Entertainment

Conan O’Brien Learns “No Mames” and “Que Pedo” and LOVES It

“Don’t Suck that Lollipop”

There are some phrases in the (Mexican) Spanish slang lexicon that we truly need to express ourselves — Diego Luna taught some of these to Conan O’Brien.

His reasons for the Spanish lessons were legit since 41 million Latinos speak Spanish in the U.S. To put this into perspective, Spain has a population of 47.7 million people. By 2050, this country is set to be the largest Spanish-speaking country in the world with 138 million Spanish-speakers! ¡No mames!

Which brings us to Conan’s first lesson. After a quick tutorial on how and when to use it, he jumped on the no mames train…although Diego had to stop Conan from using the term around children.

Now what happened when Diego taught Conan “¿qué pedo?” Watch above and find out.

READ: Your Favorite Movie Stars and Their Cheesy Telenovela Days

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Lin-Manuel Miranda Performs A Freestyle Song ‘OK Boomer’ And It’s A Hit

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Lin-Manuel Miranda Performs A Freestyle Song ‘OK Boomer’ And It’s A Hit

Team Coco / YouTube

There are seldom things to get overly excited about these days but people are still trying to make us all laugh. Conan O’Brien has been doing shows from his home like so many other late show hosts and even “Saturday Night Live.” Thankfully, Lin-Manuel Miranda recently joined O’Brien and it was magic.

Lin-Manuel Miranda and Conan O’Brien “collaborated” on a new song and it is already a hit.

“OK Boomer” was born out of two things: O’Brien being able to talk about his day in great detail and Miranda’s musical genius abilities and willingness to listen. At the beginning of the video, Miranda asks O’Brien to tell him about his day. O’Brien delivers a very detailed account of his day and in the end, Miranda took that information and gave us “OK Boomer.”

“OK, Boomer. When are you gonna leave home? I go to the Zoom, I enter the room,” Miranda sings. “I want to see if I look cute and if I can temporarily unmute with the space bar. So, I ask my son, ‘Hey, do I hit the f—ing space bar?’ And he says to me, ‘OK, Boomer.'”

The songs bring the two grown men to fits of laughter and it is clear why. The song is as ridiculous as you need to find some humor during these crazy times. It also shows that not even a quarantine can break the human spirit.

Fans are already loving the song because of what it is about.

The comedy of the song is enough to make people laugh and forget their issues for a short while. Who else doesn’t feel like their life has become so mundane that it is hard to find some humor? Miranda is there to show us all that there are things that will still make you smile and laugh.

Some people want to let it get them through the day.

Just listen to it once all the way through. It is a song that doesn’t get to wild and is hard to get annoyed with. It will make you laugh and smile. It truly shows the selflessness that Miranda embodies on his day-to-day.

Some people just wish they could be as comforted by Miranda.

For people isolating alone, it can be very lonely. With no one to talk to, it is easy to feel so disconnected from the world because we are all just tucked away in our spaces. Imagine being able to talk to Miranda and have him listen to you so intently that he sings you a song that captures what you said. Wouldn’t that just make you feel so seen?

Thank you, Lin-Manuel Miranda.

You are a small piece of the puzzle that helps us make sense and find peace in this whole mess.

READ: Anthony Ramos Recalls Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Advice About Not Having To Change How You Speak

Diego Luna Talks The Importance Of The Storytelling In ‘Narcos: Mexico’ And Why Mexico City Will Always Be His Home

Entertainment

Diego Luna Talks The Importance Of The Storytelling In ‘Narcos: Mexico’ And Why Mexico City Will Always Be His Home

Courtesy of Netflix

Netflix’s “Narcos: Mexico” Season 2 comes back to continue the story of enigmatic drug lord Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo and the subsequent rise and fall of the Guadalajara cartel he founded in the 1970s, with Diego Luna reprising his role as the mysterious Félix Gallardo.

The show depicts how Félix Gallardo’s eloquence and strategic thinking helped him attain a swift rise to the apex of the Mexican drug cartels. 

