Things That Matter

Endangered Baby Dolphin Dies Because Tourists Wanted To Take Selfies With It…Seriously

In this month’s WTF news, two endangered dolphins were PULLED out of the ocean by tourists at Santa Teresita beach in Buenos Aires, Argentina. One of the dolphins tragically died after a mob of people passed the poor little thing around for selfies… SELFIES! Chalk this up to one of the unforeseen perils of technology and social media.

It all started when a baby Franciscana dolphin came very close to shore near a beach resort in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

CloseToShore
Credit: Live Leak / World News / YouTube

Usually people are quick to get the dolphin back to open water — you know, to save its life — but these people had a different plan.

PulledFromTheWater
Credit: Live Leak / World News / YouTube

Bystanders picked it up from the water, brought it to shore and set it on the ground.

FishOutOfWater
Credit: Live Leak / World News / YouTube

Why would you even take the dolphin out of the water?

READ: Vultures in Peru are Warning Residents of the Impact of Their Garbage

Then all hell broke loose as beachgoers crammed around the dolphin for selfies.

After they got their fill of photographs with the baby dolphin, it was abandoned on the beach and left to die.

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Credit: @NigelBirtto / Twitter

“This terribly unfortunate event is an example of the casual cruelty people can inflict when they use animals for entertainment purposes, without thinking of the animal’s needs,” a spokeswoman for Australia’s World Animal Protection branch told ABC Australia. “At least one of these dolphins suffered a horrific, traumatic and utterly unnecessary death, for the sake of a few photographs.”

READ: Monkeys In Nicaragua Are Dropping Dead And People Have NO Idea Why

People quickly took to Twitter to announce their outrage and condemn the people responsible for the dolphin’s death, kind of like this:

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Credit: Futurama / FOX / London Grumblr

People lost faith in humanity after reading the news.

While others just attribute the sad scene to the evolution of the human psyche.

https://twitter.com/ColTalbot1/status/700310523125108736

Some people just want to join a different species after seeing the harm caused by those humans.

And others seem to be losing hope in society all together.

Watch them pull the baby dolphin out of the water below… if you want to:

Credit: Live Leak / World News / YouTube

What do you think about the tragic and horrific death of the baby dolphin? Share this story with your friends and share the problems and concerns of social media!

Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

Entertainment

Sephora Announced It’s Finally Taking Mink False Eyelashes Off Of Its Shelves

Mat Szwajkos / Getty

When it comes to buying products we all have a responsibility to know where our dollars go.

And while in the world of beauty it might seem a bit tricky to be conscientious of animal rights and our planet… it’s so essential. Fortunately, Sephora agrees and their latest announcement confirms it!

Recently, Sephora announced that it would no longer sell mink-based lashes online or in-store in an effort to combat animal cruelty.

Speaking to Allure this week, the big-box beauty store announced that they had started 2020 with efforts to phase mink lashes out of its stock. This week, after animal rights activist organization PETA launched a campaign demanding that the brand do so, the retailer confirmed that when it comes to false eyelashes they are going completely mink-free.

“Following a PETA campaign and emails from more than 280,000 concerned shoppers, Sephora has confirmed that it has banned mink-fur eyelashes and will purchase only synthetic or faux-fur lashes going forward,” PETA shared in a statement about the decision.

In a graphic video about the trading and selling of mink fur which is often used for coats and fake eyelashes, the organization urged Sephora to stop selling the beauty product.

*Warning this video is graphic*

The organization lambasted fur farms in its statement saying “As PETA pointed out in its letters to Sephora, mink fur typically comes from fur farms, where stressed minks frantically pace and circle endlessly inside cramped wire cages and many languish from infections or broken or malformed limbs. Some minks even self-mutilate as a result of the intensive confinement, chewing into their own limbs or tails. At the end of their miserable lives, they’re gassed or electrocuted or their necks are broken.”

Confirming their decision to take mink off of its shelves, Sephora wrote in a statement that they “have always been committed to upholding the highest standards of beauty, and we take our responsibility to communicate transparently and honestly with our clients about the products we carry seriously.”

The brand went on to say that they shared with PETA “earlier this year we had already decided to begin phasing mink products out of our assortment in 2020. We have only ever offered products our clients can trust and we stand by the people and partners who have made the Sephora experience what it is today.”

After COVID-19 Shut Down Flights, A Man Sailed Across The Atlantic Ocean All So That He Could See His Dad

Things That Matter

After COVID-19 Shut Down Flights, A Man Sailed Across The Atlantic Ocean All So That He Could See His Dad

Getty Images Sport

For one Argentian man, there really ain’t no mountain high enough.

After the coronavirus pandemic halted international travel, Juan Manuel Ballestero set sail on a three-month-long high seas journey to his see his 90-year-old father, proving not even a novel virus could keep him from his dad.

Ballestero set out to see his father after his home country of Argentina canceled all international passenger flights in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

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Misión cumplida! La fe cruza oceanos

A post shared by Juan Manuel Ballestero (@skuanavega) on

According to The New York Times, Ballestero had been on the Portugal island of Porto Santo when Argentina canceled international passenger flights. Still determined to see his father, Ballestero decided to set out on an 85-day sailing voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. All on his own.

“I didn’t want to stay like a coward on an island where there were no cases,” Juan Manuel said in an interview with The New York Times. “I wanted to do everything possible to return home. The most important thing for me was to be with my family.”

Ballestero is a veteran sailor and fisherman who has been a lover of water since he was 3 years old.

Still his family expressed that they were nervous about his decision to go his journey alone.

“The uncertainty of not knowing where he was for 50-some days was very rough, but we had no doubt this was going to turn out well,” his father, Carlos Alberto Ballestero said in an interview with The New York Times.

He also documented the trip all while on Instagram.

Though Ballestero made the trip home safe and sound, he did run into a few issues along the way.

Ballestero said that on April 12 authorities in Cape Verde barred him from docking his sailboat so that he could replenish his food supply and refuel his boat. At the time, Ballestero was eating only canned tuna, fruit, and rice. Because of Cape Verde’s denial, he was forced to continue forward with less fuel and rely on winds. What’s more, towards the end of his trip, Ballestero hit choppy waters and was forced to add an additional 10 days to his trip while in Vitória, Brazil.

Despite the complications, Ballestero said he never considered giving up. “I wasn’t afraid, but I did have a lot of uncertainty,” he explained. “It was very strange to sail in the middle of a pandemic with humanity teetering around me… There was no going back.”

Ballestero arrived on June 17 in Mar del Plata.

“Entering my port where my father had his sailboat, where he taught me so many things and where I learned how to sail and where all this originated, gave me the taste of a mission accomplished,” he shared before revealing that he had to take a test for COVID-19 before he could see his family. Fortunately, after 72 hours of waiting for his results, he found out that he was COVID-19-free and able to enter Argentina.

Despite his long trip, Ballestero said that he’s eager to hit the waters again soon.

“What I lived is a dream. But I have a strong desire to keep on sailing.”