Culture

America’s Favorite Imported Beer From Mexico Facing Troubled Stock Market

No matter where you come from, everyone loves a good beer.

And this is why my tíos are still single.

Posted by We are mitú on Monday, October 31, 2016

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Let’s be honest though, some get too much pleasure from it. We all have that drunkle.

Since the election, however, stock in Corona — America’s favorite Mexican beer import — has taken a nose dive faster than, well, this…

CREDIT: F / YOUTUBE

Five second rule doesn’t apply here. Or does it…

In one day of trading, Constellation Brands, Corona’s parent company, saw its shares drop from $166 to $153.

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That’s about an 8 percent decline for a company that also owns Corona Extra, Corona Light, Modelo Especial, Modelo Negra and Pacifico.

The decline is tied to investors’ fears in how trading between Mexico and the U.S. will play out in the coming months.

CREDIT: iamyourgrandmaandtotallynotawolf / IMGUR

If NAFTA, a deal partly spearheaded by George H. W. Bush and signed by Bill Clinton, is revoked, tariffs would inflate the cost of ingredients going to Mexico, as well as the cost of imported Corona in the U.S. — creating a dip in profits and scaring off potential investors.

However, Corona isn’t worried about their recent dip.

CREDIT: THE SIMPSONS / FOX

Rob Sands, CEO of Constellation Brand told investors, “I don’t expect [the election] to affect our business in the short term and as these policies develop, we will respond accordingly and engage with government accordingly.”

Whatever the future holds for Corona, one thing is always true: DRINK RESPONSIBLY.

CREDIT: DODGEBALL / FOX

READ: No Matter Who You Root For, This Goal Celebration Will Fire You Up

What’s your favorite Mexican import? mitú wants to know!

This Mexican Beer Brand Is Winning Awards For Their Can Design And What It Means For The Environment

Things That Matter

This Mexican Beer Brand Is Winning Awards For Their Can Design And What It Means For The Environment

@BrandFuel | Twitter \ Codigo Web / YouTube

Let’s be real, plastic waste is a huge problem. And it’s one that has recently taken over our collective consciousness as we try and cut back on our waste – in particular, single-use plastics. 

One of the most obvious and unnecessary plastics are those pesky rings that hold cans together. Whether you’re drinking Coke or cervezas, these plastic rings are terrible. They often end up littering landscapes all over the place and animals like turtles and birds can get them wrapped around their little necks. 

So, the news from Mexican-beer company, Grupo Modelo, that they’re working to replace this plastic, is huge. 

Credit: @BrandFuel / Twitter

The beer world had one of the earliest plastic problems: six-pack rings. Getting rid of these rings became a big concern when word got out that they could entangle marine life. And yet, here we are, decades later, and – despite some interesting efforts like sticking cans together with glue or rings that are actually edible – the six-pack ring problem still hasn’t been definitively solved.

But thankfully, Corona is working towards a couple of solutions.

Credit: @nypost / Twitter

So how does it work? According to Mexico News Daily, the top of each can screws into the bottom of another, creating an interlocking tower up to 10 cans high. The format makes the product even more portable than before, meaning you don’t even really need a plastic bag to carry it. 

Of course, stacking cans end-to-end isn’t always ideal. Ten standard cans stacked on top of each other would be four feet tall. That’s far more conspicuous and unwieldy than holding a couple of six-packs under your arms. But at the same time, since these Fit Pack cans can be twisted apart and put back together at will, they provide an advantage six-packs don’t: You can stick together as many or as few cans as you want at any given time.

The plastic-free packaging concept, dubbed the Fit Pack, made the shortlist of the Innovation category at the Cannes Lions international awards show this year.

In a promotional video for the new cans, Carlos Ranero, Marketing VP for AB 1nBev, says, “In the beverage industry, there have been many solutions for cutting back the use of plastic; however, none has been fully adopted because they require the use of other materials. This solution has a very simple approach that can bring great financial benefits thanks to the complete removal of plastic materials in packaging.”

