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Watch The Real Dolores Huerta Get Owned By The Woman Who Once Portrayed Her In A Movie

Like something out of a movie, Dolores Huerta and Rosario Dawson are airing out their beef for the world to see. Dawson, who played Huerta in the 2014 Cesar Chavez biopic, went at the civil rights activist after Huerta’s take down of Bernie Sanders and his record. Clearly, the real Huerta and pretend Huerta agree helping the Latino community is super important, but they just can’t agree on how.

It all started, when Huerta wrote a Medium piece on Bernie Sanders’s immigration record.

Credit: @AKochergaBorder / Twitter

“If you’ve been following the Democratic primary, you may have noticed that Bernie Sanders has positioned himself as a champion of the immigrant community,” reads the opening paragraph of Huerta’s op-ed. “From the letter he sent to Barack Obama last week, to the work he, his campaign, and surrogates have done attacking other candidates’ positions, you would think that he has been a lifelong champion on issues that matter to Latinos and immigrants. But here’s the truth: Candidate Bernie Sanders, advocate for immigrants, is not the same as Senator Bernie Sanders.”

Huerta did not hold back on her criticism of Sanders…like, at all.

Credit: @thinkprogress / Twitter

She even pointed out the absence of Sanders’s signature on a 2011 letter to President Barack Obama in defense of the DREAM Act, along with his vote to beef up border patrol.

Huerta’s article definitely left many Clinton supporters looking like…

Credit: The Voice / NBC / The Voice / Giphy

#ShadeKnowsNoAge

Enter Rosario Dawson and her scathing open letter to Huerta.

Credit: @rosariodawson / Twitter

Although Dawson started by thanking the civil rights pioneer for her diligent work helping Latinos, the pleasantries didn’t last:

“This is exactly why your article on Bernie Sanders came as such a surprise to me,” Dawson wrote. “That the same woman who has made it her life’s mission to speak the truth and shed light on corruption, lies, and false narratives created by the corporate elite and special interest groups, would now suddenly create a narrative that distorts facts and misguides American voters.”

Liiike, you know some sh*t is about to go down.

Credit: Broad City / Comedy Central / Broad City / Giphy

Dawson went full savage on Huerta, going point by point on her piece.

Dawson went straight to work, addressing each and every one of Huerta’s points.

With the inestimable #DoloresHuerta at the #SXSW premiere of #Chavez #CesarChavez #SiSePuede! @DoloresHuerta

A photo posted by rosariodawson (@rosariodawson) on

Credit: @rosariodawson / Instagram

Dawson wrote:

“3. You mention that Bernie did not sign Harry Reid’s letter to president Obama in 2011:

— The letter was written and issued by 22 Senate Democrats. It was not presented to the entire Senate for signature, nor to Bernie Sanders (an independent at the time), and was signed by only a small fraction of the Democratic Party.

— Hillary Clinton did not respond to the letter sent to Obama. She did not denounce the deportations at that time, which makes the whole mention of the letter unreasonable.”

She even included handy tables comparing the two candidates side by side. One on positions…

 

Credit: Rosario Dawson / Huffington Post

…and one on specific votes and moments that occurred when Sanders and Clinton were in the Senate.

Credit: Rosario Dawson / Huffington Post

But here’s the takeaway. This is what democracy looks like: two passionate people, discussing issues and trying to find the best way to compromise and progress.

Credit: @DoloresHuerta / Twitter

It might look nasty and ugly at times, but it is honestly the way things get done. Thank you Huerta and Dawson for holding tight to your side and not backing down. This is what America is all about.

You can read Dolores Huerta’s op-ed here. You can read Rosario Dawson’s response here.

READ: Latinos are Pissed at Dolores Huerta, Here’s Why

Register to vote today by downloading the Latinos Vote app for iOS and Android. Our voice matters. #WeAreAmerica

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9 Films, Docs and Series About Latinas to Watch Before Women’s History Month Comes to an End

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9 Films, Docs and Series About Latinas to Watch Before Women’s History Month Comes to an End

Whether you want to celebrate Women’s History Month with a movie night or appreciate media about powerful mujeres year-round, you’re probably looking for a few films, documentaries or TV series to add to your streaming queue right now. Regrettably (and shamefully), most of the lists cropping on entertainment news sites don’t feature projects made for, by or about Latinas. With that in mind, we’ve put together some titles centering narratives about Latina trailblazers and heroines from Latin American and U.S. history. So clear your weekend cal and purchase all of your fave movie theater snacks, because you can watch (most of) these films, documentaries and series right from your computer screen.

