbidden Hair Mask

$28NordstromSHOP NOW

Briogeo Repair Rituals Hair Care Set

Briogeo

$20NordstromSHOP NOW

Baby Tress 3-in-1 Edge Styler™ Tool Blush

Baby Tress

$15NordstromSHOP NOW

Epara Hydrating Mist

$56NordstromSHOP NOW

Beauty Bakerie Black Blending Egg Makeup Sponge Set

Beauty Bakerie

$18NordstromSHOP NOW

BeautyStat Universal C Eye Perfector Cream

$65NordstromSHOP NOW

Mantl Face + Scalp Invisible Daily SPF 30 Broad Spectrum

Mantil

$27NordstromSHOP NOW

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