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Donald Trump Thinks ‘Operation Wetback’ was a Successful Example of Mass Deportation

If you watched the last Republican debate, you know that is was more yelling and talking over each other, but did you catch Donald Trump’s reference to Operation Wetback? Well, it was there.

This was Donald Trump as he praised Operation Wetback, and yes, that is the real name.

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Credit: FOX Business Network / NBC

“Let me just tell you that Dwight Eisenhower […] moved a million and a half illegal immigrants out of this country,” Trump said during the debate. “Moved them just beyond the border; they came back. Moved them again beyond the border; they came back. Didn’t like it. Moved them way south; they never came back.”

So, what the hell was the GOP candidate talking about? “Operation Wetback” was implemented in the mid 1950s by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

#operationwetback

A photo posted by TheHolland (@the_holland) on

Operation Wetback was proven to be inhumane and deadly as many immigrants died during the deportations.

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Credit: @pinchicagoo / Twitter

People drowned after jumping from ships to avoid being sent back to Mexico. Others were sent to very remote areas with no food, water, or shelter and left to fend for themselves.

Are you serious, Trump?

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Credit: Jane the Virgin / CW / janethevirgin-gifs / Tumblr

“The Eisenhower mass deportation policy was tragic,” Republican Alfonso Aguilar, the Director of American Principles Project’s Latino Partnership told NPR. “Human rights were violated, people were removed to remote locations without food and water, there were many deaths, sometimes U.S. citizens of Hispanic origin were removed. It was a travesty — it was terrible. To say it’s a success story, it’s ridiculous.”

In some cases, Border patrol agents began rounding up anyone with Latino heritage, leading to the deportation of many LEGAL U.S. citizens.  The deportations often went unchecked.

They tried to get rid of you a long time ago ???✈ #muhammedhasni? #thunderdan⚡@dbgraup @gabe_graupman35

A photo posted by Zach Helwig (@zachhelwig) on

During World War II, the U.S. government was facing a labor shortage, so they set up the Bracero Program to bring Mexicans over the border to work for very low wages.

Families were ripped apart and the damage to the Latino psyche in the U.S. was palpable and lingering.

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Credit: @inglamwetrust / Twitter

READ: Donald Trump Kissed a Latina During an Event and the Things Got Creepy

Trump’s reference to Operation Wetback is drawing strong reaction from his usual conservative backers.

And they are pointing out the travesty that was Operation Wetback.

Even conservative commentator and FOX News anchor Bill O’Reilly told Trump how brutal and inhumane the deportations were.

Brutal
Credit: The O’Reilly Factor / FOX News / Wake Up Wolrd / YouTube

O’Reilly: The stuff they did was really brutal. It could never happen today.

Trump: OK. Well. I’ve heard it both ways. I’ve heard good reports; I’ve heard bad reports. We would do it in a very humane way.

Though Trump says he would get it “very humanely done,” he is still not able to clarify what that humane way would be.

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Credit: @ENDBORDERS / Twitter

But he promises that it can be accomplished with great management. #hecantbeseriouscanhe

READ: Donald Trump Reveals His Plan for Immigration Reform: Everyone GTFO

Watch Trump and O’Reilly’s full interaction on Operation Wetback here:

Credit: The O’Reilly Factor / FOX News / Wake Up Wolrd / YouTube

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Latinos For Trump Posted A Collage Of Flag For Hispanic Heritage Month And Got Some Wrong

Culture

Latinos For Trump Posted A Collage Of Flag For Hispanic Heritage Month And Got Some Wrong

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Latinos for Trump has long been a confusing organization in the Latino community. President Donald Trump has built his administration and brand to be squarely against people of color. Now, the Latinos for Trump group caused a stir when they posted a collage of flags that are not quite right.

Latinos for Trump really thought they had something when they posted their Hispanic Heritage Month collage.

The first, and most obvious mistake, is that the Mexican flag is backwards. The flag is supposed to be green, white, and red in that order. As we can all see, the collage has a Mexican flag that is red, white, and green. The eagle is even facing the wrong way so someone literally flipped the flag the wrong way.

Of course, some people tried to make sense of the bizarre Mexican flag snafu.

Last year, the Trump administration announced that it was cutting aid to three countries in Central America. The countries were El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Fox & Friends picked up the story but told their audience that Trump was cutting aid to “3 Mexican countries.” Perhaps this Twitter user is right and the Latinos for Trump are trying to suggest the existence of other Mexicos.

Someone else pointed out the issues with the Guatemalan flag in the top right corner.

People are very defensive about their cultural heritage and national origin. Messing up someone’s flag is a very serious issue for people. Just ask a Cuban or Puerto Rican about people confusing their flags. It is never a good thing.

Some people fixed the image for them so the organization can see what it should have looked like.

Good, clean lines with all of the flags facing the right way. The creator even changed the message in the middle for the Latino community. It is clear that social media is still willing to show up and teach a couple of lessons here and there.

