Entertainment

Fake Weddings are Becoming the Hottest Parties for Singles in Argentina

Everyone likes weddings, right? You get to throw on some fancy clothes, eat free food, hit the open bar and dance the night away. What happens when you’ve got an itch to party at a wedding but haven’t received any invites? Argentina has got it all figured out: you and your friends BUY TICKETS to a wedding. Seriously.

It’s called a Falsa Boda.

Pasa en la vida! Pasa en una @falsaboda. Muy pronto todo el material de la 5ta edición!

A video posted by FALSABODA (@falsaboda) on

Credit: @falsaboda / Instagram

And it’s got everything you’d expect at a wedding.

There’s a happy couple exchanging vows…

11755268_604233906346507_2358868396240082748_n
Credit: Falsa Boda / Facebook

Live music and an open bar…

10996626_10203716926594523_4778436748085746092_n
Photo Credit: Falsa Boda / Facebook

A cute wedding cake…

#FalsaBoda5 la torta de Romina Connell !!!

A photo posted by FALSABODA (@falsaboda) on

A DJ moving the crowd…

11178293_10203716941354892_4052890788221298204_n
Credit: Falsa Boda / Facebook

A table with gifts…

11156280_10203716922274415_4083272872420710831_n
Photo Credit: Ramiro Hernan / Facebook

But there’s no family and friends. Because the attendees are all strangers.

??????? #falsaboda

A photo posted by Enjoy Life (@danielagallardi) on

The happy couple? They’re actors.

11698708_604250736344824_3378988000755738884_n
Credit: Falsa Boda / Facebook

Wait…

giphy-1
Credit: ABC / Tumblr

Yes. Young people are buying tickets to party together at a fake wedding.

Asi comienza una @falsaboda

A photo posted by FALSABODA (@falsaboda) on

Credit: @falsaboda / Instagram

It’s the brainchild of Martín Acerbi, who launched the Falsa Boda parties with a group of friends. Acerbi told BBC Mundo: “My friends love to organize parties and go out. One day at dinner we realized that we’d never party together at a wedding unless one of us got married… which isn’t really a possibility right now.”

A ticket runs you between $43 and $65. And the weddings are POPULAR.

11755460_604249509678280_6751168422195547006_n
Photo Credit: Falsa Boda / Facebook

Sound pricey? The organizers of Falsa Boda – who’ve thrown five “weddings” so far – argue it’s not much different from what someone would spend on dinner and drinks at a nightclub.

And people actually have pretty good reasons for spending their cash on a fake wedding.

#falsaboda #previa #noche#elegancia

A photo posted by Lucas Calosso (@lucascalosso) on

For some, it’s got all the positives of a wedding and none of the negatives.

#FalsaBoda con la mas linda ❤

A photo posted by Caro De Rosa (@caro.derosa) on

Would you spend your money on a staged wedding? Share on Facebook and let us know!

Argentina’s Women’s Soccer League Could Have A Trans Player And We Can’t Celebrate Enough

Entertainment

Argentina’s Women’s Soccer League Could Have A Trans Player And We Can’t Celebrate Enough

@Limaype / Twitter

It is no secret that the glass ceiling is an ever-present reality for women in all sorts of environments: in industry, entertainment and of course in professional sports. Sports is a male-centric environment and when it comes to professional leagues, womens’ teams and sports figures are seen as secondary to their hombre counterparts. Now, it is a fact that women are placed at a disadvantage when it comes to salaries and sponsorships in sports, but there is a particular group within the female population that is particularly vulnerable: trans women. Even public figures such as Hillary Clinton and J.K Rowling, who have championed women’s issues, have made unfortunate comments that can be judged as transphobic. The world is still dominated by CIS discourses and trans rights have a long way to go. 

Trans women suffer discrimination and lack of opportunities and any move forward is a significant win. That is why news coming out of Argentina give us hope in a more equal and inclusive future. The country could soon have its first trans woman professional soccer player, subject to the approval by the league. 

Mara Gomez would become the first trans woman to play in Argentina’s female soccer league.

Mara is now 22-years-old and, if approved by the AFA, the reigning body in Argentinian soccer, she will play for for Villa San Carlos, a lower-tier team in Argentina’s top league. Even if her team has not been particularly successful on the field, they have certainly triumphed in terms of their progressive politics.

