Things That Matter

Details About The Chapecoense Crash Are Emerging And They Are Heartbreaking

The soccer world is still in shock following the tragic plane crash that killed several players and staff members of Brazilian soccer club Chapecoense. Authorities in Colombia are still combing through the wreckage of flight LMI 2933, but some facts and findings are coming forward. Here is what we have learned so far.

A newly leaked audio recording from the pilot of LMI 2933 confirms early suspicions that the plane was out of fuel before it could land.


According to several news outlets, the pilot radioed air control to warn them that the airplane was experiencing electrical and fuel issues. “The plane is in total electric failure and without fuel,” the pilot said in the audio recording, according to CNN. Air control reports that they lost contact with the plane when it was about eight miles from the airport, just minutes from landing at Medellín International Airport in Medellín, Colombia. The plane’s altitude was 9,000 feet when contact was lost.

The co-pilot, Sisy Arias, was excited to be flying the Brazilian soccer team on her first flight as co-pilot.

aviation#My Passion#Loving fly✈️

A photo posted by Gabriela A. Paraviciny (@sisyariasgp) on


The Bolivian co-pilot was interviewed just before the flight as part of news coverage following the team’s Cinderella story. During a TV interview before the flight, she expressed her excitement of taking the soccer team to Colombia on a Bolivian airline.

“One thing that is very important to know is that the team is using a Bolivian airline to take them to Medellin, even though they are a Brazilian team,” Arias said in the interview.

Here is the footage of Arias and members of the soccer team’s final interview before take off.


Though devastated by the news of his daughter’s death, her father Jorge Arias is not blaming people, according to ABC News.

Alan Ruschel, one of the players for Chapescoense, was on loan from Internacional and was reportedly saved by a 10-year-old.

Bom diaa!! ?

A photo posted by Alan Ruschel (@alanruschel) on


According to EFE, police and rescue workers have reported that when they arrived they were met by a 10-year-old boy. He was able to direct the rescue workers and authorities to the crash site to start moving the wounded survivors to the hospital for treatment.

‘When we parked, a child came and told us where the wounded were located,” Sergio Marulanda, a local, told Sport.Es. “A policeman told me: ‘You’re the first to arrive, put the child in the truck and go to collect the wounded.'”

Ruschel posted a video with Danilo Padilha to Instagram, which has since been removed, just moments before the crash.


Padilha, a goalkeeper for Chapecoense, had survived the crash but later died while at the hospital.

“My heart is shattered and I am suffering a lot. It is very difficult. I never thought I would go through this. I can’t believe it. The despair is too great,” Padilha’s mother told Globo. It is not being easy because it is complicated. There is a different story every minute.”


READ: Brazilian Soccer Team’s Cinderella Story Cut Short By Tragic Plane Crash

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro Blames Indigenous Tribes For Amazon Fires

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro Blames Indigenous Tribes For Amazon Fires

jairmessiasbolsonaro / Instagram

President Jair Bolsonaro is blaming the indigenous community for the fires that raged in the Amazon. The fires set off international outrage as the rainforest faced unprecedented destruction by out of control fires. President Bolsonaro went against the rest of the international community during a speech to the U.N.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro wants the United Nations to know that indigenous people were responsible for the Amazon fires.

In a remote session opening the U.N. General Assembly, President Bolsonaro spoke at length about the indigenous communities starting the fires. He also used the speech to speak out against the criticism his administration is receiving over his environmental policies and his response to Covid. Brazil is currently the second most infected country in the world with the second highest death rate.

The Amazon has experienced increased fires since President Bolsonaro took office.

For the first seven months of 2020, 13,000 sq. km. (5,019 sq. miles) of the Brazilian rainforest have burned. This year saw the second-highest level of fires on a global scale with fires raging across the Amazon, Australia, and the West Coast of the U.S.

President Bolsonaro openly contradicted expert findings to fit his narrative.

President Bolsonaro claims that the humidity of the forest contains the fires. According to President Bolsonaro’s speech, fires in the Amazon only happen in certain areas because of how well the humidity can keep the fires in check.

“The fires practically occur in the same places, on the east side of the forest, where peasants and Indians burn their fields in already deforested areas,” Bolsonaro said.

President Bolsonaro’s speech touches on the environmental record his administration is known for.

