#mitúWORLD

Here’s Why People Rush To Disneyland’s Carnation Cafe To Take Selfies With This Adorable Chef

Disneyland’s longest continuously working cast member (that’s what Disneyland calls its employees) is this Latino chef who was born in Brownsville, Texas, moved to Arkansas when he was around nine years old, then moved to California in 1956 and got hired at Disneyland just one week later.

This is Oscar Martinez, but most people know him as Chef Oscar.

Chef Oscar has worked in Disneyland for 60 years.

A photo posted by Cindy Classen (@cindy_classen) on


Oscar started working at Disneyland in Anaheim on December 29, 1956 as a busboy.

In 1967, he became a cook at the Carnation Café on Main Street, U.S.A.


It’s safe to say he fell in love with his job, because he’s been there ever since.

He’s a Disneyland icon with a dish named after him.


Oscar’s Choice: All American Breakfast was named to honor Chef Oscar and it includes his favorite breakfast potatoes.

People love to stop by Carnation Café to snap pictures with the chef who has his own hashtag: #ChefOscar

Lunch time visit from the #Disneyland icon. He's almost as cute as Mickey! ? #carnationcafe #chefoscar

A photo posted by Tracy ? (@doombuggymom) on


He still spends time in the kitchen, but most of the time he’s greeting and seating guests in the patio. And taking pictures, of course.

He’s 81 years old and has no plans to retire.


“No, I’m not ready for that yet. I’m not ready for retirement. I don’t want to talk about it because it’s way off,” he told ABC Action News. His work ethic is goals!

To honor his 60 years at Carnation Café, Disneyland made a one-of-a-kind custom statue for him.


The Cinderella-themed statue features Oscar’s likeness and has an inscription that reads “Thank you for helping to tell our stories for 60 magical years.”

WARNING: You’re about to fall in love with Chef Oscar.

Oscar Martinez, Longest Tenured Disneyland Resort Cast Member,…

Oscar Martinez, the longest tenured cast member at the Disneyland Resort, recently celebrated his 60th service anniversary! You can visit him at Carnation Café on Main Street, U.S.A. where “Oscar’s Choice” is a popular dish. Check out this video to see Oscar’s service award, created just for him at Walt Disney Imagineering!

Posted by Disneyland Resort in the Community on Thursday, January 19, 2017

Credit: DisneylandResortCommunity/Facebook

Learn more about Chef Oscar by clicking here.

Share Oscar’s story with your friends by clicking the share button below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Chloe Zhao Makes Historical Oscar Win By Becoming First WOC And Second Woman To Win Best Director

Fierce

Chloe Zhao Makes Historical Oscar Win By Becoming First WOC And Second Woman To Win Best Director

In its 93 years, the Academy Awards has only ever recognized only seven women in the category of Best Director. This is despite the fact that women have had a long and lasting presence in film history. This year, two women were honored with nominations at the Oscars this year. Emerald Fennell was nominated for her work on “Promising Young Woman” starring Carey Mulligan.

This year, Chloe Zhao, the director of “Nomadland” became the second woman in history to win the best directing award in nearly 100 years.

She is also the first woman of color to win the award.

Zhao won Best Director at the Oscars and became the first woman of color to win the award.

“When I was growing up in China, my dad and I would play this game. We would memorize classic poems and text and try to finish each other’s sentences,” Zhao explained during her acceptance speech.

She went on to recite a line of poetry in Chinese and then translated it in English, “People at birth are inherently good.”

“I have always found goodness in the people I met,” she said. “This is for anyone who has the faith and courage to hold onto the goodness in themselves.”

In addition, Zhao won directing awards from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, and the Directors Guild of America.

Despite the presence of women in the entertainment industry, only seven women have been nominated for awards.

American filmmaker Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win the Academy Award for Best Director for her 2009 film The Hurt Locker. Directors Lina Wertmuller (“Seven Beauties”), Jane Campion (“The Piano”), Sofia Coppola (“Lost in Translation”), and Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”) are the only other female directors to have ever been nominated for the best-directing award.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

Things That Matter

From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

One of the big surprises of the 2020 election was how even though most Latino voters across the U.S. voted for Joe Biden, in some counties of competitive states like Florida and Texas, a higher-than-expected percentage of Latinos supported Donald Trump. One factor that many believe played a role: online misinformation about the Democratic candidate.

Another important subject that’s been victim of a massive misinformation campaign is the Coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing vaccination program. But why does #fakenews so heavily target the Latino community?

Since the 2020 campaign, a large misinformation campaign has target Latinos.

Although fake news is nothing new, in the campaign leading up to the 2020 elections it morphed into something more sinister – a campaign to influence Latino voters with false information. The largely undetected movement helped depress turnout and spread disinformation about Democrat Joe Biden.

The effort showed how social media and other technology can be leveraged to spread misinformation so quickly that those trying to stop it cannot keep up. There were signs that it worked as Donald Trump swung large numbers of Latino votes in the 2020 presidential race in some areas that had been Democratic strongholds.

Videos and pictures were doctored. Quotes were taken out of context. Conspiracy theories were fanned, including that voting by mail was rigged, that the Black Lives Matter movement had ties to witchcraft and that Biden was beholden to a cabal of socialists.

That flow of misinformation has only intensified since Election Day, researchers and political analysts say, stoking Trump’s baseless claims that the election was stolen and false narratives around the mob that overran the Capitol. More recently, it has morphed into efforts to undermine vaccination efforts against the coronavirus.

The misinformation campaign could have major impacts on our politics.

Several misinformation researchers say there is an alarming amount of misinformation about voter fraud and Democratic leaders being shared in Latino social media communities. Biden is a popular target, with misinformation ranging from exaggerated claims that he embraces Fidel Castro-style socialism to more patently false and outlandish ones, for instance that the president-elect supports abortion minutes before a child’s birth or that he orchestrated a caravan of Cuban immigrants to infiltrate the US Southern border and disrupt the election process.

Democratic strategists looking ahead to the 2022 midterm elections are concerned about how this might sway Latino voters in the future. They acknowledge that conservatives in traditional media and the political establishment have pushed false narratives as well, but say that social media misinformation deserves special attention: It appears to be a growing problem, and it can be hard to track and understand.

Some believe that Latinos may be more likely to believe a message shared by friends, family members, or people from their cultural community in a WhatsApp or Telegram group rather than an arbitrary mainstream US news outlet; research has found that people believe news articles more when they’re shared by people they trust.

Fake news is also impacting our community’s response to the pandemic.

Vaccination programs work best when as many people as possible get vaccinated, but Latinos in the United States are getting inoculated at lower rates.

In Florida, for example, Latinos are 27% of the population but they’ve made up only about 17% of COVID-19 vaccinations so far, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. And Latinos are relying on social media and word-of-mouth for information on vaccines — even when it’s wrong. There’s myths circulating around the vaccine, whether you can trust it and the possible the long-term effects.

And it’s not just obstacles to getting information in Spanish, but also in many of the native Mayan indigenous languages that farmworkers speak in South Florida.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com