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Colombia Just Made The Biggest Coke Bust Ever

Near the Panama border Colombian police made the the biggest worldwide cocaine bust. Ever.

Creidt: @juanmansantos / Twitter

Authorities discovered 9.3 TONS of cocaine under a banana plantation just waaaaaiting to be distributed.

Credit: swesthov / Twenty20

You’re probably wondering about that elephant. She’s there just to give you an idea of how much cocaine was actually seized. An adult elephant weighs 7 tons. Imagine that and then some. Yeah, that’s A LOT of coke.

This much cocaine has a street value of $240 million.

Credit: dxsobedient / Tumblr

“The biggest seizure of drugs in history. A hit against criminals,” Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said on his Twitter account.

So who did the drugs belong to and where is the owner?

Credit: joeyburger / Tumblr

According to the Defense Minister Luis Carlos Villegas, the drugs belonged to the Usugas gang.

Colombia is offering a $3 million reward to anyone who finds the Usuga leader.

Credit: @juanmansantos / Twitter

It’s a huge accomplishment for Colombia, but a small number compared to the 487 tons of cocaine the country produces a year.

Read more about this cocaine bust here

READ: The Craziest Boob Job Ever…It Involves A LOT of Drugs

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The Controversy Behind Delta-8 THC And Why Shoppers Are Buying It Up

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The Controversy Behind Delta-8 THC And Why Shoppers Are Buying It Up

There’s a new cannabis product that we need to talk about since it’s exploding in popularity across the country – especially in states where recreational marijuana remains illegal.

Delta 8 buds look, smell and taste (when smoked) like traditional marijuana, and it even contains a type of THC. Yet it is seemingly legal to buy and consume even in many states where recreational marijuana remains against the law.

What is Delta 8 and does it get you high?

Before getting too far into it, though, readers should be cautioned that products containing it have not been FDA-tested or FDA-approved. Delta 8, which is most commonly sold as an edible, is extremely similar to what we think of as typical THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main ingredient in cannabis); the only chemical difference is the location of a certain double bond. The effects are also super similar, the main difference being that the high from delta 8 is a little less intense, and reportedly gives you more energy than a typical delta-9 high. 

Many people stated they felt more of a “body high” with fewer mental effects. Many folks enjoy using it as a means of alleviating their anxiety and pain while still being able to think clearly.  

In most states, yes, Delta-8 is legal. There are 11 states that forbid it: Delaware, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, Rhode Island, and Utah.

These companies place a leaflet into the boxes indicating why it is legal as per the 2018 Farm Bill in case packages are inspected by the government or the Postal Service.

Whether or not Delta-8 is legal in your state has nothing to do with actual cannabis legality. For example, cannabis is legal recreationally in Arizona and Colorado, but not Delta-8. 

While CBD and Delta-9 THC (usually just referred to as THC) are undoubtedly the most well-known cannabinoids, Delta 8 suddenly, and seemingly out of nowhere, became immensely popular within the last year. 

Retailers who specialized in CBD before introducing Delta 8 in 2020 reported a drastic spike in sales to Newsweek, which they partly attributed to its supposed anxiety-relieving properties helping people cope with pandemic-related stress.

Anyone using Delta-8 THC should be aware it will turn up on a drug test as regular THC, and thus could cause one to fail the test should it exceed the accepted limit.

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Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

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Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

The gender disparity in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) jobs remains wide in Colombia. As of 2019, Colombian women hold 32.9 percent of all STEM jobs in the country.

Nicole Chapaval, the VP of education at Platzi, wants to get more women into STEM. As someone who found herself in tech, Chapaval understands what it takes for women to break into the industry.

Chapaval’s own passion for computer science started in her youth. Despite wanting her parents’ reservations about her career choice, she went to school to study software engineering.

“I learned how to code with Platzi. I was a student back in 2012 before I worked here,” she told mitú.

Platzi is a professional learning app targeting people ages 22 and older.

Photo courtesy of Apple

Instructors for the app are teaching livestream courses on programming, marketing, design, and business. The classes are available in English and Spanish.

Chapaval took an interest in content optimization practicing her coding on a personal blog while taking online courses. Starting out as a student advocate, the two founders of Platzi noticed her dedication and started to involve her more in the team.

As Platzi expanded, so did Chapaval’s job description.

Chapaval has been successful in her career. Yet, despite the success, she has seen the gender disparity firsthand. It has only further inspired Chavapal to work to get more women in their tech careers.

“One of my first jobs was in a company that was doing mobile applications and in this company there were 15 male developers and myself,” she says.

Wanting to engage with her male colleagues, Chapaval admitted to feeling weird when her enthusiasm was not reciprocated.

“I was always very extroverted and wanted to meet everyone [but] they didn’t want to talk with me,” she says.

Chapaval teaches 60 percent of computer sciences courses hoping to attract more women to the field.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“I think that representation is very important. So I try to be very vocal and very present with everything that we do in social media and in content creation,” she says.

Whether it be attending company livestreams or podcasts, it is imperative for Chapaval to have women witness others in the field to show the possibilities they can achieve.

Prideful, she also amplifies the achievements of other Latinas in STEM, like that of Diana Trujillo. Yet, she still expresses a need for more women to get managerial roles.

“I am very proud of Trujillo,” she says. “She’s from my hometown and she was in the NASA project that launched the Perseverance Rover. These kinds of things are great!”

Thirty-six percent of Platzi‘s more than 1 million students are women and it is growing.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“That’s very low,” she says, “but we doubled that percentage from 2018 so we still have a long way to go.”

A key step needed to attract more students is accessibility, both financially and in content. Platzi, Chapaval mentions, offers free programming courses that aim to be accessible to those with low internet connection in all parts of Colombia and Latin America.

It’s not just about what you are learning as an individual, but also as a team or a group,” she says. “That also adds to the working ecosystem of Latin America.”

Regardless of gender, age, or background, Chapaval believes “education is very important if we want to break these blockers.”

In fact, two crucial skills she believes everyone should know is programming and English. “I like to say that both skills have to do with communications; communication with machines and with other people in the world,” she says.

In a time when remote jobs are pertinent due to the pandemic, having communication skills is a valuable asset for STEM careers in any country.

“Programming should be a basic skill that schools teach as well because it’s not only [beneficial] to be a developer,” Chapaval says. “It helps you understand how to solve problems in a logical way.”

Chapaval is grateful for her personal growth in STEM and hopes that Platzi can help others grow.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“I hope [students] can create what they dream of with the coding skills that they can get with us and can show it to the world,” she says.

“Latin America is a lovely region and a lot is happening here,” she says. “I hope that if this community can get to know each other and create the next big companies and big solutions for problems that we have right now, I would [be] fulfilled.”

As the gender disparity in STEM slowly expands, Chapaval continues to vouch for women to speak up and push through in the field.

Proudly Chapaval says, “Latinas are very extroverted, and the tech and software engineering world needs more extroverted people [like us] to add to their ecosystem.”

The App Store featured Platzi for Women’s History Month.

Read: She Came As A Teen From Colombia With Only $300 To Her Name, Now She’s a Director For NASA

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