Things That Matter

This One Woman Could End This Politician’s Career

Evo Morales, Bolivia’s first indigenous president, is hoping for a fourth term with a change to the country’s constitution. But, his relationship with a young 29-year-old woman might just end his political career.

So what, right? Well, just so happens that Morales claims to be single and ready to mingle (we added the mingle part), but is in a relationship — and even had a child — with Gabriela Zapata according to journalist Carlos Valverde. Guess this relationship is in the “complicated” stage.

Morales has said little about his relationship, but admitted dating Zapata in 2005 and ending all ties in 2007, after their child died. However…wait for it…a picture surfaced of Morales and Zapata happily embracing each other at a carnival last year.

“I remember, there was a woman with a familiar face who approached me to take a photo during carnival, that’s true,” Mr. Morales said admitting to the photo. “It was a familiar face and when the photo emerged, ah!, I think that’s Gabriela.”

READ: A Teenager from Bolivia Created a Real-Life Wall-E and It’s Just the Beginning

Adding to this love scandal is the money scandal. You see, Zapata is an exec at a Chinese company with millions worth of government contracts and is living in a pretty lush house. Questions about this fuel the fire.

And while some Bolivians are willing to forgive Morales’ corruption scandal because they believe he’s helped the poor and protected the indigenous people, others say the scandal will stop them from going to the polls to keep Morales in office until 2025.

Read more about what might ruin Evo Morales’ political career from The New York Times here.

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Evo Morales’s Protégé Luis Arce Wins Bolivian Presidency in Landslide Victory: ‘The Will of the People Has Been Asserted’

Things That Matter

Evo Morales’s Protégé Luis Arce Wins Bolivian Presidency in Landslide Victory: ‘The Will of the People Has Been Asserted’

Photo by Gaston Brito/Getty Images

A new president–Luis Arce–has been elected in Bolivia. According to reports, Arce who has been hand-selected by exiled former socialist president Evo Morales to be his successor. Morales took to Twitter to celebrate the victory, which has all but rectified him: “Brothers and sisters: the will of the people has been asserted…We are going to give dignity and liberty back to the people,” he tweeted.

Throughout Bolivia’s most recent election cycle, Arce had been the frontrunner, with a pragmatic centrist candidate named Carlos Mesa trailing far behind him. Mesa conceded before all the votes were even counted, saying: “It is up to us, those of us who believe in democracy, to recognize that there has been a winner in this election.”

The peaceful nature of the election was, indeed, a surprise to many. The world seemed to be expecting mass protests or violence depending on the election’s results. NPR reported that Bolivians were stocking up on food and water in anticipation of greater civil unrest. But the election ran smoothly, and the results are considered a win for socialism, but a greater win for democracy and the peaceful transition of power.

The election results are significant because they prove that Bolivians are committed to, and do, indeed, support Morales’s Movimiento al Socialismo party.

Bolivia is an Indigenous-majority country and Morales had been the first and only Indigenous president. He had been president since 2004 before he was ousted in 2019.

Originally a powerful union organizer, Morales was very popular with the indigenous community, but nonetheless, a controversial figure throughout his presidency. He was beloved by many Bolivians for leading the country to economic prosperity through implementing socialist programs like universal education and paved roads. He also nationalized the oil and gas industry.

Although Morales declared victory in the October election, he soon resigned under threat of arrest due to claims of election fraud. He called his ouster a right-wing “coup” and has since been in exile in Argentina.

Morales claimed that the “coup” was due to powerful Western influences (like the United States and Canada) being sick of his anti-capitalist policies.

His critics claimed that he was cheating voters out of a fair election and had been in power far too long. These claims were backed by a report by the Organization of American States that claimed that the election results were marred by “irregularities” that made it impossible to guarantee the integrity of the data and certify the accuracy of the results.” The report has since been condemned as inaccurate.

After Morales’s ouster in 2019 and subsequent exile to Argentina, Bolivia has largely been in a state of political unrest. Jeanine Áñez, a right-wing politician who was a vocal critic of Morales, took over as interim president until a new election could be held. Áñez’s administration was plagued with reports of corruption and human rights violations. She was accused of using her political power to violently suppress and silence socialist protestors.

As for now, Bolivians largely seem to be happy with the outcome of the election. But with COVID-19 crippling their communities and economy, they have a long road to recovery ahead of them.

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People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

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