For a man of which not much is widely known about, Luna reveals in this exclusive interview with mitú how he was able to dive into his character.

When preparing for this role, Luna said there wasn’t as much research material about El Padrino (Félix Gallardo’s alias) compared to the personal stories of other real-life personalities, such as El Chapo. 

“The good thing for me in playing this role is this man was a very discreet person, he understood the power of discretion,” Luna says.

It was important to see what people said about him—what people say or feel when they were around this character, this perception of him helps a lot. I had to do research and see what was a common answer—people talk about how intelligent and precise and strategic he was, and that’s how I wanted to portray and build this character,” Luna told mitú over the phone. 

Season 2 picks up after the murder of DEA agent Kiki Camarena, with Félix Gallardo enjoying political protection at his palatial home in Mexico.

It’s evident in the beginning scenes of this second season that his rags-to-riches story is starting to unravel and a bit of paranoia is starting to set in that he may have a knife (or gun) at his back at any moment. 

A running allegory used by the characters’ dialogues of the Roman Empire’s eventual collapse and Julius Caesar’s ultimate end foreshadows what we all know will happen to Félix Gallardo—his drug empire will eventually collapse in a smoke of cocaine dust. 

From crooked Mexican politicians and cops to ranch hands trying to make extra money delivering cocaine across the border, the show demonstrates the complicity among the cartels and how far the cartels’ reach.

“Narcos: Mexico” attempts to show that good and evil isn’t always black and white. The story highlights the gray area where even those committing corrupt acts are victims, Luna explained. 

“Some of the characters that take action are victims of the whole system,” Luna said in Spanish. 

The side of Mexico shown in “Narcos: Mexico” has been criticized by some as a side of Mexico stereotypically seen in the media.

However, Luna sees it as a side of the country that is real and must be discussed in order to move forward.

“When this season ends, I was 10 to 11 years old [at the time.] That decade was actually ending. It’s interesting to revisit that decade as an adult and research that Mexico my father was trying to hide from me [as a child],” Luna explained.

Luna says that this type of storytelling is important to understanding the fuller picture of Mexico.

The need for this type of storytelling—the stories that put a mirror up to a country to see the darkest side of itself—is vital, regardless of how complex it is to write scripts about all the facets of a country marred by political and judicial corruption. 

“In this case the story is very complex, it’s talking about a corrupt system that allows these stories to happen. We don’t tell stories like that—we simply everything. With this, I had a chance to understand that complexity. The journey of this character is a presentable journey. Power has a downside, and he gets there and he thinks he’s indispensable and clearly he is not,” Luna said. 

Outside of his role on “Narcos,” Luna is a vocal activist and is constantly working to put Mexico’s art and talent on an international stage through his work, vigilantly reminding his audience that Mexico has culture waiting to be explored past the resort walls of Cancún and Cabo. 

“The beauty of Mexico is that there are many Mexicos—it’s a very diverse country. You have the Pacific Coast that is beautiful and vibrant and really cool. By far my favorite beach spots in Mexico are in Oaxaca, and all the region of Baja California. You also have the desert and jungle and Veracruz and you have all the Caribbean coast and the city is to me a place I can’t really escape. Home is Mexico City, and it will always be where most of my love stories are and where I belong,” Luna said in a sort of love note aside to his home country. 

As much as Luna can talk endlessly about his favorite tacos in Mexico City (Tacos El Güero for any inquiring minds) and the gastronomic wonders of its pocket neighborhoods such as la Condesa, he also wants the dialogue around Mexico’s violence to be shown under a spotlight, as searing as it may be. 

“We can’t avoid talking about violence because if we stop, we normalize something that has to change,” Luna said. 

Perhaps “Narcos: Mexico” can bring some introspection and change after all. Let’s hope the politicians are watching.

READ: ‘Narcos: Mexico’ Season 2 Picks Up Where We Left Off With Félix Gallardo And The Guadalajara Cartel