Entertainment

Don’t Judge ‘Em, These Actors Had To Start Somewhere

You never know where someone will end up. NEVER! If you need proof, take a look at the early roles these Latino actors, and tell us if you could have predicted where they’d end up.


Rosario Dawson – Ruby in “Kids”

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Credit: Miramax and Netflix

Most recently, Dawson has absolutely killed it in Netflix’s “Daredevil” (and “Jessica Jones”), where she plays Claire, a nurse who regularly helps mend Daredevil’s wounds. Have you seen Dawson’s first role, though? Dawson played a promiscuous teenager named Ruby in the controversial film “Kids,” which was all about teenagers, sex and drugs. Dawson got the part when she was only 15 years old after director Larry Clark spotted her hanging out with friends outside the building where she lived. Dawson told the New York Times she was nothing like her character: “I was a tutor. I was a virgin. I was boyfriend-less. I didn’t have sex until I was 20.”


Selena Gomez – Gianna on “Barney And Friends”

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Credit: Disney / @selenagomez / Instagram

Sure, we all know Gomez for being a pop star — and her unfortunate romantic run-ins and rerun-ins with the Biebs —  but the 23-year-old has been around FOREVER. Most people probably remember her early days in Disney’s “Wizards of Waverly Place,” but can we meditate for a minute on Gomez as Gianna in “Barney in Friends”? So freakin’ adorbs, we can’t EVEN!


Diego Luna – Quique Dominguez in “El Premio Mayor”

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Credit: Televisa and Disney / Lucasfilm

Right now, we’re pretty excited because Luna is going to go all sci-fi biggie on us, as he was cast in “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.” But we haven’t forgotten those squishy-cheeks he had as Quique Dominguez in the novela “El Premio Mayor.”


Jennifer Lopez – FlyGirl in “In Living Color”

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Credit: Fox and Jennifer Lopez / Instagram

Before “Selena,” before “Jenny from the Block,” before anyone really knew who she was, Lopez was a Fly Girl, a.k.a. a dance troupe member in the ’90s comedy series “In Living Color.” Truth be told, she’s been fly ever since.


Oscar Isaac – Frank in “All About The Benjamins”

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Credit: New Line Cinema and Disney / Lucasfilm

Poe Dameron from the “Star Wars” franchise may go down in history as one of Isaac’s most renowned roles. Let’s NOT forget that once upon a time — 2002 to be exact — Isaac appeared in the movie “All About The Benjamins,” where he played a character named Fran-fucken-cesco. OK, his name was actually Frankie.


George Lopez – Eddie Martinez in “Ski Patrol”

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Credit: Triumph Films and TV Land

Lopez does such a good job of playing himself on TV or doing stand-up comedy that it would be incredibly easy to forget that in 1990 he played the part of wacky ski patrolman Eddie Martinez in “Ski Patrol.” His over-the-top impersonation of Rodney Dangerfield makes us kind of wish we could forget the whole thing.


Zoe Saldana – Eva Rodriguez in “Center Stage”

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Credit: Columbia Pictures and “Colombiana” / TriStar Pictures

Back in 2000, Saldana played Eva Rodriguez in “Center Stagem,” and it was EVERYTHING. She got to show off her dancing skills — she trained to be a ballerina before becoming an actress — and wasn’t all unrecognizably alien-y blue with freaky ears like she was in “Avatar.” When Elle magazine once told Saldana they still love “Center Stage,” Saldana replied: “Everyone’s afraid to tell me that because they’re afraid they’ll seem weird, but oh my gosh, I love hearing that! It’s still one of my favorite movies, too.”


Sofia Vergara – Diet Pepsi Commercial

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Credit: Pepsi / ABC

Check this out! Vergara was only 17 years old when she was in a Pepsi commercial back in her native Colombia. Now in her 40s, and after starring in “Modern Family” as Gloria, she is a spokesperson for Diet Pepsi. How much you wanna bet she’s getting paid WAY more now?


Danny Trejo – Frank a.k.a Casual Dreamer in “Mi Vida Loca”

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Credit: Sony Pictures Classics and Troublemaker Films

Everybody recognizes Trejo as el mero mero from “Machete.” Before he became an icon, he was an ex-con-turned-counselor trying to help people overcome drug and alcohol addictions. One day in the mid ’80s, he went to the set of “Runaway Train” to help someone he was counseling and ended up getting cast in the movie. Soon, he was appearing in movies like “Mi Vida Loca” and “Heat.” He’s been killing it in Hollywood ever since.


