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Details About The Chapecoense Crash Are Emerging And They Are Heartbreaking

The soccer world is still in shock following the tragic plane crash that killed several players and staff members of Brazilian soccer club Chapecoense. Authorities in Colombia are still combing through the wreckage of flight LMI 2933, but some facts and findings are coming forward. Here is what we have learned so far.

A newly leaked audio recording from the pilot of LMI 2933 confirms early suspicions that the plane was out of fuel before it could land.


According to several news outlets, the pilot radioed air control to warn them that the airplane was experiencing electrical and fuel issues. “The plane is in total electric failure and without fuel,” the pilot said in the audio recording, according to CNN. Air control reports that they lost contact with the plane when it was about eight miles from the airport, just minutes from landing at Medellín International Airport in Medellín, Colombia. The plane’s altitude was 9,000 feet when contact was lost.

The co-pilot, Sisy Arias, was excited to be flying the Brazilian soccer team on her first flight as co-pilot.

aviation#My Passion#Loving fly✈️

A photo posted by Gabriela A. Paraviciny (@sisyariasgp) on


The Bolivian co-pilot was interviewed just before the flight as part of news coverage following the team’s Cinderella story. During a TV interview before the flight, she expressed her excitement of taking the soccer team to Colombia on a Bolivian airline.

“One thing that is very important to know is that the team is using a Bolivian airline to take them to Medellin, even though they are a Brazilian team,” Arias said in the interview.

Here is the footage of Arias and members of the soccer team’s final interview before take off.


Though devastated by the news of his daughter’s death, her father Jorge Arias is not blaming people, according to ABC News.

Alan Ruschel, one of the players for Chapescoense, was on loan from Internacional and was reportedly saved by a 10-year-old.

Bom diaa!! ?

A photo posted by Alan Ruschel (@alanruschel) on


According to EFE, police and rescue workers have reported that when they arrived they were met by a 10-year-old boy. He was able to direct the rescue workers and authorities to the crash site to start moving the wounded survivors to the hospital for treatment.

‘When we parked, a child came and told us where the wounded were located,” Sergio Marulanda, a local, told Sport.Es. “A policeman told me: ‘You’re the first to arrive, put the child in the truck and go to collect the wounded.'”

Ruschel posted a video with Danilo Padilha to Instagram, which has since been removed, just moments before the crash.


Padilha, a goalkeeper for Chapecoense, had survived the crash but later died while at the hospital.

“My heart is shattered and I am suffering a lot. It is very difficult. I never thought I would go through this. I can’t believe it. The despair is too great,” Padilha’s mother told Globo. It is not being easy because it is complicated. There is a different story every minute.”


READ: Brazilian Soccer Team’s Cinderella Story Cut Short By Tragic Plane Crash

Our thoughts and prayers go out to all those affected by this tragic accident. Share this story with all of your friends by tapping the share button below.

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The Last Wild Macaw In Rio de Janeiro Visits the Zoo Everyday Because She’s Lonely

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The Last Wild Macaw In Rio de Janeiro Visits the Zoo Everyday Because She’s Lonely

via Getty Images

If you’re the type of person who constantly complains about being single, this story will most definitely resonate with you. In Rio de Janeiro, there is a macaw that experts believe is the only free macaw currently living in Rio. To make things more tragic, this Brazilian macaw is so lonely that she makes daily visits to her fellow macaws at Rio de Janeiro’s zoo.

Every morning, a blue-and-yellow macaw (affectionately named Juliet) flies into the enclosure where the zoo’s macaw lives and canoodles with her fellow species.

According to the staff of the Rio de Janeiro Zoo, Juliet has been making daily visits to the enclosure for 20 years. The last time a blue-and-yellow macaw like Juliet was seen in the wild was in 1818. So it’s safe to say she’s fiending for some company. The average lifespan of a macaw is 35-years, which means Juliet has spent the majority of her life as a single lady.

“They’re social birds, and that means they don’t like to live alone, whether in nature or captivity. They need company,” said Neiva Guedes, president of the Hyacinth Macaw Institute, to the Associated Press. “[Juliet] very probably feels lonely, and for that reason goes to the enclosure to communicate and interact.”

Luckily for Juliet, the Rio de Janeiro Zoo is launching a program called Refauna that is aiming to breed and reintroduce blue-and-yellow macaws back into the wild.

The Refauna program plans to breed 20 macaw chicks and give them “training” on “forest food sources, the peril of predators and avoidance of power lines.” Once they’re thoroughly educated, workers will release the birds into the Tijuca Forest National Park to live full, free lives. Some people are hoping that with so many macaws flying free out in the open, Juliet will feel less lonely.

But some animal experts are warning the general public not to feel too bad for Juliet. “We don’t want to project human feelings,” biologist Angelita Capobianco told AP News. I look at the animal, and see an animal at ease.” That’s nice to hear. We love a strong, independent woman who doesn’t need a man to thrive.

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Residents Cite Negligence After Mexico City Train Collapse Leaves At Least 23 Dead

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Residents Cite Negligence After Mexico City Train Collapse Leaves At Least 23 Dead

A segment of a Mexico City Metro train line with a history of structural problems collapsed on Monday night leaving nearly two dozen dead and many more injured. As the dust begins to settle, many residents of the city are already pointing fingers at local officials who have done little to ensure the line’s safety.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador has said that his government will allow for a transparent investigation and will “hide nothing” from the public but many have little faith in the government to do what’s right.

Mexico City Metro train collapses and leaves 23 people dead and many more injured.

A metro train traveling on an overpass in the southeastern part of Mexico City collapsed late on Monday, killing at least 23 people and injuring more than 70. One person trapped in a car underneath the wreckage was pulled out alive.

The two train carriages were seen hanging from the structure, above a busy road. This is the deadliest incident in decades in the city’s metro system, one of the busiest in the world.

A crane was sent to the scene to stabilize the carriages amid concerns they could fall onto the road, which forced officials to temporarily halt rescue efforts at night.

In chaotic scenes, anxious friends and relatives of those believed to be on the train gathered in the area. Efraín Juárez told AFP news agency that his son was in the wreckage. “My daughter-in-law called us. She was with him and she told us the structure fell down over them.”

Gisela Rioja Castro, 43, was looking for her 42-year-old husband, who always take that train after work and had not been answering his phone. She said the authorities had no information about him. “Nobody knows anything,” she told the Associated Press.

Mexico City’s metro system is one of the world’s busiest but has long suffered from underfunding.

Mexico City’s metro system is one of the most used in the world, carrying tens of millions of passengers a week. In North America, only New York’s subway carries more people every day. Yet the incident did not occur on one of the older lines, which have been through at least two major earthquakes in the past 35 years. Rather it happened on Line 12, completed as recently as October 2012.

There will be difficult questions for the mayor’s office to come about the construction of the line, including for several former mayors.

They include Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, who was in office when Line 12 was unveiled and who championed the metro’s expansion. He called the accident a “terrible tragedy”.

Mexico City’s current mayor has promised a thorough investigation.

The tragedy puts the spotlight on Mayor Sheinbaum and Foreign Affairs Minister Marcelo Ebrard, two key allies of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador who are both seen as early front-runners to be Mexico’s next president. Lopez Obrador said at the Tuesday briefing that his government would “hide nothing” from the public about the accident.

Sheinbaum, who has been mayor for more than two years, said the city was going to inspect the entire Line 12, on the southeast side of the city, which she said had been undergoing regular maintenance. She said the rest of the subway lines are safe, though she pointed out that as recently as January, the metro system had had another major problem, a fire in the main control room that stalled operations through mid-February.

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