Entertainment

One Of Beyoncé’s Most Recent Videos Gives A Secret Nod To Mexico

BTS: The Formation World Tour (Fashion)

Posted by Beyoncé on Monday, July 18, 2016

Image Source: @beyonce/Facebook

Beyoncé’s team drove to Mexico for the perfect hat.

Beyoncé has the world at her fingertips. Literally any designer in the would would die to create custom costumes for Queen Bey. While she’s rocked dresses created by Balmain, Versace and other elites, she also looked to Mexican vendors to get something a little more… authentic.

In her Formation World Tour, Beyoncé is bringin’ sombreros back. The “Sorry” singer wanted a fierce hat, so they looked to Mexico.

“Nowhere in the world do they make these hats. This hat maker literally drove to Mexico to buy sombreros,” said Bey’s costume designer Marni Senofonte.

We have to say, her looks slay.


READ: Wait A Minute, Beyoncé And Selena Gomez Released Songs In Spanish?

What’s your favorite look in this video? Tell us in the comments below and share the Bey love on Facebook and Twitter.

Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

Culture

Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

NailzImage by Michelle Yip / Flickr / ljaebeauty / Instagram

Acrylic nails have been a long-time fashion staple. Many of us have those early memories of a tía, a vecina, mom, etc., rocking the long red nails. Today, fake nails are not just a passing fad, but they have become an essential part of pop-culture, wearable art. Most famously, Cardi B (who has worn acrylics since before she was famous and has remained loyal to her same nail artist Jenny Bui) is one of the celebrities that has captivated the world which her famous “sets” which, no doubt, has inspired millions of fans.

Acrylic nails have always and will continue to be a woman’s strongest style accessory.

Credit: iamcardb / Instagram

One of the most iconic sets is part of a special exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. Back in the 90s, Lil Kim (the original Queen Bee) asked her manicurist – celebrity nail artist Bernadette Thompson – to add something different to the nail design for a photoshoot for the Junior M.A.F.I.A. single “Get Money.” Thinking on her feet, Thompson cut up a dollar bill and…the rest is history. Thompson is credited with moving nail art into the world of high fashion since she often had to fight against editors of Vogue, and other big-name fashion magazines, to feature the nail designs worn by the artist.

They can tell any story you want and make any statement you can imagine.

Credit: Pinterest

However, acrylics have been here long before celebrities and Instagram. One of the most famous manicures has even held Olympic gold, thanks to Hall of Famer, Florence Griffith Joyner. “Flo Jo” – still considered the fastest women in history – not only was she an iconic Olympian, but she was also known for her distinctive fierce style and nails.

Credit: Pinterest

If we look at the history of nail art, India is the first to put color on the map in 5000 B.C. and are credited with being the ones to dip fingertips in red henna, a practice which is still seen today.

Different cultures across the world have incorporated acrylic nails.

Credit: Pinterest

But where did the concept of acrylic nails come from? The earliest traces can be found somewhere around 3000 B.C between Egypt and China. We can thank ancient Egyptians for almost every aspect of the beauty and cosmetics that we use today. They also introduced the notion of associating red with power and nobility. Noblemen and women would use berries to add red hues to their nails and if anyone from the lower class was caught with red nails, they were put to death. It is believed that the ancient royal Egyptians used ivory, gold, and bone to create extensions of their nails. Shorter nails implied that you needed your hands available to work, therefore, longer nails became a symbol of status, wealth and non-laboring hands.

Around the same time period, the ancient Chinese were the first to make a “permanent color stain” that would taint nails the same as nail polish does today. Here is also where we have the closest example to modern-day acrylics. The earliest dynasties created elaborate “fingernail guards” which gave the appearance of exaggerated long nails. The nail extensions were made of gold and precious gems; and as with the ancient Egyptians, long nails became a symbol of a someone that did not need their hands free for manual labor and therefore became a symbol of the ruling class. The ornate nails were usually worn on one hand, covering each finger (except the thumb) and only the most elite wore fingernail guards on both hands.

Credit: Pinterest

In both Egypt and China, higher-ranking men and kings also sported the acrylics and nail polish. When King Tut’s tomb was discovered in 1922, among his treasures they found the royal red nail coloring still in a sealed bottle, and the paint was still good.

Ancient Greece also got in on early acrylic nails. They believed in the healing energy of the moon and favored the appearance of moon shape nails. Greek women would place pistachio nut shells over their nails and in order to give a pleasing round appearance.

In South America, the Incas of Peru, are said to have been the first to have actually created nail art, by adding a decorative element – an eagle – to their nails.

Credit: Pinterest

Over time, artificial nails were slowly making their way throughout Europe and eventually made their way across the ocean.

In 1934, Dr. Maxwell Lappe – a dentist from Chicago – was working on a remedy to help his patients who bit their nails. Mixing two dental acrylic products – liquid and powder – he created Nu Nails. The mixture was thick and heavy, meant to create a hard nail protective covering.

However, these are the first official artificial nails documented in modern history.

Credit Pour L’ Image / Facebook

During the 1930s, starlets –  like Greta Garbo –  often tried to create their own “nail extensions” by wrapping foil around their fingers and then painting the foil red.