Lin-Manuel Miranda – Mario in “The Electric Company”

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Credit: PBS Kids and Neilson Barnard / Getty

The guy who created and stars in “Hamilton” on Broadway — also one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2016 — used to rap about the alphabet on the PBS show “The Electric Company.” Wrap your brain around that!


Salma Hayek – Teresa Chavero Martinez in “Teresa”

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Credit: Televisa and Ugly Betty / ABC

Frida and Salma go together like Teresa and Salma. American audiences may think of Hayek as the monobrowed heroine in the biopic “Frida,” pero those of use who grew up watching telenovelas KNOW that Hayek made her debut in 1989 as the star of the Televisa novela “Teresa” rockin’ her curls!


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Netflix Is Bringing Latinidad To The Fantasy Realm And LOTR Fans Gear Up

Entertainment

Netflix Is Bringing Latinidad To The Fantasy Realm And LOTR Fans Gear Up

Streaming services like Netflix have become our go-to place for fresh media. So, whenever we hear of a new project coming from the streaming service, we’re all in. Last November, Netflix announced a huge 6 project animated deal that will bring even more cartoon goodness to our screens. One, in particular, has us especially excited because it comes from animator and director Jorge Gutierrez. You might remember him from Nickelodeon’s “El Tigre: The Adventures of Manny Rivera” and the gorgeously animated “The Book of Life.”

Now, we’re seeing the first looks of Gutierrez’s new Netflix project, “Maya and the Three.”

Twitter / @mexopolis

Described as a Mesoamerican fantasy epic, the director sat down with VARIETY to share the origins of the project and the journey to get it made. Gutierrez was approached by Netflix with an alluring challenge: share his dream project with executives; the one he didn’t believe anyone would ever allow him to make. It only took him one pitch to win the streaming giant over and “Maya” was greenlit for production.

“So I sat down on Jan. 25th of [2018] and that was the first time I ever pitched ‘Maya,’” he shared with VARIETY. “No art, no writing, just an idea. And here I am 11 months later, knee-deep in production.”

It was Gutierrez’s goal to portray a “bad-ass female Mesoamerican hero” in a fantasy world of his own creation.

Twitter / @zette16

“I started seeing a lot of things I didn’t like as far as not having any lead females, especially in Mesoamerican mythology,” he explained. “So I said I want to have a hero who is a half-god half-human warrior princess.”

In the Netflix series, a demigod warrior princess named Maya embarks on a quest to recruit three legendary fighters. With their help, she hopes to save the worlds of god and man from destruction. The intention was to show Maya as a strong female lead and, to do so, Gutierrez pulled from his real-life heroes. The director credits his sister, mother and his wife, Sandra Equihua for inspiring the mythical heroine. Equihua is also a talented animator and acts as a character designer for the female characters in her husband’s work.

With his female lead in place, Gutierrez focused on the mystical world that “Maya” would be set in.

Twitter / @mexopolis

The setting for the Netflix limited series has been growing in Gutierrez’s mind since he was a boy growing up in Mexico City. He would wander the halls of the Museum of Natural History and makeup stories about what he saw. These stories would later help to mold the setting. Even now, the director has fun teasing his Twitter followers with hints about what the new series could look like. However, it’s the architecture from his boyhood explorations, Gutierrez’s fondness for skulls and the pantheon of Mesoamerican gods that have helped to create Maya’s world.

Due to the mystical quest and the fantasy setting of “Maya and the Three,” Gutierrez has taken to calling the series the Mexican “Lord of the Rings.” Still, it’s a fantasy first and foremost. The director wants everyone to understand that “Maya” is inspired by Mesoamerican culture but is not meant to be an accurate representation.

“I tell everybody that while it’s inspired by Mesoamerica, this will be as accurate (to that world) as ‘Rocky’ was to boxing,” Gutierrez shared with VARIETY. “It’s all fantasy and I’m having a blast playing with the history.”

The series will feature a number of talented Latinx writers, producers and voice actors to bring Maya to life.

Instagram / @thraxisjr

Silvia Olivas from “Elena of Avalor” is acting as a co-writer and co-producer for “Maya and the Three.” From Disney’s “Moana,” Jeff Ranjo is the head of story. Paul Sullivan, who worked with Gutierrez on “The Book of Life,” is the production designer.

Despite these important hires, animators were in short supply so the producer had to get creative.

“Especially in L.A., we are all fighting for basically the same people, so now we’re looking outside. Before we announced Maya, I would go online and look for artists who were already inspired by Mesoamerica and say to them ‘You already love this stuff, we love it too! Come to our team.’”