When she was 15 she was figuring out her gender and sexuality, she felt bullied and alone. Until she kicked a ball and everything changed. As she revealed in Politica y Gestion, she wasn’t particularly good when she started playing but the joy for the game and perseverance helped her cross the line: “I was really bad, but I realized that it was helping me. I could escape a lot of things and it calmed my mind. Fútbol was like therapy. I began to devote more time to it. At 18, everything changed when I began transitioning. I tried out in Toronto City and they accepted me, as I am. They opened their doors and saw me as just one more player. I ended up at a lot of other teams until I got to Malvinas, which was where I was last and we became two-time league champions.”

She fully acknowledges the physical differences she will have with other female players.

In an interview for Politica y Gestion she fully acknowledged and dealt the issue of her trans identity con la cabeza en alto: “There are lots of other players who are much stronger and faster than me and they didn’t use to be male. People talk in these terms simply because medical science split us up into male and female, but we have to consider the human capacity to adapt.” You go, girl! 

The league has to approve her contract, but things are looking up.

Villa San Carlos has officially requested an approval for Mara’s contract. As reported by CE Noticias Financieras, things are looking up for Mara and her team due to three factors that will surely influence the league’s decision: “First is the fact that the front has all the studies that prove that their testosterone levels are within the limits that set regulations to compete in the female branch of the discipline. They then rely on the implementation of the Gender Identity Law, a regulation with which Argentina pioneered the guarantee of rights and which, among other issues, establishes the obligation that trans persons be treated according to their identity self-perceived gender.

Finally, there is a case of a trans player who plays in the First B of Argentine women’s football”. If they deny Mara the right to play professionally they would certainly be involved in a PR nightmare! Fingers crossed!  However, the fact that Mara has to present a hormonal analysis in order to be approved is far from ideal. 

Millennials Are Replacing Engagement Rings With Diamonds Pierced Into Their Fingers

Things That Matter

Millennials Are Replacing Engagement Rings With Diamonds Pierced Into Their Fingers

Pixabay

The centuries-old tradition of proposing with an engagement ring is facing a new challenger. Because if Instagram is anything to go by, engagement finger piercings are now a thing. Yup, some people are now choosing to declare their eternal love for each other with a diamond piercing instead of an actual ring. Here’s how it works.

Dermal piercings are the latest trend replacing engagement rings.

Getting your ears pierced (probably in the window of Claires, with your friends surrounding you) is a rite of passage for most 13-year-olds. But this isn’t that kind of piercing. It’s called a dermal piercing or (to those in the medical profession) a transdermal implant. It’s hardcore and when done right can look pretty cool.

Also known as microdermals, anchors, dermal anchors, and single-point piercings.

They refer to any piercing that lies on a flat surface of the body – in this case, the finger – and is held in place with an ‘anchor’ that is implanted beneath the skin. Ouch. The jewelry then sits on the surface of the skin, making it look like there are gems or beads on the body.

How Does a Dermal Piercing Work?

PSA to all weak-stomached readers: skip this paragraph. First, a qualified technician will sterilize the area and then use either a dermal punch on to remove a small tube of flesh, or a needle to make an L-shaped pouch, then, using dermal forceps, an anchor with either a footed or round base is inserted into the area.

How long does a dermal piercing last?

While you might not get a choice about what type of dermal base is used, there are several variations. Some are punctured with holes so that the tissue can grow in and around the piercing while others have pivoting feet that keep the piercing in place over time – FYI this is V. important as these little accessories have a habit of migrating and rejecting over time (if this happens to you speak to your piercer STAT as a displaced piercing can be fixed as long as you act fast!).

So why are people opting for piercings?

One reason might be cost: tAccording to recent surveys, most American couples expect to spend between $1,000 and $5,000 on an engagement ring, while dermals come in at around $70.

But there are lots of potential complications.

A dermatological expert told the BBC, “If the piercing is not deep enough there is a risk of it moving, known as migration. If it is too deep the skin begins to grow over the piercing, known as embedding. Other risks include inflammation, scarring and infection – particularly if it is on the hands, as is the case with these particular piercings.” They also point out that, “Another problem with having a dermal piercing on your hand is the increased likelihood of it catching on something.”

… Let’s just take a second for that to sink in.

If the mere thought of your ring piercing catching on your clothes or hair isn’t enough to put you off, some piercing studios have said they won’t do dermal piercings on people’s fingers, for that very reason. So if you’re thinking of getting a finger piercing, keep in mind that it will hurt, it could migrate, embed itself, or get infected, and you may accidentally rip your finger skin off while putting on a sweater —all in the name of love. You have been warned.