Others had a more direct message for Latinos for Trump.

We all know that social media is where things go to be manipulated and made fun of. It is very important that if you make something for social media that you take good care to make sure that you check all of the right boxes and execute your work right the first time.

READ: In A Seriously Awkward Announcement, Vice President Pence Went To Florida To Launch A ‘Latinos For Trump’ Coalition

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With Immigration Fees Set To Increase, Advocacy Groups Are Hosting “Citizenship Weeks” To Help People Get Their Documents In On Time

Things That Matter

With Immigration Fees Set To Increase, Advocacy Groups Are Hosting “Citizenship Weeks” To Help People Get Their Documents In On Time

Damen Wood / Getty Images

Becoming a U.S. resident or citizen has never been an easy process. The country’s immigration system is a convoluted mess that sharply leans in favor of high-wealth individuals and under the Trump administration that is becoming more apparent than ever.

But 2020 has been an especially challenging year for immigrants seeking to complete their citizenship process.

Although it’s common for interest in naturalization to spike in the months leading up to presidential elections, the Coronavirus pandemic forced the citizenship process to a grinding halt in March. The outbreak shut offices of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) all across the country. And although many of these offices reopened in July, there is a widening backlog of applications.

Meanwhile, on October 2, looming fee increases could leave applications and citizenship out of reach for tens of thousands of immigrants, as the process becomes significantly more costly.

Many migrant advocacy groups are hosting events meant to help immigrants complete their applications before prices are set to rise.

In South Florida, the Office of New Americans (ONA) — a public-private partnership between Miami-Dade County and non-profit legal service providers — launched its second Miami Citizenship Week on Sept. 11. This 10-day event is designed to help immigrants with free legal support so participants can beat the October 2 deadline.

In addition, the event will host a mix of celebrations meant to highlight the social and economic contributions of South Florida’s large immigrant communities.

“I think in Miami we talk about how we are diverse and how we are adjacent to Latin America, but we never take a moment to celebrate immigrants and the amazing work that they do whether it’s the nurses in our hospitals, the drivers that drive our buses, small business owners,” said Krystina François, ONA’s executive director. “We need to reclaim the narrative around immigrants and around our communities because it’s what makes us great.”

However, thanks to Covid-19 restrictions, the events will all be hosted online.

Much like any other event, Covid-19 has greatly impacted this year’s “Citizenship Week.” Therefore, the event will be hosted virtually. That includes the Mega Citizenship Clinic, which will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 16-20. At the event, pro-bono lawyers from the American Immigration Lawyers Association, Americans for Immigrant Justice and other groups will connect with attendees one-on-one on Zoom and walk them through the process of filling out the 20-page citizenship application form. 

The clinic is open to immigrants eligible to become naturalized citizens, meaning permanent residents who have had a green card for at least five years.

Cities like Dallas are also getting in on similar events, meant to welcome new residents and citizens into the city.

Dallas’ Office of Welcoming Communities and Immigrant Affairs is hosting a series of virtual events from Sept. 12 to Sept. 20 in honor of Welcoming Week. The virtual events aim to promote Dallas’ diverse communities and to unite all residents, including immigrants and refugees.

According to the City of Dallas, this year’s theme is Creating Home Together, and it emphasizes the importance of coming together as a community to build a more inclusive city for everyone.

Participants will be able to learn about the voting process and what will be on the next ballot during the “Vontando Por Mi Familia: Enterate para que vas a votar” event. The event, hosted in partnership with Mi Familia, will be presented in Spanish.

A Council Member, Jaime Resendez, will host a virtual program on Tuesday at 11 a.m. that celebrates Latinx art and culture. The event will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Mayor Eric Johnson will read the Welcoming Week Proclamation, and the event will feature art exhibitions and performances showcasing the talents of performers and artists across Dallas.

Attendees will also have a chance to learn more about the availability of DACA and a citizenship workshop will take place where articipants will learn how to complete their N-400 application for citizenship. Volunteer immigration attorneys and accredited representatives from the Department of Justice will be there for assistance.

The events come as fees for several immigration proceedings are set to rise by dramatic amounts come October 1.

Starting on October 2, the financial barrier will grow even taller for many immigrants as fees are set to increase. The fee to apply for U.S. citizenship will increase from $640 to $1,160 if filed online, or $ 1,170 in paper filing, a more than 80% increase in cost. 

“In the middle of an economic downturn, an increase of $520 is a really big amount,” François told the Miami-Herald.

Aside from the fee increase, many non-citizen immigrants never truly felt the need to become citizens. That was until the Coronavirus pandemic hit and had many questioning their status in the country.

“There are people who up until this COVID crisis, their status as a permanent resident didn’t impact their day-to-day life … but then the pandemic has given them another reason of why it’s important to take that extra step and become a citizen, because of the additional rights and protections that are afforded to you, but also to just have a sense of security and stability in a crisis.”

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