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Cha Cha: How a Song about a Dominican Girl became the Jam of the Summer

Earlier this year, Virginia rapper D.R.A.M. released the track “Cha Cha.”

Credit: Complex / YouTube

?I like to Cha Cha… in a Latin bar… with a Dominican that resembles Taina.?

Catchy, right?

Even Beyoncé couldn’t resist the power of the “Cha Cha.”

This song makes me happy! ????????

A video posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

Why? Even if you “hate” the song, it’s instantly memorable for several reasons.

#1: It samples the music from Star Road in the video game Super Mario World.

Credit: Nintendo / VideoGameMusicPlace / YouTube

Infinite 1UPs for whoever thought to sample this.

#2: This line is virtually impossible to keep out of your head.

Soon enough, you’ll catch yourself singing it in the shower.

READ: Kap-G: Raza Rap from Atlanta

#3: It’s just plain FUN.

Credit: Does. Real. Ass. Music. / YouTube

Red solo cups + pillow fights = PARTY. What other music videos do you see old timers and kids dancing like there’s no tomorrow? Unfortunately, Nintendo caught wind of the Super Mario Bros. sample and the beat was changed. Not bad, but it’s lost a bit of the magic.

That hasn’t stopped people from making Vines inspired by the original:

Credit: KC Scannell / Vine

Credit: Hollywood Tzunami Editz #NWE / Vine

Credit: CJG / Vine

Or doing choreography to the song…

Credit: Jenna Gomez / YouTube

Or playing acoustic covers:

Credit: Tierra Wilson / YouTube

READ: Bye, Bye Bigotes: 11 Mexican Singers Without their Signature Mustaches

D.R.A.M. even got to meet one of his biggest fans:

It's lit forever, Queen?

A photo posted by B I G B A B Y (@only1dram) on

And if you haven’t noticed, it appears that D.R.A.M. loves Latino culture:

Cha Cha dancing ✔

A Latin bar ✔

Dominicans ✔

Taina ✔

Wait, who’s Taina?

Credit: Nickelodeon

D.R.A.M. was making a reference to Taina Morales, the lead character from the Nickelodeon show Taina that aired from 2001 to 2002. Taina was played by Puerto Rican actress Maria Perez-Brown.

Mexicans, don’t feel left out. Watch the music video. There are flying tacos and hot sauce…

Flying chiles…

Piñatas and sombreros…

And guacamole.

Hold up, though. Cha Cha dancing is Cuban. And what does Mexican food have to do with Dominicans?

Credit: Hot97 / YouTube

Apparently, D.R.A.M. wasn’t exactly well-versed in Latino culture when he wrote “Cha Cha.” But don’t worry, D.R.A.M. got a quick lesson during a visit to New York radio station Hot 97, where he learned that Dominicans dance to merengue and bachata.

After getting schooled, D.R.A.M. said he didn’t want to leave anyone out of the party: “It’s the whole Latin culture… I don’t want anyone that’s Puerto Rican to feel like, left out… or Cubanos, it’s the whole Latin culture.”

What do you think of the song “Cha Cha”? Do you feel like D.R.A.M is showing love to Latinos? Let us know in the comments below. 

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Legendary Astrologer Walter Mercado’s Home In Puerto Rico Is For Sale And At A Discount

Entertainment

Legendary Astrologer Walter Mercado’s Home In Puerto Rico Is For Sale And At A Discount

Prediction: You will want to check out Walter Mercado’s house in Puerto Rico, and maybe even buy it up and call it home. And what perfect timing, because the stars have aligned to bring you his Puerto Rico pad at an unbeatable price.

That’s right! Walter Mercado’s home in San Juan is up for sale!

Located in an “exclusive area” of San Juan, according to the property listing, the six-bedroom, five-bathroom estate is on sale for just $395,000.

Since you likely won’t fly to San Juan right now (thanks, COVID), you can check out the flamboyant cape aficionados sweet, two story tropical oasis on Realtor.com.

The listing photos show the home’s vibrant interior, which appears in the documentary, with yellow, red and green walls. The first floor boasts a large living room, kitchen and dining room. Tile-work leads up the stairs to the second level, where there’s yet another living room, dining room and a smaller kitchen — plus two balconies.

Outside, there’s a pool area with a gazebo and a patio, as well as a covered carport for at least four cars.

The home seems to be having trouble finding a buyer.

The estate originally hit the market for $495,000 in September 2020 but with no buyer in the cards, it then had its price slashed to $430,000 in December, according to Realtor.com. It’s now asking just $395,000.

