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Here’s Why People Rush To Disneyland’s Carnation Cafe To Take Selfies With This Adorable Chef

Disneyland’s longest continuously working cast member (that’s what Disneyland calls its employees) is this Latino chef who was born in Brownsville, Texas, moved to Arkansas when he was around nine years old, then moved to California in 1956 and got hired at Disneyland just one week later.

This is Oscar Martinez, but most people know him as Chef Oscar.

Chef Oscar has worked in Disneyland for 60 years.

A photo posted by Cindy Classen (@cindy_classen) on


Oscar started working at Disneyland in Anaheim on December 29, 1956 as a busboy.

In 1967, he became a cook at the Carnation Café on Main Street, U.S.A.


It’s safe to say he fell in love with his job, because he’s been there ever since.

He’s a Disneyland icon with a dish named after him.


Oscar’s Choice: All American Breakfast was named to honor Chef Oscar and it includes his favorite breakfast potatoes.

People love to stop by Carnation Café to snap pictures with the chef who has his own hashtag: #ChefOscar

Lunch time visit from the #Disneyland icon. He's almost as cute as Mickey! ? #carnationcafe #chefoscar

A photo posted by Tracy ? (@doombuggymom) on


He still spends time in the kitchen, but most of the time he’s greeting and seating guests in the patio. And taking pictures, of course.

He’s 81 years old and has no plans to retire.


“No, I’m not ready for that yet. I’m not ready for retirement. I don’t want to talk about it because it’s way off,” he told ABC Action News. His work ethic is goals!

To honor his 60 years at Carnation Café, Disneyland made a one-of-a-kind custom statue for him.


The Cinderella-themed statue features Oscar’s likeness and has an inscription that reads “Thank you for helping to tell our stories for 60 magical years.”

WARNING: You’re about to fall in love with Chef Oscar.

Oscar Martinez, Longest Tenured Disneyland Resort Cast Member,…

Oscar Martinez, the longest tenured cast member at the Disneyland Resort, recently celebrated his 60th service anniversary! You can visit him at Carnation Café on Main Street, U.S.A. where “Oscar’s Choice” is a popular dish. Check out this video to see Oscar’s service award, created just for him at Walt Disney Imagineering!

Posted by Disneyland Resort in the Community on Thursday, January 19, 2017

Credit: DisneylandResortCommunity/Facebook

Learn more about Chef Oscar by clicking here.

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Jennifer Lopez Gave A Teary Speech About Change And Being A Young Latina While Accepting The 2020 People’s Icon Award

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Jennifer Lopez Gave A Teary Speech About Change And Being A Young Latina While Accepting The 2020 People’s Icon Award

Drum roll please… and the 2020 People’s Icon is Jennifer “Jenny from the Block” Lopez!

The E! People’s Choice Awards took place on Sunday and J.Lo took the stage to receive the People’s Icon Award in a stunning red dress. 

J.Lo was honored for her work as an artist, dancer, actress, and for opening the door for more  LatinX representation in the entertainment industry. She has been very successful, from starring as Selena Quintanilla-Pérez in the 1997 film to the iconic Versace green dress to her role in the 2019 “Hustlers” movie and her 2020 Half-time Super Bowl performance.

As J.Lo received her award on stage, she was surprised with a virtual message from Nicole Kidman and Renne Zellweger. 

Moments later, Emme and Max, Lopez’s 12-year-old twins appeared on the screen to congratulate their mom and stayed on the screen as support during J.Lo’s acceptance speech.

“Man, 2020 was no joke right? I mean before 2020 we were obsessing about winning this award or getting nominated for that award or we were caught up in who sold the most records or box office opening or crazy stuff like did we get the latest drop or the newest sneakers before anybody else. But not this year. This year was the great leveler,” Lopez told the audience as she began her speech. 

“It showed us what mattered, what didn’t. And for me, reinforced what mattered most: People, all of us, together,” Lopez said and took a pause as the audience applauded. 

“Helping each other, loving each other, being kind to each other. And the importance of that connection, that human touch. I realized that’s what I strive for in everything I do. To reach people, to touch people. I believe that’s what we all want, those shared experiences to know that we’re not in this alone.”  

The artist thanked her fans, family, and friends for having faith and believing in her even when she did not feel motivated. 

“You know I approach my career the same way I approach my life. I lead with life, I feel with my heart and I always try to speak truth in telling stories, singing songs. I do so with the purpose of bringing a little happiness, creating beauty and inspiring others to do the same. From being a little girl in the Bronx, New York, and having the privilege of performing on some of the biggest stages in the world, and even at the Super Bowl earlier this year, that was a biggie! I have seen and learned a lot and I am still learning. I want to thank you and tell you how much I appreciate you for letting me do that in front of you for all of these years,” she said.

J.Lo went on to speak about the struggles and doubts she faced as a woman and a Latina and gave an inspiring message to young girls. 