1. Dolores

If you’re looking for documentaries about Latina heroines, start with Dolores, the 2017 film about the life and activism of Chicana labor union activist Dolores Huerta. The doc, executive produced by Carlos Santana and Benjamin Bratt, and directed by Bratt’s brother, Peter, delves into how the 90-year-old co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (later named the United Farm Workers), her famous “Sí se puede” rallying cry and her role in the women’s rights movement. Including interviews with Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and more, Dolores celebrates the history and ongoing activism of one of the country’s most critical civil rights leaders. Watch Dolores on Amazon Prime.

2. Isabel: The Intimate Story Of Isabel Allende

Isabel: The Intimate Story Of Isabel Allende, a three-part docuseries about the famed Chilean author and feminist, is one of the most exciting new drops. The HBO Max series, directed by Rodrigo Bazaes, premiered on March 12, just in time for Women’s History Month. Like all good biopics, Isabel reveals the person behind the icon, portraying Allende’s path from a young woman fighting her way into a male-dominated industry to the most-read Spanish-language author of all time. As the niece of assassinated Chilean President Salvador Allende, the series also gets political, bringing light to her life under the regime of General Augusto Pinochet as well as her own feminist activism. Watch Isabel on HBO Max.

3. Knock Down the House

Knock Down the House portrays the political rise of a Latina icon in the making: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. While the 2019 documentary by Rachel Lears revolves around the 2018 congressional primary campaigns of four progressive women, Ocasio-Cortez, Amy Vilela, Cori Bush and Paula Jean Swearengin, the Puerto Rican now-congresswoman is the only one who wins her race (though Bush won in the next election cycle) and thus much of the film focuses on her story. A first-time candidate with a passion for social justice, a degree in international relations and economics, and a job in bartending, the doc shows how a regular, degular, shmegular girl from the Bronx unseated one of the most powerful Democrats in Congress with a progressive platform and a focus on community. Watch Knock Down the House on Netflix.

4. Lorena: Light-Footed Woman

In 2017, María Lorena Ramírez’s name made international headlines when the young woman defeated 500 other runners from 12 different countries at the Ultra Trail Cerro Rojo in Puebla, Mexico. Ramírez didn’t just stand out because of her speed but also because she ran without professional gear. Instead, she donned the traditional clothes of the Tarahumara, Indigenous people in Chihuahua, Mexico, including a floral skirt and a pair of huaraches. Capturing the world’s attention, Ramírez became the focus of the 2019 documentary Lorena: Light-Footed Woman, which was directed by Juan Carlos Rulfo. The short doc beautifully tells the tale of a young woman’s athletic training in the mountains where she grew up to become a celebrated long-distance runner while staying true to her culture and traditions. Lorena: Light-Footed Woman is streaming on Netflix.

5. Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied!

In Honduras, the most dangerous country in the world for land defenders, Berta Cáceres’ life was taken because of her commitment to the environmental justice struggle. Back in the Central American country, Berta’s assassination hasn’t been forgotten and neither has her fight. The 2017 short doc Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied!, directed by Sam Vinal, shows how her work lives on among Indigenous Lenca and Afro-Indigenous Garifuna people of Honduras, who continue to struggle against capitalism, patriarchy, racism and homophobia, for our land and our water. Watch Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied! on Vimeo.

6. Celia

Celia reveals the story of one of the most powerful voices and greatest icons of Latin music, Afro-Cubana salsera Celia Cruz. The Spanish-language novela, produced by Fox Telecolombia for RCN Televisión and Telemundo, starts at the beginning, when Cruz was an aspiring singer in Havana, and takes viewers through to her time joining La Sonora Matancera, leaving her homeland with her would-be husband Pedro Knight and gaining massive superstardom as the “Queen of Salsa.” Watch Celia on AppleTV+.

