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Latinos Are Clapping Back At Donald Trump At the Polls

Despite what the haters have been saying, Latinos are showing up for this election like never before, according to early voting numbers.

This election cycle  has left most Americans feeling like this:

Ugly Betty / Hulu / GIPHY

We are all a nervous mess, people are losing sleep, and friendships are ending because of this.

But Latinos are really flexing their political muscles all of a sudden.

Yosub Kim, Content Strategy Director / GIPHY

Yes, really. Reports of early voting in several states across the country are showing that Latinos are going to the polls in record numbers.

Just look at what happened this weekend in Nevada!


According to KTNV, the number of early voters on Friday (Nov. 4) set a record for the most early voters in a single day for Clark County, Nevada. More than 57,000 people turned up to vote in the county.

The Cardenas supermarket in Las Vegas was the most visible example of the power of the Latino vote.

“So Cardenas was responsible for adding 1,000 to the Democratic lead,” political commentator Jon Ralston wrote in an opinions piece. “Trump has almost no path to the presidency without Nevada.”


This one tweet perfectly sums up how many Latinos feel about the voting turnout in Nevada.


Got ’em!

But Nevada is not the only state that has seen surges in Latino voters. Overall, 5 states are reporting larger than average Latino early voting numbers.

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¡Dale!

Arizona is leading the nation in increased Latino voters, according to AZ Central.


The AZ Central has reported that only 6.2 percent of Latinos early voted in 2012. As of Nov. 1, 12 percent of Latinos have voted early.

Florida is reporting a 100 percent increase in Latinos early voting.

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You read that right. There has been a 100 percent increase in Latinos going to the polls just in early voting. According to ABC News, 11 percent of early voting ballots in 2012 were cast by Latinos. So far, 14 percent of all early voting ballots have been caste by Latinos.

Overall, reports and predictions are expecting anywhere between 2 and 3 million more Latino voters for this election, which would indicate an increase from 11.2 million in 2012 to 13.1-14.7 million this year.

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“I think the way we’re looking at it, is that we’re gonna come out of this election having shown the growing power of Latino voters and for Latino voters [immigration reform] is a defining and mobilizing issue,” Frank Sharry, the director of America’s Voice, told Talking Points Memo. They are gonna want action.”

That’s what’s up. Let’s show these politicians that we Latinos are ready to make our voices heard.

Panic! At The Disco / GIPHY

READ: Before The Election, Let’s Correct Some Lies About Undocumented Immigrants

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Three Years After Traumatic Deportation, Alejandra Juarez Will Be Reunited With Her Family

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Three Years After Traumatic Deportation, Alejandra Juarez Will Be Reunited With Her Family

Scenes of her traumatic deportation made headlines around the world as she was forced to say goodbye to her husband (a U.S. veteran) and children back in 2018. Now, Alejandra Juarez is headed back to the United States just in time to celebrate Mother’s Day with her family.

Alejandra Juarez is back with her family three years after her very public and traumatic deportation to Mexico.

The wife of a U.S. Marine veteran, Alejandra Juarez’s deportation to Mexico made international headlines as she was forced to say goodbye to her husband and daughters at Orlando International Airport back in 2018. Many Americans found her story to be so powerful since she was married to a retired U.S. Marine, Cuauthemoc ‘Temo’ Juarez and each of her children are U.S. citizens. Not to mention Juarez had been living in the United States since she was 18 years old.

Since her deportation in 2018, Juarez has been living in Mexico but will be allowed to return to Florida – where her family is located – within the next couple of days. Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security granted Juarez humanitarian parole

Juarez is the wife of a U.S. Marine veteran whose traumatic deportation scene at Orlando International Airport in 2018 made headlines worldwide. On Monday, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security granted her a temporary reprieve known as humanitarian parole. Humanitarian parole allows entry to the country “due to an emergency” for someone who is otherwise not allowed to be in the country.

“This is the moment I’ve been waiting for,” Juarez told the Orlando Sentinel in an exclusive interview. “Once inside, I’m going to keep fighting and hopefully there’s a way I can find a permanent solution, but this is great!”

The emergency order allows Juarez to remain in the country until she finds a solution.

Florida Rep. Darren Soto (D) has been an advocate on behalf of the Juarez family and even joined Alejandra during her tearful goodbye to her family at the Orlando Airport.

According to report by the Orlando Sun-Sentinel, Soto said that his staff had sent a letter to his contacts at the White House, the Department of Homeland Security, and ICE officials, hoping they would reopen her case.

Around the same time, President Biden entered office and overturned the Trump administration’s ‘zero tolerance’ policy which had led to Alejandra’s deportation order. It’s also worth mentioning that Alejandra’s husband had voted for Donald Trump during the 2016 election without ever thinking that his wife could be targeted for deportation.

Congressman Soto has been a fighter for Alejandra while she’s been more than 700 miles away in Mexico and is proud to see justice for the Juarez family.

“When President Biden was elected, we knew there was a new hope of bringing her back,” he told the Orlando Sentinel. “But it was Alejandra overall, who showed the tenacity and determination to stop at nothing to get back to her family.”

Juarez’s story further captured our hearts and minds as part of a Netflix series.

Despite being hundreds of miles apart, the Juarez family has not remained silent. In fact, Alejandra’s story was told as part of the Netflix documentary series Living Undocumented. Juarez, along with seven other immigrants, clips of interviews with Juarez and Estela, 10, who talks about President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy on deporting those in the country without permission.

“He was going to deport criminals, but my mom is not a criminal,” Estela says. “She’s a military wife.”

And daughter Estela even took her mother’s case to the presidential campaign, when she read a powerful letter to then-President Donald Trump detailing her mother’s case and the agony her family has suffered. Thankfully, now, the family will soon be reunited just in time to celebrate Mother’s Day together.

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At Least 17 Dead And Hundreds Injured Following Massive Protests Across Colombia

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At Least 17 Dead And Hundreds Injured Following Massive Protests Across Colombia

A massive protest movement that swept across Colombia seems to have paid off – at least in the short term – as President Ivan Duque says that he will withdrawal the controversial tax plan that sent angry protesters into the streets. However, the protests claimed at least 17 victims who died during the unrest and hundreds more were injured.

Now that the president has withdrawn the controverial bill, many are wondering what’s next and will they have to take to the streets once again.

Massive protests claimed the lives of at least 17 people and hundreds more were injured across Colombia.

Unions and other groups kicked off marches on Wednesday to demand the government of President Ivan Duque withdraw a controversial tax plan that they say unfairly targets the most vulnerable Colombians.

Isolated vandalism, clashes between police and protesters and road blockades occurred in several cities on Saturday, and riot police were deployed in the capital.

Rights organization Human Rights Watch said it had received reports of possible police abuse in Cali, and local human rights groups alleged up to 17 deaths occurred.

After a week of protests, the government has shelved the controversial plan.

Faced with the unrest, the government of President Ivan Duque on Sunday ordered the proposal be withdrawn from Congress where it was being debated. In a televised statement, he said his government would work to produce new proposals and seek consensus with other parties and organizations.

President Duque, in his statement, acknowledged “it is a moment for the protection of the most vulnerable, an invitation to build and not to hate and destroy”.

“It is a moment for all of us to work together without paltriness,” he added. “A path of consensus, of clear perceptions. And it gives us the opportunity to say clearly that there will be no increase in VAT for goods and services.”

The tax reform had been heavily criticized for punishing the middle classes at a time of economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. The government introduced the bill on April 15 as a means of financing public spending. The aim was to generate $6.3 billion between 2022 and 2031 to reignite the fourth largest economy in Latin America.

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