Fit Packs are currently being tested in Mexico only, but the company is planning for a wider rollout in the future.

Not only is the company testing out stackable beer cans, they’ve also been testing out biodegradable rings in Tulum, Mexico – obviously a major beer mecca.

Last year, the company also tested six-pack rings made from plant-based biodegradable fibers with a mix of byproduct waste and compostable materials. These were designed to break down into organic matter that won’t hurt wildlife. The plastic-free rings were first launched in Tulum, Mexico, with plans to expand at a later time. For the sake of Mother Earth, we’re hoping these products earn a spot on grocery store shelves.

Beer drinking Twitter was totally here for the news.

Credit: @power97wpg

Anything that makes drinking beer easier and better for the environment, yes please!

Others were already thinking of how much fun this could be…

Credit: @larrykim / Twitter

Like, let’s be real, you were totally thinking the same thing.

And many were glad we may no longer have to hear about the horrors of plastic waste.

Like all too often you turn on the news and hear about animals being stuck, caught, wrapped up in plastic rings. Many even suffocate.

While at least on Twitter user thought about the implications for beer can furniture…

Credit: @larrykim

Because why not?!

And for the one person on Twitter who had their doubts…Twitter was ready with the truth.

Credit: @power97wpg / Twitter

Like for real though, I don’t know where you live that you thought you carry 24 cans of beer with plastic rings…

The Makers Of Corona Beer Are Spending Billions To Get Into The Weed Industry

Culture

The Makers Of Corona Beer Are Spending Billions To Get Into The Weed Industry

Grupo Modelo — the company that once owned Corona — has come a long way since they first began to brew beer in 1922. Its Mexican founders sold the rights to Corona to Anheuser-Busch InBev in 2008 in a $20.1 billion deal, and now the Corona is expanding even further.

Corona’s parent company — Constellation Brands — is spending $3.8 billion and investing it in a Canadian weed producer named Canopy Growth.

According to Bloomberg, it’s the largest investment into a weed producer ever. And while some may think it’s a weird idea for a beer brand to be associated with weed, some say this merger is only a sign of good things to come for both industries.

“I think a lot of people are quick to knee jerk this as bad,” Cannabis Now Magazine CEO and publisher Eugenio Garcia told Forbes. “But it is giving a cannabis company access to hundreds of millions [or even billions] of dollars in working capital from which they can make light years faster expressions than any other competitors.”

As more states make weed legal, beer companies are investing in its producers in order to be able to include weed as an ingredient in beer.

CNBC reports that some beers already have weed as ingredient, including Heineken and Molson Coors whom already sell “cannabis-infused drinks.”

“Heineken’s Lagunitas brand has started selling nonalcoholic sparkling water featuring THC, the active component of marijuana. And Molson Coors has formed a joint venture with Hydropothecary, a weed producer, to make cannabis-infused beverages,” CNBC reports.

But just because this billion dollar deal speaks volumes of the growth of the weed industry doesn’t mean that smaller companies won’t be doing the same.

“You’re going to see more of this smaller business model,” Garcia told Forbes. “Much like in the agricultural, farm to table movement around the U.S people will start producing cannabis legally for their immediate geographic locations. You go to any city in the U.S. and you’re going to find a microbrewer that is only putting out enough quantity to support a couple thousand people in their neighborhood. People love that. And that’s going to be very similar, I believe, with cannabis.”

Here’s what people on social media are saying about the beer/weed partnership.

So maybe we won’t notice the difference in taste?

Maybe weed will improve the flavor of Corona?

Corona isn’t the best beer out there, but does it really taste like water?

This guy already has a slogan for the new product.

Not sure if the word “skunky” is gonna sell this drink.

Maybe Bud should have invested in weed….

What a waste of an opportunity. If you’re reading this Bud owners, it’s not too late.

READ:  Here Are The 11 Stages People Who Can’t Handle Weed Go Through When They Get High

Do you think you’d try beer with weed as ingredient? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below!