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Details About The Chapecoense Crash Are Emerging And They Are Heartbreaking

The soccer world is still in shock following the tragic plane crash that killed several players and staff members of Brazilian soccer club Chapecoense. Authorities in Colombia are still combing through the wreckage of flight LMI 2933, but some facts and findings are coming forward. Here is what we have learned so far.

A newly leaked audio recording from the pilot of LMI 2933 confirms early suspicions that the plane was out of fuel before it could land.


According to several news outlets, the pilot radioed air control to warn them that the airplane was experiencing electrical and fuel issues. “The plane is in total electric failure and without fuel,” the pilot said in the audio recording, according to CNN. Air control reports that they lost contact with the plane when it was about eight miles from the airport, just minutes from landing at Medellín International Airport in Medellín, Colombia. The plane’s altitude was 9,000 feet when contact was lost.

The co-pilot, Sisy Arias, was excited to be flying the Brazilian soccer team on her first flight as co-pilot.

aviation#My Passion#Loving fly✈️

A photo posted by Gabriela A. Paraviciny (@sisyariasgp) on


The Bolivian co-pilot was interviewed just before the flight as part of news coverage following the team’s Cinderella story. During a TV interview before the flight, she expressed her excitement of taking the soccer team to Colombia on a Bolivian airline.

“One thing that is very important to know is that the team is using a Bolivian airline to take them to Medellin, even though they are a Brazilian team,” Arias said in the interview.

Here is the footage of Arias and members of the soccer team’s final interview before take off.


Though devastated by the news of his daughter’s death, her father Jorge Arias is not blaming people, according to ABC News.

Alan Ruschel, one of the players for Chapescoense, was on loan from Internacional and was reportedly saved by a 10-year-old.

Bom diaa!! ?

A photo posted by Alan Ruschel (@alanruschel) on


According to EFE, police and rescue workers have reported that when they arrived they were met by a 10-year-old boy. He was able to direct the rescue workers and authorities to the crash site to start moving the wounded survivors to the hospital for treatment.

‘When we parked, a child came and told us where the wounded were located,” Sergio Marulanda, a local, told Sport.Es. “A policeman told me: ‘You’re the first to arrive, put the child in the truck and go to collect the wounded.'”

Ruschel posted a video with Danilo Padilha to Instagram, which has since been removed, just moments before the crash.


Padilha, a goalkeeper for Chapecoense, had survived the crash but later died while at the hospital.

“My heart is shattered and I am suffering a lot. It is very difficult. I never thought I would go through this. I can’t believe it. The despair is too great,” Padilha’s mother told Globo. It is not being easy because it is complicated. There is a different story every minute.”


READ: Brazilian Soccer Team’s Cinderella Story Cut Short By Tragic Plane Crash

Our thoughts and prayers go out to all those affected by this tragic accident. Share this story with all of your friends by tapping the share button below.

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4-Year-Old Girl Accidentally Hung Herself While Climbing A Tree

Things That Matter

4-Year-Old Girl Accidentally Hung Herself While Climbing A Tree

A mother living in the United Kingdom is enduring a “hellstorm of grief” following the tragic death of her 4-year-old daughter. Just days after welcoming her twin daughters, Elise Thorpe was forced to learn of her daughter Freya’s shocking death after she climbed a tree near her home in Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire.

Just before her death, Freya was wearing a bicycle helmet when she went for her tree clim.

Freya slipped and began to fall off of the tree when her helmet strap caught on to a branch.

Elisa Thorpe is speaking out about the incident which took place in September 2019 despite efforts to resuscitate her daughter by emergency responders. According to Yahoo, “An inquest into her death in January 2020 ruled that she ‘potentially slipped’ and her helmet caught on a branch, causing the helmet strap to become ‘tight against her throat.’ She died in hospital two days later.”

Speaking about the incident Elise told The Sun “We live every day and night in hell, torture, sheer shock, and grief that can’t be comprehended.”

Elise told South West News Service that she and her husband “were on cloud nine after the long-awaited arrival and difficult pregnancy” of their twins Kiera and Zack. Speaking about the grief she experienced, Elise said that she would have taken her own life had it not been for the birth of her children.

Recalling the day of Freya’s death, Elise explained that her little girl had gone for a playdate.

