Entertainment

Dude, So Many Latinos Are Going To Be Part Of The Academy, Finally!

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has spent the last two years fighting the assertion that it only cares about white people. Finally, this year, the Academy is taking steps to change the culture of the media company and awards ceremony by inducting the most diverse class in its history. Out of the 683 new Academy members, there are more than 50 Latinos and Latinas ready to make some change. ¡Orale! (or ¡Wepa!, whichever you prefer).

Earlier this year, the Oscars were once again called out for their lack of diversity.

Credit: @lupitanyongo / Instagram

Remember that #OscarsSoWhite hashtag that took over social media?

And the celebs took no time in tweeting, Instagramming and shouting their outrage. Gina Rodriguez weighed in:

Movement Monday's. This is Oscar Isaac. He is a Guatemalan American actor. This is a picture from Ex Machina directed by Alex Garland and was released this past year. With all this Oscar Talk and lack of diversity I decided to start a movement and speak from the perspective of a Latina American who desires to see more Latinos on screen. There are 55 million Latinos in this country and although we all come from various backgrounds our unity can make a movie explode at the box office or a tv show soar to the highest viewers possible. The better these projects do financially, the more money they will spend on putting Latinos In blockbuster films, as leads in tv shows Etc. My solution is this, support is needed. Right now there isn't one Latino that can Greenlight a movie. That means no studio will put their money behind a Latino face as a lead of a movie because they don't believe we can make their money back. I am told time and time again "Latinos dont watch Latino Movies. Latinos don't support each other" and sadly that is true. I'm not saying go and see a movie you don't like to blind support, im saying if you want to see us represented on film and tv, if you want to see Latinos nominated for Oscars, we NEED to support one another. The industry sees money, the excuse can't just be racism. We can make a difference in a very powerful way if we unite our support as one Latino community. Oscar Isaac, in my opinion had an Oscar worthy performance in this film. Let's start making noise with where it matters most, where we put our dollars. Go support these films, watch these shows (mine is on tonight by the way, shameless promotion feel free to watch on the CW) and we can take making a change into our own hands. Each Monday I will highlight a latino artist we can support. Let us use our numbers and powerful voices to prove we support one another, to prove we can make a box office hit, to prove they need to support all the various Latino cultures in the media. That can be one part of the solution, so next year we have many movies that are worthy of Oscar contention! #MovementMondays Pick any Latino currently working we can support!

A photo posted by Gina Rodriguez (@hereisgina) on

Credit: @hereisgina / Instagram

Rodriguez started #MovementMondays on social media to shine a light on Latinos who she felt weren’t being given their due. That was probably because most people in the Academy were white males, but who can really be sure?

So the Academy is doing something about it. It has invited 683 new members, which include lots of women and people of color. To be specific, 46 percent of the new members are female and 41 percent of the new members are people of color. ?

Credit: @TheAcademy / Twitter

Some of the invitees include America Ferrera.

Credit: @AmericaFerrera / Twitter

You might recognize her from a little Disney Original movie called “Gotta Kick It Up!” and her portrayal of Helen Chávez in the Cesar Chávez biopic.

Jorge R. Gutierrez, Animator/Director

Credit: @mexopolis / Twitter

“Book of Life.” ‘Nuff said.

Jacob Vargas, Actor

Credit: @TheJacobVargas / Twitter

Not only was he too in the Cesar Chávez biopic, but Vargas really honed it in for his role in “The 33.”

Luis Guzmán, Actor

Credit: @IamLuisGuzman / Twitter

Pretty sure this dude doesn’t need much of an introduction.

Daphne Zuniga, Actor

Credit: @DaphneZuniga / Twitter

She has been the driving force for shows like “Spaceballs” and “One Tree Hill.”

Michelle Rodriguez, Actor

Credit: @mrodofficial / Instagram

Good to know there is someone willing to vote just based on talent.

And here is a list of the rest:

Gabriel Gutiérrez, Sound

Fernando Velásquez, Composer

Raúl Antonio Dávalos, Editor

Walter Rippell, Casting Director

Carlos Reygadas, Writer

Enrique Castillo, Actor

Ignacio López Tarso, Actor

Silvia Pinal, Actor

Sal Lopez, Actor

Pepe Serna, Actor

Sara Bilbatua, Casting Director

Lucrecia Martel, Director

Carmen Cuba, Casting Director

Rodrigo Teixeira, Producer

Julie Carmen, Actor

Manuel Teil, Casting Director

Laura Amelia Guzmán, Director

Bárbara Alvarez, Cinematographer

Lula Carvalho, Cinematographer

Enrique Chediak, Cinematographer

Félix Monti, Cinematographer

Pilar Revuelta, Designer

Israel Cárdenas, Director

Juan Antonio Garcia Bayona, Director

Maria Novaro, Director

Affonso Gonçalves, Editor

Pedro Kos, Documentarian/Editor

Sebastián Lelio, Writer

Bernat Vilaplana, Editor

Patricia Riggen, Director

Beatrice De Alba, Make Up Artist

Sonia Grande, Costume Designer

Anna Muylaert, Director

Antonio Pinto, Composer

Belén Atienza, Producer

Fernando Bovaira, Producer

Esther García Rodríguez, Producer

Marisa Paredes, Actor

Renato Dos Anjos, Animator

Pato Escala, Animator

Luis Valdez, Director

Gabriel Osorio, Animator

Pablo Valle, Animator

Roberto Fernandez, Sound

Vera Blasi, Writer

Oscar Isaac, Actor

Eva Mendes, Actor

Jorge Perugorría, Actor

Cecilia Roth , Actor

Tessa Thompson, Actor

Israel Cárdenas, Director

Laura Amelia Guzmán, Director

Lucía Puenzo, Director


READ: Now’s a Good Time to Revisit the Time Chris Rock Said Mexicans Don’t Get Enough Love from Hollywood

Share this story with all your friends by tapping that share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latina Actresses Are Pivoting to Directing and Producing In Order to Get More Latinx Stories Told

Entertainment

Latina Actresses Are Pivoting to Directing and Producing In Order to Get More Latinx Stories Told

Credit: EVALONGORIA/AMERICAFERRERA/INSTAGRAM ; KEVIN WINTER/GETTY

The numbers are bleak. Latinos make up 18% of America’s population but only 5% of the number of speaking roles in movies in 2019 according to the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative.