“As a Latina and as a woman, we have to work twice as hard to get the opportunities, sometimes my big dreams and my ambitions, it made the people around me nervous. ‘You can’t be an actress. You’re an actress, what you want to sing? You’re an artist, you won’t be taken seriously as a businesswoman.’ The more that they said I couldn’t, the more I knew that I had to. So now here I stand so very grateful knowing that the true measure of my success is not in box office numbers or records sold, but from the love that I feel from all of you,” a teary J.Lo said. 

“The true measure is inspiring girls in all ages and all colors, from all over the world, to know you can do whatever want, as many things as you want and to be proud of who you are no matter where you come from. I want them to know your dreams are limited only by your imagination, determination and their willingness to never give up. If I have touched you or them in any small way, then this is the greatest award I could ever receive. I accept this award with great humility and gratitude, and hope we can begin to heal as a country and stand together united and proud, and in harmony,” she said.

At the end of the speech, she gave a message to the Latino community in Spanish. 

“Y a mi gente Latina a donde quiera que yo esté y donde quiera que yo vaya siempre los tengo presente. Y es para mi un orgullo poder representar a los Latinos de todas partes. Con todo mi corazón y con todo mi amor gracias mi gente los quiero mucho y recuerden la vida es un tango y hay que seguir bailando siempre,” Lopez said before leaving the stage. 

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The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

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The Number Of Latinos In The U.S Killed By Covid-19 Surpasses 44,500 With No Signs Of Slowing Down

For months we have heard stories from our neighbors and our friends of people losing loved ones to Covid-19. It seems that with each passing day the degrees of separation from ourselves and the virus gets smaller and smaller.

Although this is true for all demographics, it’s particularly true for the Latino community. New data shows that although Latinos make up about 19% of the national population, we account for nearly a third of all deaths. These numbers are staggering and experts are warning that entire communities are being decimated by the pandemic.

More than 44,500 Latinos have died of Covid-19 in the United States.

It’s no secret that the Coronavirus has ravaged our community but now we have concrete numbers that show just how bad the pandemic has been among Latinos. According to new data from the COVID Tracking Project, over 44,500 of the nearly 211,000 people in the U.S. killed by the Coronavirus to date are Latino.

While Latinos are under 19 percent of the U.S. population, we make up almost one-third of Coronavirus deaths nationwide, according to CDC data analyzed by Salud America, a health research institute in San Antonio. Among some age groups, like those 35 to 44, the distribution of Latino Covid deaths is almost 50 percent; among Latinos ages 45-54, it’s almost 44 percent.

Experts say several factors account for higher COVID-19 death and infection rates among Latinos versus whites, including poverty, health care disparities, the prevalence of serious underlying medical conditions, and greater exposure to the virus at work because of the kinds of working-class, essential jobs many Latinos have.

Many Latinos who have been infected or died of the Coronavirus are front-line or essential workers.

Credit: Wilfredo Lee / Getty Images

So many of our family members and neighbors work jobs that are now considered “essential.” From building cleaning services, to restaurant workers, grocery store employees, nurses, and farm workers, our community is on the front lines more than any other community in this fight against the pandemic.

In fact, 41.2 percent of all front-line workers are Black, Hispanic or Asian-American/Pacific Islander, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, an economic policy think tank. Hispanics are especially overrepresented in building cleaning services (40.2 percent of workers).

Latinos also have the highest uninsured rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S., according to the Department of Health and Human Services. All of these factors add up to a dangerous and deadly combination that has resulted in the outsized number of deaths among Latinos.

Some are saying that the virus is causing the ‘historic decimation’ of Latinos.

Speaking at a virtual Congressional Hispanic Caucus meeting last week, a global health expert warned that the Coronavirus is causing “the historic decimation” of the Latino community, ravaging generations of loved ones in Hispanic families.

To illustrate his point, Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, read off descriptions of people who died on Aug. 13 in Houston alone.

“Hispanic male, Hispanic male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, black male, Hispanic male, Hispanic female, black female, black male, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic, Hispanic” Hotez said, adding that many are people in their 40s, 50s and 60s.

“This virus is taking away a whole generation of mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters, you know, who are young kids, teenage kids. And it occurred to me that what we’re seeing really is the historic decimation among the Hispanic community by the virus,” he said.

Dr. Anthony Fauci – a popular figure in the fight against Coronavirus – has also raised the alarm.

The nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, gave a recent update on the impact on the Latino community. He pointed out that hospitalizations among Latinos 359 per 100,000 compared to 78 in whites. Deaths related to Covid-19 are 61 per 100,000 in the Latino population compared to 40 in whites, and Latinos represent 45 percent of deaths of people younger than 21, Fauci said.

Fauci said the country can begin to address this “extraordinary problem” now by making sure the community gets adequate testing and immediate access to care. But he said this is not a one-shot resolution.

“This must now reset and re-shine a light on this disparity related to social determinants of health that are experienced by the Latinx community — the fact that they have a higher incidence of co-morbidities, which put you at risk,” Fauci said.

Fauci also urged the Latino congressional members on the call to get their Latino constituents to consider enrolling in vaccination trials so they can be proven to be safe in everyone, including African Americans and Latinos.

“We need to get a diverse representation of the population in the clinical trials,” he said.

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