The Bolsonaro administration has made dismantling environmental and indigenous rights since taking power. The administration has worked to limit the amount of land available to indigenous people and to open up Amazonian rainforest to miners, loggers, farmers, developers, and other uses that are damaging and contributing to the fires. Deforestation by these industries are largely to blame for the out-of-control wildfires that burned for a very long time in the Brazilian Amazon.

Activists are getting ready to fight for the indigenous community and the rainforest.

“We must denounce this political catastrophe that destroys the environment and our future,” Sonia Guajajara, head of Brazil’s main Indigenous umbrella organization, to NBC News.

READ: Under Bolsonaro, The Brazilian Amazon Has Reached Record-Breaking Levels Of Deforestation

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#BlackLivesMatter Is Trending In Colombia After Five Black Teens Were Killed While Playing On Their Street

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#BlackLivesMatter Is Trending In Colombia After Five Black Teens Were Killed While Playing On Their Street

Luis Robayo / Getty Images

Despite countrywide stay-at-home orders that are among the world’s most strict, and even cartel-enforced lockdowns, crime is on the rise across Colombia. The increase has been driven by massacre-style attacks on the country’s most vulnerable communities: Afro-Colombians and Indigenous groups.

The recent torture and murder of five black teens who had stepped outside to fly kites, has reignited the conversation on race and how the government can step up to make sure minority groups across the country can be better protected.

A group of Afro-Latino teens were found tortured and murdered in Cali, Colombia.

Five Black teenagers left their homes in a neighborhood in Cali, Colombia, to fly their kites and play on a recent August morning. The young friends, aged between 14 and 18, didn’t show up at home for lunch. By midday, their mothers were looking for them.

“The boys were found tortured, burned, with machete and bullet wounds,” said Erlendy Cuero, a social leader from Cali, Colombia’s third-largest city. “Right now, the people who live here are sad but also very scared.”

Community members recently led a protest denouncing racism and violence inflicted by the Colombian state, and demanding justice for the murdered teens and other Afro-Colombian people who’ve been killed.

The mother of one of the Cali victims said: “Because we’re vulnerable and black, lots of people think they can walk all over us and forget about what happened to our children. Don’t let it be forgotten.”

The brutal killings are a reminder to Colombians that ethnic minorities are the most affected by violence.

Credit: Luis Robayo / Getty Images

Colombia is a country that has grown accustom to violence, but the massacre of these Black teens has shocked the country as a whole. And it’s brought to light a very real issue of racism in the country and shown exactly which communities suffer the most: ethnic minorities.

The recent masacre has also illuminated cracks in the still fragile peace deal between the government and former-FARC rebels. Just days after the boys were found murdered, a grenade was thrown at the police station in Llano Verde. The attack injured 15 people and left one man dead.

“We can’t assure they’re related, but neither can we rule out that hypothesis,” said Jorge Iván Ospina, Cali’s mayor.

The communities that suffer the most from widespread violence, are the Afro-Colombian and Indigenous communities. They have little protection from the central government in Bogota. However, it appears that finally, Colombians are starting to realize that peace will never be possible without listening to those communities who are most affected by violence.

Massacres are on the rise across the country, despite countrywide stay-at-home orders.

Colombia has been under one of the world’s longest running lockdown orders thanks to the Coronavirus. However, the number of massacres carried out this year is record breaking. In 2020, there have been at least 43 massacres leaving at least 181 dead.

The majority of them are taking place in the country’s south-west, home to larger populations of Afro-Colombians and Indigenous communities. Although responsibility for the massacres remains unclear, the government is pointing fingers at drug cartels. Families of victims though disagree, saying that their loved ones had no involvement with the drug trade.

A frequent complaint in these areas is that there is no government presence, allowing elements of armed groups that did not accept the peace agreements made in 2016 by the previous government of Juan Manuel Santos to fight for control of territory. 

The massacres are at least bringing forth a conversation on race and vulnerable communities in the country.

From police brutality to government indifference, Black and Indigenous Colombians live very different lives from the rest of the country. They’re more often targeted for abuse by police, they’re more likely to fall victim to massacres, and the government affords them little in the way of official protections from discrimination.

The recent murder of the teens from Cali, is finally bringing the #BlackLivesMatter conversation to a country that has long denied the existence of racism within its borders.

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