things that matter

By Day He Herds Cattle and Moonlights as a Cartel Killer

Cartel hitman
CREDIT:  DARIO LOPEZ-MILLS / AP PHOTO

Although he’s eliminated 30 people since the age of 20, this cartel killer has no regrets and feels his work is necessary to protect his community.

“A lot of times your neighborhood, your town, your city is being invaded by people who you think are going to hurt your family, your society,” he says under anonymity to the AP. “Well, then you have to act, because the government isn’t going to come help you.”

The 29-year-old defends his cartel’s territory near Acapulco, in the  Costa Grande of Guerrero and near the farmland that produces heroin poppies and marijuana.

He disappears people for various reasons, but mostly because they work for a rival cartel or have shared information. By ‘disappearing’ he means kidnapping, torturing, and killing. When he tortures he does it in three ways: simulated drowning, beatings, and waterboarding. He also uses electric shocks to the testicles, tongue and the soles of the feet. Most of the time he gets the information he needs and ends the ritual by killing the person and burying them where no one will find them.

READ: How El Chapo Makes $80K from a $5K “Investment”

Although he remembers the number of victims he’s killed and where he buried them, he doesn’t remember the person. “Over time,” he says, “you forget.”

Since there are so many cartels in Mexico, there are many more killers like him. In fact, since 2007 the number of the disappeared has reached 26,000 in the country, 1,000 just in Guerrero. But he says the problem is much bigger than the officials report.

Because he only has a grade-school education, he raises cattle for a living and does the cartel killing as a side job. In terms of his future, he says, “I don’t really see anything.”

Read more about this problem and the cartel hitman’s fears here.

Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

Did You Know that Mexican Food is Officially Recognized as Culturally Important?

food and drink

Did You Know that Mexican Food is Officially Recognized as Culturally Important?

Credit: @nomadicdivision / Instagram

Guys, Mexican food is a thing. What? You already knew that? Duh. But the rest of the world didn’t.

Famed Mexican chef, Margarita Carrillo Arronte, sat down with Pati Jinchi of The Splendid Table and talked about one of Mexico’s highest food honors — and about one of the biggest cooking taboos becoming a thing of the past. Let’s start there.

“Los hombres en la cocina huelen a cuacha de gallina,” Arronte remembers her grandmother saying. Roughly translated it means, “Men in the kitchen smell like hen’s poop.”

That’s right. One of Mexico’s most famous chefs was raised thinking men don’t belong in the kitchen other than to “carry the heavy cazuelas.” But the UNESCO award winning chef says that mentality is seeing its last days. Some of the best up-and-coming chefs in Mexico are young and male.

READ: How this Adorable Cooking Nun Became a Mexican Pop Culture Icon

Arronte also talks to Jinchi about how she has been working with a small group of historians and other chefs to have the United Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recognize Mexican cooking…and it’s official. UNESCO has recognized Mexican food for cultural heritage. So, we could say tacos are SUPER important, culturally speaking.

Listen to the Full Podcast Below (or skip to 11:40 to start where we get to talk Mexico):

Credit: Splendid Table

Now eating all those tamales is cultural appreciation, not just gluttony. Don’t forget to share this story by clicking the button below!

Paid Promoted Stories