Gutierrez used Instagram, Twitter, and Tumblr to find animators that could do justice to the project. This modern-day recruiting system allowed Gutierrez and his team to find fresh artists with untapped talent to animate “Maya.” The results promise to be unique and beautiful.

The series is still a long ways away; it won’t debut on Netflix until its 2021 worldwide release. While it’s a long wait, the director promises fans that it is well worth it.

“Please have patience,” he told fans through his VARIETY interview. “This is gonna take a while, but we hope it’s unlike anything anyone has ever seen. We are so giddy every day and still can’t believe this is happening.”

This Short Film Centers Around A Black Father Doing His Daughter’s Hair

Entertainment

This Short Film Centers Around A Black Father Doing His Daughter’s Hair

When it comes to grooming a daughter’s hair, Black fathers haven’t been shy about expressing the difficulties that come along with the morning ritual. And Afro-Latino fathers are no exception. In Latinx communities with large Afro-Latino populations, having “good hair” is a label we all have to contend with. Young girls have a lot of pressure put on them to look put-together so, by extension, our families look put together. 

We all have memories of our mothers making sure our baby-bangs were smoothed down and our outfits were washed and pressed to perfection. 

Being well-groomed is so important to Afro-Latinos who face societal pressure to look perfect in order to combat bias.

Kickstarter

So, when fathers occasionally have to groom their children when their mother is unavailable, the pressure, needless to say, is on. We’ve all seen the genre of viral videos where fathers struggle to part, brush, braid and secure their daughters’ hair–obviously not previously aware of all the labor that goes into daily hair upkeep. Even celebrities have gotten in on the trend with men like Alexis Ohanian, husband to Serena Williams, joining “Natural Hair” groups on Facebook to learn more about their children’s rizos

Writer/director Matthew Cherry wanted to explore the topic of Black fathers doing their daughters hair, so he decided to make an animated short about it.

Kickstarter

According to Cherry, the short, titled “Hair Love” is about a Black father (who has locs himself) who does his daughter’s hair for the first time. “You know how guys are, a lot of times we’re hard-headed and we think we can figure everything out by ourselves without asking for help,” said Cherry during an interview. “[The father in the short] thinks it’s going to be an easy task but he soon finds out her hair has a mind of its own”. 

The father isn’t the only one who learns a lesson in self-confidence in the course of the film, though. In the end, the young girl also “comes into a level of self-confidence in the process” of her father learning how to do her hair. So, in other words, the entire film is an ode to self-love, family, and the priceless experience of bonding.

To finance “Hair Love”, Cherry created a Kickstarter campaign with the initial goal of raising $75,000. The campaign quickly caught the internet’s attention and became a viral phenomenon thanks to celebrity champions like Issa Rae and Jordan Peele. The $75,000 goal was quickly surpassed. All in all, the campaign raked in a total of $280,000–smashing Kickstarter’s short-film financing records. 

Cherry recruited Black animators like “Proud Family”‘s Bruce W. Smith and “WALL-E”‘s Everett Downing Jr. to help him make his dreams a reality.

As for Cherry, he’s candid about the reason he decided to explore the topic of Black hair and Black fathers: because mainstream media’s representation has left much to be desired. According to Cherry, not only did he want to shine a light on the labor of love that doing Black hair requires, but he wanted to highlight the relationships between Black fathers and their daughters. 

“For me, I just think it was really important to shine a light on Black fathers doing domestic things with their kids because mainstream media would lead you to believe that Black fathers aren’t a part of their kids’ lives”, Cherry said. “And there have been a lot of recent surveys that actually show otherwise–that show that Black fathers are just as involved in their kids’ lives as any other racial group”.

Now, “Hair Love” will be played ahead of “The Angry Birds Movie 2” in theaters nationwide

Kickstarter

The nationwide release will provide a massive platform for an under-told story. Not to mention, it will provide Black children with their own images reflected back to them–something many of them haven’t seen before. Not to mention, the security of a theatrical release has made “Hair Love” officially eligible for an Academy Award nomination. 

As for Cherry, he’s over-the-moon about the opportunity for his project to be seen by millions of people. “To see this project go from a Kickstarter campaign to the big screen is truly a dream come true,” he said in a press statement. “I couldn’t be more excited for “Hair Love” to be playing with “The Angry Birds Movie 2” in front of a wide audience and for the world to see our touching story about a Black father trying to figure out how to do his daughter’s hair for the very first time.”

We’ll admit: we didn’t have plans to see “Angry Birds 2” in theaters before we knew about this. But now, you might just see us on opening night, standing in line for the movie right next to our fathers! Catch “Hair Love” before  “The Angry Birds Movie 2” in theaters on August 14th.

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