Entertainment

Brazil’s First World Indigenous Games Highlights Indigenous Cultures from Around the World

The first World Indigenous Games are wrapping up this weekend in South America. Indigenous people from all over the world have converged on Palmas, Brazil to participate in a sporting event similar to the Olympics. But you won’t find volleyball or water polo there – the sports are all rooted in indigenous culture. Check out the photos.

2,000 athletes participated – both men and women. 22 countries were represented.

Standing strong. Standing #Indigenous. #WorldIndigenousGames #Lummi #Nation #JMPI2015

A photo posted by Temryss Lane (@temrysslane) on

Tribes got the chance to showcase their native garb and dance during the opening ceremony.

PALMAS, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 23: An indigenous man takes part in the opening ceremony of the first World Games for Indigenous Peoples in Palmas on October 23, 2015 in Palmas, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
Credit: Buda Mendes / Getty

Traditional indigenous music pulsed through the games for the past week.

#brazil #worldindigenousgames #indigenousgames #brazil2015 #brasil2015 #brazil #amazon #amazonia #Philippines

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There was tug-o-war…

Jikunahati…

<> on October 26, 2015 in Palmas, Brazil.
Credit: Buda Mendes / Getty

Jikunahati is a form of soccer that is played using ones head rather than the feet.

Blowpiping…

PALMAS, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 27: An indigenous man from the Matis tribe demonstrates the use of a blowpipe during the first World Games for Indigenous Peoples on October 27, 2015 in Palmas, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
Credit: Buda Mendes / Getty

And, of course, the World Indigenous Games wouldn’t be complete without canoeing.

PALMAS, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 27: A Brazilian indigenous native practices canoeing during the first World Indigenous Games on October 25, 2015 in Palmas, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
Credit: Buda Mendes / Getty

Though the waters in Brazil aren’t known to be the cleanest.

There was also an indigenous beauty contest where each culture was highlighted for its beauty.

Screen Shot 2015-10-30 at 12.34.34 PM
Credit: @XHNews / Twitter

The 9-day event was not just about competition.

Many of the participants and spectators took this event to share and learn from each other’s tribes.

Several indigenous people of Brazil protested during one night of events, causing the competitions to end early.

PEC215 is a controversial bill that is directly impacting the indigenous people of Brazil.

After the protests, the World Indigenous Games resumed and athletes took to the fields the next day.

Women's 100M race. As brasileiras dominaram. #worldindigenousgames #jogosindigenas

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What do you think about the World Indigenous Games? Share this story with your friends to show them how badass indigenous culture can be.

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro Blames Indigenous Tribes For Amazon Fires

Things That Matter

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro Blames Indigenous Tribes For Amazon Fires

jairmessiasbolsonaro / Instagram

President Jair Bolsonaro is blaming the indigenous community for the fires that raged in the Amazon. The fires set off international outrage as the rainforest faced unprecedented destruction by out of control fires. President Bolsonaro went against the rest of the international community during a speech to the U.N.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro wants the United Nations to know that indigenous people were responsible for the Amazon fires.

In a remote session opening the U.N. General Assembly, President Bolsonaro spoke at length about the indigenous communities starting the fires. He also used the speech to speak out against the criticism his administration is receiving over his environmental policies and his response to Covid. Brazil is currently the second most infected country in the world with the second highest death rate.

The Amazon has experienced increased fires since President Bolsonaro took office.

For the first seven months of 2020, 13,000 sq. km. (5,019 sq. miles) of the Brazilian rainforest have burned. This year saw the second-highest level of fires on a global scale with fires raging across the Amazon, Australia, and the West Coast of the U.S.

President Bolsonaro openly contradicted expert findings to fit his narrative.

President Bolsonaro claims that the humidity of the forest contains the fires. According to President Bolsonaro’s speech, fires in the Amazon only happen in certain areas because of how well the humidity can keep the fires in check.

“The fires practically occur in the same places, on the east side of the forest, where peasants and Indians burn their fields in already deforested areas,” Bolsonaro said.

President Bolsonaro’s speech touches on the environmental record his administration is known for.

The Bolsonaro administration has made dismantling environmental and indigenous rights since taking power. The administration has worked to limit the amount of land available to indigenous people and to open up Amazonian rainforest to miners, loggers, farmers, developers, and other uses that are damaging and contributing to the fires. Deforestation by these industries are largely to blame for the out-of-control wildfires that burned for a very long time in the Brazilian Amazon.

Activists are getting ready to fight for the indigenous community and the rainforest.

“We must denounce this political catastrophe that destroys the environment and our future,” Sonia Guajajara, head of Brazil’s main Indigenous umbrella organization, to NBC News.

