finance

An Uber Driver Made An Immigrant’s Day After Returning His Lost Wallet With $3,000

It sounds like an episode of “What Would You Do?” You’re an Uber driver and a passenger leaves their wallet in your car. Inside, you find $3,000 in cash. That scenario is exactly what happened to Chicago-based Uber driver Jose Figueroa, who after finding a passenger’s wallet, went above and beyond to return it to the rightful owner. Figueroa’s passenger was an immigrant from the Ukraine who had literally just landed in the States. The cash was the Ukrainian man’s life savings.

Figueroa says it was tempting to see so much money, but he chose to be a hero instead. He returned to the apartment where he dropped the passenger off, spoke to the passenger’s sister and returned the wallet.

Jose drives Uber to make ends meet, though he has a degree in Business from the University of Puerto Rico. Plenty of people in his position would have kept the money and said nothing, but Jose says his Christian values and strong work ethic pointed him in the right direction. Integrity, kindness and compassion — these are the values that all Americans should strive for, whether they’re first-generation immigrants or small-handed men who own billion-dollar hotels in New York (hint, hint).

In case you’re wondering, Jose was rewarded 100 dollars for his honesty. Way to go!

uber-immigrant-main-1
Credit: ABC 7 News / YouTube

What would you do? Mitú wants to know! Leave a comment below.

Read: This Immigrant Kid In Search Of American Dream Only Sleeps 3 Hours So He Can Work And Go To School

What Cubanos Really Think Of All The Tourists Taking Over Their Beloved Cuba

Identity

What Cubanos Really Think Of All The Tourists Taking Over Their Beloved Cuba

Writer-photographer Walter Thompson-Hernández, the creator behind Blaxicans of Los Angeles, is currently in Cuba, where he is meeting, and photographing, Cubans across the island. Along the way, he’s asked Cubans, young and old alike, about their views, hopes and concerns for their country’s future.


Even as Cuba sits on the precipice of what might be yet another large scale economic and political restructuring, for many of the island’s youth–and an increasing number of foreign tourists–the revolutionary propaganda that lines the island’s streets exist only as a reminder of an era in Cuba’s history that has been canonized by popular culture. For others, however, the revolution is more than aesthetic or hallowed rhetoric. These people, well into their golden years, can still vividly recall the day their lives were directly impacted by the outset of the Cuban Revolution in 1959. Some were young children, while others were well into their early 20s when the first shots were fired on the Southern shores of Playa Girón.

All of these perspectives form the Cuban experience. Here, then, are the stories of the Cuban people — young and old — in their own words:

Pedro and Giovanny, 11

Pedro and GiovannyCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“People always get us confused for each other and our teacher says we’re the best mathematicians in our school.”

Bertha and Ignacia, 75 and 73

Bertha and Ignacia
Credit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“We’ve been friends for over 40 years. We’ve seen it all.”

Yasmani, 24

YasmaniCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I’m a writer, poet, radio dj, and cultural promoter. I am inspired by my reality and my society. I try to change the negative things that I encounter. When I started my first poetry project called “El Sendero De La Poesía,” I was told that I was crazy, but as time has passed, people saw that I wasn’t crazy. That project has united a lot of people that I love. It’s always important to change reality for the better.”

Juan, 86

JuanCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I am grateful that I have friends and family that take care of me. I go to church almost every day where they help with my laundry, give me food, and allow me to socialize with my group of friends.”

Mercedes, 32

MercedesCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I think tourists help our economy, but I don’t like to socialize with them because a lot of them come to Cuba for the wrong reasons. I think we’re going to have to find ways to become more self-sufficient in the future.”

Mari Julia, 84

Mari JuliaCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“Life can be difficult here, but we find ways to overcome a lot of the challenges that we face.”

Hector, 14

HectorCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I’m from central Havana and baseball is my favorite sport; I hope to achieve the things I want to achieve through it. I don’t know what the future looks like, but I just hope that I can keep playing baseball.”

Camita, 86

CamitaCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“Cooking allows me remember my mother and what she taught me. I don’t know what the future looks like, but I do know that I hope I can cook for as long as I live.”

Reynaldo and Ivan, 7 and 10

Reynaldo and IvanCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I’m his older brother.”

Maria Luisa, 75

Maria LuisaCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

Maria Luisa is unable to speak. She is battling Alzheimer’s.

Surisaday, 25

SurisadayCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I am from El Cobre, a small neighborhood here in Santiago de Cuba. I’m a singer and go against the grain, trying to move past a lot of the limitations that we experience here. I’m always trying to inspire young people like myself.”

Omar, 75

OmarCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I work as a watchman and look after this home every night. When I was younger I traveled to Guatemala to work for the government, but now my days are spent watching this home. I was happy that President Obama visited the island – now I want to see Cuba reach levels it’s never reached before.”

Maite, 20

MaiteCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I studied music and piano in school for many years. I also earned a lot of national awards and graduated. I realized that I wanted more than classic piano, so I began to sing when I was 11 years old. Today, I’m a singer, producer, manage several groups, and helped to bring the Manana festival to Santiago.”

Hilario, 81

HilarioCredit: Walter Thompson-Hernández

“I live in Los Angeles and I am back to visit my family. I moved to the United States in 1967 and worked in different jobs. I retired years ago and spend a lot of time with other Cubans who also left the island in L.A.”


READ: Hiiii Khloe, How’s Your Cuba Trip Going? Can We Chat About Something For A Sec?

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