In 1957, twenty years after Nu Nails, another dentist – Dr. Frederick Slack – made a breakthrough. As the story goes, he broke his own nail and in order to create a temporary fix, he used dental acrylic and aluminum foil, and accidentally invented the first sculpted acrylic nail. The Slack family went on launch the modern acrylic nail industry and has since created several innovative products, including the first non-yellowing bonding formula, which is still used today.

The nail game is constantly growing and evolving.  Today, we are in an acrylic boom again, nails are not only a part of our fashion, but they can also be part of the larger conversation.

Your set can reflect your politics, religion, heritage etc.

Credit: Pinterest

Acrylic nails and nail art aren’t going anywhere, they have been here since the days of B.C. and will most likely continue to always be part of our human story. Although women of color in the United States are often chastised for wearing long and elaborate nails, it has never stopped us from doing so, nor should it. We are walking in the traditions of ancient royals and nobility – men and women – so continue to hold your head high, pick your colors, add some bling and don’t be shy; tú dale, and make the ancient world proud…live boldly.

READ: Cardi B’s Blinged Out Nails Have Inspired Reebok New Dazzling Limited-Edition Shoe

Juan Gabriel’s Style Is Getting A Second Look Thanks To…Harry Styles?

Entertainment

Juan Gabriel’s Style Is Getting A Second Look Thanks To…Harry Styles?

Should this story have a breaking news qualifier? Harry Styles appears to be rather blatantly copying Juanga’s style. Whether you love this or hate this, you have got to find it intriguing as hell. It’s just so odd, right? In what scenario does a 25-year-old English man, formerly a singer in a boy band, discover the Mexican singer, who arguably peaked in the ’70s, Juan Gabriel? 

Shame on me for underestimating El Divo de Juárez’s impact! Juan Gabriel is regarded as one of the most prolific and certainly most successful Mexican singers and composers of all time. He has sold over 100 million records worldwide, maybe one of them landed in Styles’ flat. 

This may seem like speculation at first. It almost sounds like a conspiracy theory between Juanga and Harry Styles fans. But there is so much evidence. I can guarantee that by the end of this article you will be convinced that Harry Styles is the biggest Juanga stan of all time. 

Harry Styles goes solo. 

Latino fans of both Harry Styles and the late Juanga are wondering what is going on with Harry Styles' wardrobe...did he steal it from Juan Gabriel?

You might remember Styles from a little boy band called One Direction. After earning third place on The X Factor in Britain, the band signed with Simon Cowell’s record label Syco Records. In six years, the band would release five albums and win 200 awards. Their 2014 Where We Are tour for One Direction’s third album Midnight Memories was the highest-grossing tour of all time by a vocal group. You can imagine how shocking it was when the band dissolved and entered permanent hiatus in 2015. Within two years, every member had gone solo. 

Harry Styles released his self-titled album in 2017. It debuted at number 1 in multiple countries including the United States. The record was a mix of ’70s soft rock, psychedelia, Britpop, and ballads. It’s hard to imagine why an English teen heartthrob would be identifying with so much Juanga. But there is clearly a lot more to both artists than what meets the eye. 

Juanga’s iconic style.

Juan Gabriel’s style was considered nothing short of groundbreaking during his time. His shimmery, glittery, sequins and flamboyant ensembles made the prolific artist a fashion icon. Juanga never shied away from bold colors and flashy embellishments. His vivacious manner of dressing also solidified him as an LGBTQ+ icon (along with years of speculation and rumors that he too was a member of the LGBTQ+ community). 

The influence is obvious.

It’s hard not to imagine Harry Styles opening up Google Image Search, looking at photos of Juanga, and telling his stylist, “Make me look like that!” Two men on Earth just don’t accidentally wear glittery, red leather fringe jackets. That is a niche look. It’s considerably less shocking if you understand Styles’ larger sensibilities. Styles is something of an LGBTQ+ icon himself. When asked about his sexual orientation after large fan speculation, Styles chose not to label himself. 

“No, I’ve never felt the need to really. No… I don’t feel like it’s something I’ve ever felt like I have to explain about myself,” he told The Sun

Fashion is self-expression.

Harry Styles said experimenting with fashion allowed him to find himself and feel more comfortable as a person. 

“I love the clothes,” Styles told Dazed and Confused. “That helps a lot. Just going on stage in a nuts suit with a bunch of sequins makes you feel good, and then you want to play.” 

However, when mentioning his influences Juan Gabriel was sorely missing. 

“I was realizing [dressing up] was a part of the show, if you will. Especially when performing. So, I think [for] the people I have always admired and looked up to in music, clothes have always been a big part of the thing. Like Bowie, Elvis Presley. It’s always been part of the thing.”

Masculine and Feminine

Part of both Juanga and Styles’ appeal is how they don’t fit into typical male stereotypes. They are more colorful, more playful, and more soft in the best way. 

“I think there’s so much masculinity in being vulnerable and allowing yourself to be feminine, and I’m very comfortable with that. Growing up you don’t even know what those things mean. You have this idea of what being masculine is and as you grow up and experience more of the world, you become more comfortable with who you are,” Styles told i-D

Is this just a conspiracy? 

When Harry Styles performed in Mexico City last year, he played one of Juan Gabriel’s biggest hits “Querida.” While we may never know if Harry Styles is as big a Juanga fan as he appears, I can certainly speculate that El Divo de Juárez is shading Styles from heaven because there is no doubt Mr. Styles stole his look.