READ: Under Bolsonaro, The Brazilian Amazon Has Reached Record-Breaking Levels Of Deforestation

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Vanessa Bryant’s Lawsuit Over Leaked Photos Of Kobe And Gianna Inspired New Law

Entertainment

Vanessa Bryant’s Lawsuit Over Leaked Photos Of Kobe And Gianna Inspired New Law

kobebryant / lacosheriff / Instagram

Updated September 30, 2020.

Soon after basketball player Kobe Bryant was killed in a Jan. 26 helicopter crash alongside his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, and seven others, reports surfaced from the Los Angeles Times that L.A. County sheriff’s deputies had captured and shared photos of the accident site. Abominably, these images included pictures of the victims. Worse, deputies allegedly continued to share the photos in the days following the horrific accident that transpired in Calabasas, California.

During a time when she should have been allowed to mourn, Bryant’s wife Vanessa Bryant worked to file a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department alleging violation of privacy.

In response to Bryant’s lawsuit, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill this week to prohibit first responders from taking photographs of deceased victims ″outside of job duties.”

AB 2655 was signed by Newsom on Monday and prohibits first responders from taking photographs, not related to job duties, of deceased victims. According to KCBS, Violation of the law will result in a misdemeanor.

AB 2655 states that “Existing law generally prohibits a reproduction of any kind of photograph of the body, or any portion of the body, of a deceased person, taken by or for the coroner at the scene of death or in the course of a post mortem examination or autopsy, from being made or disseminated. Existing law generally makes a person who views, by means of any instrumentality, including, but not limited to, a camera or mobile phone, the interior of any area in which the occupant has a reasonable expectation of privacy, with the intent to invade the privacy of a person or persons inside, guilty of a misdemeanor. This bill would make it a misdemeanor for a first responder, as defined, who responds to the scene of an accident or crime to capture the photographic image of a deceased person for any purpose other than an official law enforcement purpose or a genuine public interest. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require an agency that employs first responders to, on January 1, 2021, notify those first responders of the prohibition imposed by the bill. By increasing the duties of local agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.”

The images of the crash site victims occurred despite a personal request from Vanessa Bryant to Sheriff Alex Villanueva on the morning of the crash to request the site be secured for privacy.

This was a legal claim filed against the department in May.

″In reality, however, no fewer than eight sheriff’s deputies were at the scene snapping cell-phone photos of the dead children, parents, and coaches,″ the document filed by Vanessa explained ″As the Department would later admit, there was no investigative purpose for deputies to take pictures at the crash site. Rather, the deputies took photos for their own personal purposes.”

Vanessa Bryant filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

On Jan. 26, a helicopter carrying Kobe and Gianna Bryant, Payton and Sarah Chester, Alyssa, Keri, and John Altobelli, Christina Mauser, and pilot Ara Zobayan crashed in the Calabasas hills. The sudden death devastated those who knew Kobe and the city of Los Angeles that mourned his death for months after.

Vanessa was shocked to hear that the sheriff deputies took photos of her husband’s and daughter’s bodies at the crash site.

“This lawsuit is about accountability and about preventing this disgraceful behavior from happening to other families in the future who have suffered loss,” Vanessa’s attorney, Luis Li, said in a statement. “The department formally refused Mrs. Bryant’s requests for information, saying it was ‘unable to assist’ with any inquiry and had no legal obligation to do so. It’s now for a court to tell the department what its obligations are.”

Bryant sued the department claiming damages for emotional distress, negligence, and invasion of privacy.

Kobe fans are upset with the LACSD and the allegations that the deputies took these photos.

According to TMZ, Sheriff Alex Villanueva knew about the photos taken by eight deputies and shared within the department. They were also shared in the Lost Hills Sheriff’s substation. Sheriff Villanueva told the deputies to delete the photos from their phones and felt confident they did so.

A trainee allegedly shared the photos with a woman in a bar.

A witness to the event said that a trainee took out his phone and showed a woman the photos to impress her. The bartender overheard the conversation and filed an online complaint about the trainee and their behavior with the photos. The trainee showed the woman the photos a few days after the crash leading many to believe that the sheriff’s department was fully aware of the photos.

Kobe fans are standing behind Vanessa as she follows through with her lawsuit.

Reports state that the sheriff’s department told deputies to delete the images to avoid disciplinary action. The coverup is sparking outrage by Kobe fans who are angered that the department did not do enough to protect the dignity and privacy of all of the victims of the crash.

Mitú will update this story as it continues to develop.

READ: Vanessa Bryant Forced To Respond To ‘Beyond Hurtful’ Comments Made By Her Own Mom On ‘El Gordo y La Flaca’

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