7. Beauties of the Night

In the first half of the 20th century, showgirls dominated the entertainment scene in Latin America. Their glamorous looks and luxe performances were enjoyed by audiences of all ages and genders. But around the 1970s, as VHS pornos took off, these scantily clad talents started to lose work and, as a result, their lucrative incomes. Oftentimes, these women came from low-income backgrounds and didn’t have a formal education, forcing many of the vedettes to also feel like they’ve lost their sense of purpose and impelling some to take on work they didn’t feel good about in order to stay afloat in the industry. In Beauties of the Night, directed by María José Cuevas, we see some of Mexico and South America’s leading showgirls, Olga Breeskin, Lyn May, Rossy Mendoza, Wanda Seux and Princesa Yamal, and how their lives transformed as the work they were once famous for lost its reverence. Watch Beauties of the Night on Netflix.

8. Frida

The 2002 biographical drama film Frida shares the professional and private life of one of the most famous woman artists of all time, Frida Kahlo. Directed by Julie Taymor and starring Salma Hayek, the Academy Award-nominated film touches on many aspects of the late Mexican artist and feminist’s life, from her life-altering accident in 1922 and her tumultuous relationship with muralist Diego Rivera to her bisexual identity, political affiliations and, of course, her time-defying art and self portraits. Watch Frida on Amazon Prime.

9. Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go For It


With a career spanning 70 years, Rita Moreno is one of the most famous and beloved actresses of all time. The only Latina to have won all four major annual U.S. entertainment awards, an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony, her own life is certainly worthy of a film; and in 2021, director Mariem Pérez Riera gave the Puerto Rican star what she deserves with Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go for It. The documentary, which premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival on January 29, 2021, features interviews with Moreno, Eva Longoria, Gloria Estefan, Normal Lear, Whoopi Goldberg and more. More than just a celebration of all the barriers Moreno broke, the film also delves into her personal life, including the racism she endured on her road to stardom, the sexual violence she experienced in Hollywood, her struggle with mental health and suicidal ideation and her fight for multidimensional roles for people of color. While Rita Moreno: Just A Girl Who Decided To Go For It isn’t streaming yet, it is set to air on PBS’ American Masters later this year.

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Rosario Dawson Talks About Adopting Her Daughter When She Was 11-Years-Old: ‘It Was Clearly Meant to Be–She’s My Kid’

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Rosario Dawson Talks About Adopting Her Daughter When She Was 11-Years-Old: ‘It Was Clearly Meant to Be–She’s My Kid’

Photo via Getty Images

Rosario Dawson is opening up about a topic that’s near and dear to her heart that’s not talked about very much in the media: adoption. In 2014, Rosario Dawson adopted an 11-year-old girl who was in the foster care system.

Recently, Dawson opened up about the growing pains her and her now 17-year-old daughter, Lola, have went through together.

Although the actress of Puerto Rican and Cuban descent usually keeps her daughter’s life private, she gave the public a glimpse into their relationship in an interview with Health.

When asked to describe her “special bond” with her daughter, Dawson said that she was grateful for Lola’s “development, our maturation, and our connection.” She went on to explain how unique the experience of adopting an older child is than adopting a younger one. But Dawson explain that she is grateful for the differences.

“She moved in [with me] at 11; she’s 17 now and going to be 18 soon,” Dawson revealed.

“To have a young person move in with you and to have to really consciously work through triggers and that kind of stuff is a really different thing than being pregnant and having your baby grow up in front of you—to be able to see how we’re getting closer and closer.”

Like many people who are attracted to adoption, Dawson says she had wanted to adopt a child since she was a young girl, when she found out her dad wasn’t her biological father.

“I don’t know my biological father. Apparently, he died in 2011, but I didn’t have a relationship with him…I recall thinking, ‘What if my parents hadn’t met, and I was older, and no one wanted to marry my mom because she had an older kid?’ I remember vividly back then saying that when I was older I was going to adopt an older child.”

Dawson also explained the incredible story behind adopting her daughter, whom she knew through a mutual friend.

“I didn’t go to an adoption center or anything like that,” she said. “My family knew her biological mom, and when we found out she was in foster care, we looked for her. It wasn’t even a question; it was clearly meant to be—she’s my kid. It’s wild to think I manifested this when I was younger.”

We love seeing stories of diverse familias who prove that families aren’t about blood–they’re about bonds. And we love the fact that Rosario Dawson is shining a light on older children in the foster-care system. As Dawson summed up so perfectly in her touching interview: “We are a family, and it’s beautiful.”

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