“In the early afternoon, Daddy had to go off to collect the special milk from Boots pharmacy in Cowley for the twins, as they were allergic to cow’s milk,” Elise Thorpe explained about how her daughter had been invited to play at a house just a 10-second walk away.

Freya had gone outside without her mother knowing.

“I had a gut feeling I wanted her home. Shortly after, I saw an ambulance at the end of the road – I panicked, at the time not knowing why I was panicking,” Elise told SWNS. “I called my husband to say I was going to get her back from the house behind. He said, ‘No, I’m five minutes away, stay with the babies.’”

“I saw his car go past and not return from the little cul-de-sac. I knew something was wrong,” she went onto explain. After spotting her husband speaking with a firefighter, Elise “grabbed the twins and rushed to a cordoned area where she saw first responders working desperately on Freya.”

After two days of waiting at John Radcliffe Hospital, the Thorpe family learned Freya could not be saved.

“I never stepped foot inside my home again. This is something I also lost and miss to this day — my home,” Elise went onto say. “Had I not given birth only 10 days before we would have taken our lives in the hospital that night, without a shadow of a doubt… We have had so much support over the last 18 months and we can’t tell you all how much that’s helped us through and for that I can never thank everyone enough for the support, kind words and donations – even from those we’ve never met.”

“But we’ve also experienced scrutiny and abuse from people who’ve asked, ‘Where were the parents? How could they let her out alone?’” she added sadly. “It has caused family rifts from relatives and judgment all because people didn’t know Freya wasn’t in our care when this happened.”

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Once A Cartel Hub, Colombia’s Medellín Has Become A City Of The Future

Culture

Once A Cartel Hub, Colombia’s Medellín Has Become A City Of The Future

Medellín, Colombia was once home to one of the world’s most powerful cartels – Pablo Escobar’s Medellín Cartel. During the ’90s, drug gangs and guerrilla fighters controlled the city’s streets and few people ventured out the relative safety of their immediate neighborhoods.

That Medellín is a distant memory for many Paisas thanks to the fall of the cartels, but also to a distinct set of ideals and values that have shaped the city’s development over the last decade.

Medellín was named the world’s third city of the future and it’s leading in so many categories.

Medellín is nestled in a valley high in the Andes, and many of the city’s poorest residents live in comunas they built on the steep slopes. And although the city still struggles with high rates of poverty, city planners are working to bridge the divide between these poor communities with little access to public amenities and the core of Medellín.

The technology that helped save Medellín is not what you’d see in San Francisco, Boston or Singapore—fleets of driverless cars, big tech companies and artificial intelligence. It is about gathering data to make informed decisions on how to deploy technology where it has the most impact. 

Where most smart-city ­initiatives are of, by and, to a large extent, for the already tech-savvy and well-resourced segment of the population, Medellín’s transformation has for the most part been focused on people who have the least.

The city’s cable car system is one out of sci-fi novels.

Think of a gondola suspended under a cable, floating high off the ground as it hauls a cabin full of passengers up a long, steep mountain slope. To most people, the image would suggest ski resorts and pricey vacations. To the people who live in the poor mountainside communities once known as favelas at the edges of Medellín, the gondola system is a lifeline, and a powerful symbol of an extraordinary urban transformation led by technology and data.

“The genius of the Metrocable is that it actually serves the poor and integrates them into the city, gives them access to jobs and other opportunities,” says Julio Dávila, a Colombian urban planner at University College London. “Nobody had ever done that before.” As people of all classes started using the cars to visit “bad” neighborhoods, they became invested in their city’s fate, heralding a decade of some of the world’s most innovative urban planning

Designers have created safe spaces for all with parks and libraries.

The Metrocable succeeded in connecting Medellín’s poorest neighborhoods to the rest of the city – but where would they hang out? This lead to the construction of five libraries sprinkled throughout Medellín, all surrounded by beautiful greenery. These “library-parks” were among the first safe public spaces many neighborhoods had ever seen. 

The key ingredient of Medellín’s transformation, experts agree, is perspective: The city looked beyond technology as an end in itself. Instead, it found ways to integrate technological and social change into an overall improvement in daily life that was felt in all corners of the city—and especially where improvement was most needed. “Medellín’s vision of itself as a smart city broke from the usual paradigms of hyper-modernization and automation,” says Robert Ng Henao, an economist who heads a smart-city department at the University of Medellín.

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