Mercado already sold his Miami property in 2017 to cover financial difficulties.

While in Miami, Mercado maintained an apartment at The Grand in downtown for many years until 2017 when he decamped part time to New York.

Many in his family had hoped to turn his Puerto Rico home into a museum to the late icon, but due to zoning issues the family decided the best step forward was to list the home for sale. Regarding Mercado’s belongings that were contained within the home (so many of which we came to see in the Netflix documentary), one of his nieces told Pledge Times, that though family members have each kept some items, many were given to the Miami History Museum, and some items will go to Mexico. However, his cape with the Puerto Rican flag is being sent to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC.

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Voters In Puerto Rico Took To The Polls To Vote On Statehood And A New Governor

Things That Matter

Voters In Puerto Rico Took To The Polls To Vote On Statehood And A New Governor

Aas hundreds of millions of Americans took to the polls on Election Day to cast their ballots (in record-breaking numbers), voters were also showing up to the polls in Puerto Rico.

People across the island are now anxiously awaiting the results following a heated contest that saw long lines of voters and produced a tight gubernatorial race in the U.S. Caribbean territory.

It was the first election held since Hurricane Maria hit the island in 2017, causing damages estimated at more than $100 billion and killing an estimated 2,975 people. It’s also the first election since hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans took to the streets to demand the resignation of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló. The protests, now known as the “Summer of 2019,” were sparked by a leaked chat in which the then-governor and other officials made fun of hurricane victims, among other things, and made comments that led to an investigation into possible corruption.

The island’s top job is up for grabs for the first time since the last governor was forced to resign.

It’s been a rough couple of years for the island of Puerto Rico. Just last year, hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans took to the streets to demand the resignation of then Gov. Ricardo Rosselló. Now, for the first time since his resignation Puerto Ricans were able to choose their leadership.

Pedro Pierluisi of the pro-statehood New Progressive Party held a slight lead over Carlos Delgado of the Popular Democratic Party, which supports the island’s current status. More than 12,000 votes separated the top two candidates after counting more than 95% of the ballots cast Tuesday as well as some returns from early and absentee ballots, which were also still being tallied.

Pierluisi briefly served as governor following last year’s protests and previously represented Puerto Rico in Congress for eight years. He and Rosselló are from the same party.

Much like Trump, Pierluisi prematurely celebrated the results at a news conference, while Delgado said shortly after midnight that he would await final results.

“It’s irresponsible,” Delgado said of Pierluisi’s actions.

The island’s top two parties had a disappointing showing as voters look elsewhere for change.

Credit: Xavier Garcia / Getty Images

This year’s elections are also noteworthy because it’s the first time in recent history that neither of the island’s two main parties secured more than 40% of the overall vote. This is largely seen as a result of new, younger parties and candidates eroding the grip that both parties have long had on the island.

Many voters leaving the polls said that they voted for a new party because he said the New Progressives and Popular Democrats don’t deliver.

“It’s one promise after another and they don’t do anything,” one voter told Business Insider.

The island is also facing a dwindling voter base as hundreds of thousands of residents have left the island for states like Florida and New York. In this year’s election, there were 2.36 million eligible voters, compared with 2.87 million in 2016 and 2.4 million in 2012.

Despite the drop in eligible voters, the diversity of parties and candidates has increased in recent years, slowly eroding the grip that the New Progressives and Popular Democrats have had on the island’s politics for decades.

Rafael Fonseca, an administrator, told Bloomberg News he had hoped neither of the two parties would win this year.

“They’ve been doing the same thing for years and there’s no change,” he said, adding that the island’s public education system needs to be improved and wages increased to prevent the loss of young people moving to the U.S. mainland in search of work.

Voters have also appeared to support a non-binding resolution on Puerto Rican statehood.

In January, as part of Senate Bill 1467, the Puerto Rico Legislative Assembly added a referendum on statehood to the ballot. If it’s approved, the governor of Puerto Rico will appoint a seven-person commission to represent the island in statehood negotiations. If the governor then accepted the plan, it would be presented to the U.S. Congress and the president.

Full statehood for Puerto Rico would allow its residents constitutional rights that Puerto Ricans do not have: the ability to vote in presidential and congressional elections.

The non-binding referendum asked residents, “Should Puerto Rico be admitted immediately into the union as a state?”

Support for U.S. statehood was leading with more than 52%, with more than 95% of votes counted. However, U.S. Congress would have to approve of any changes to the island’s political status.

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