Hollywood seems to be late to the party when it comes to Latino representation onscreen. But luckily, there are a handful of Latino artists and creators out there who are taking the fight to appear in front of the screen to behind the camera.

Take, for example, Eva Longoria, who was just announced to be directing and co-starring in the new action-comedy film, “Spa Day”

This marks the third movie the Mexican-American actress will be helming and the first Latina to ever direct more than one major studio film.

The other films on Longoria’s roster include a vehicle for her and Kerry Washington tentatively titled “24/7”, as well as the upcoming biopic “Flamin’ Hot”–a movie centered around Richard Montañez, the man who invented Flaming Hot Cheetos.

Longoria has been candid about how the decision to move into directing and producing has been a strategic one.

“One of the reasons I went into producing and directing was I wasn’t going to sit back and wait for somebody to create a role I wanted to do,” Longoria told Variety in 2018.

“You can’t just sit around waiting for [good projects], and I wanted to create that — not just for myself but for other Latinas.”

But her career transition isn’t unique as a Latina in Hollywood. She has joined the ranks of other Latinas in Hollywood who have began to produce and direct their own projects in order to finally see Latino stories told on screen.

Her peers include Jennifer Lopez (“Shades of Blue“, “Hustlers“), Selena Gomez (“Living Undocumented“), America Ferrera (“Gentefied“, “Superstore“), Gina Rodriguez (“Diary of an American President,” “Carmen San Diego“), and Salma Hayek (“Ugly Betty”).

All of these women have thrown their weight behind projects that otherwise wouldn’t be made if their names weren’t attached to them.

All of these women are creating stories that feature Latino stories and Latino talent–in front of and behind the camera.

America Ferrera explained the reason behind her conscious career pivot from acting to directing/producing: “My genuine heart’s desire is to tell stories that haven’t been told,” she told CBS This Morning. “It’s hard to get stories about people like us made. And then to get those stories told by us is very very uncommon.”

Although the endgame is to have Latinx stories greenlit without having to first be a famous singer or actress, the work these ladies are doing might be laying the foundation for an easier road for future industry players of Latino descent. Or as Longoria so eloquently put it: “If we unite and create opportunities for each other and pull each other up, there could be a lot more success for representation on TV.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

America Ferrera Recounts Her First Hollywood Audition Where She Was Asked to Sound “More Latina”

Entertainment

America Ferrera Recounts Her First Hollywood Audition Where She Was Asked to Sound “More Latina”

The 72nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, and big-name stars gathered to celebrate and acknowledge groundbreaking television programs. One of the celebrities that made a special appearance was America Ferrera.

In a segment called “This Is What I Sound Like,” Ferrera spoke about her troubling experiences as a young Latina actress just starting off in Hollywood.

Before the segment, “Grown-ish” actress Yara Shahidi introduced the segment, emphasizing the importance of representation onscreen.

“The stories we tell on TV shape how we see ourselves and others,” she said. “And how we are seen can many times determine how we are treated. The dream of television is the freedom to live our full and nuanced lives outside of boxes and assumptions.”

In a pre-recorded segment, Ferrera then described her first audition in Hollywood–an experience that ended up being a formative one.

“I was 16-years-old when I got my very first audition and I was this little brown chubby Valley Girl who spoke, you know, like a Valley Girl,” Ferrera explained. “I walked in, did my audition. The casting director looked at me and was like, ‘That’s great. Can you do that again, but this time, sound ‘more Latina?””

According to Ferrera, she asked the casting director whether she wanted her to do the audition in Spanish. The casting director declined. Ferrera tried to explain the contradiction of the directions, telling the casting director: “I am a Latina and this is what I sound like.” Needless to say, she did not get the part.

When she went home to tell her family the story, they seemed unsurprised by the blatant stereotyping Ferrera was facing. They told her that the entertainment industry will want her to “speak in broken English” and “sound like a chola”.

“What did you think was gonna happen?” her family members asked her. “[Hollywood was] gonna have you starring in the next role made for Julia Roberts?”

According to Ferrera, the realization that Hollywood saw her in a different way than she saw herself made her want to “create more opportunity for little brown girls to fulfill their talent and their dream.”

NEWMARKET FILMS

Since then, the Honduran-American actress has starred in numerous projects that illustrate the diversity of the Latinx experience in America, from “Real Women Have Curves” to “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” to “Ugly Betty“. Most recently, Ferrera dipped her toe into the producing waters with the bilingual Netflix series “Gentified“.

Although Ferrera is putting in the work for more Latinx representation onscreen, the Television Academy still has a long way to go when it comes to recognizing Latinx talent. Unfortunately, the only Latino person nominated for an Emmy this year was Argentine-Mexican actress Alexis Bledel for her work in “The Handmaid’s Tale”.

Here’s to hoping that Latinos like America Ferrera will continue to make their voices heard, giving inspiration to little brown girls everywhere who want nothing more than to see themselves onscreen.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com