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America Ferrera Almost Quit Acting. Here’s Why

In a recent interview with The Frame’s John Horn, America Ferrera opened up about the struggles she’s faced to combine her love of acting with her passion for activism. These days, America has been definitely been able to spread awareness on a variety of issues, but getting to this point took years of soul-soul searching. America explains the professional and personal evolution she went through to get to where she is today. Here are a few quotes from that 13-minute interview, but I urge you to check out the entire interview via The Frame. It’s definitely a great listening experience for anyone facing a similar situation.

On her early career.

CREDIT: AMERICAFERRERA / INSTAGRAM

“When I was 16 years old, auditioning for jobs, I wasn’t thinking about representing anyone. I was thinking about, you know, getting a job, and getting to do what I loved to do.”

On how “Real Women Have Curves” influenced her.

CREDIT: REAL WOMEN HAVE CURVES / NEWMARKET FILMS

“With the first film I ever did, “Real Women Have Curves”, I just noticed that it was an opportunity to represent people, and to create representations that don’t exist out there. And so that very quickly became part of the math for me.”

On how she’s using her producer role to create opportunities.

Almost out the door! #cfdaawards @cfda @katespadeny @ireneneuwirth @karlawelchstylist @shoandco #livecolorfully

A photo posted by America Ferrera (@americaferrera) on

CREDIT: AMERICAFERRERA / INSTAGRAM

“I think who I am as a person, and who I am as a storyteller, I very much take that into consideration. And especially now as a producer, somebody who’s out there, y’know, trying to enable certain stories to come through, I’m absolutely thinking about all those things. How do I create more accurate, more authentic representations of people who don’t get to be seen.”

On those who paved the way for her career.

CREDIT: AMERICA FERRERA / INSTAGRAM

“I happened to be in the right place at the right time to play Anna in “Real Women Have Curves” or Betty Suarez in “Ugly Betty.” I realized how fortunate I am and who had to come before me and play 200 maids so that I could step in and play “Ugly Betty” on broadcast television. And I do think that there is so much work that needs to be done.

On how she combines activism and entertainment.

CREDIT: AMERICA FERRERA / INSTAGRAM

“I think it’s the artist’s role to reflect the world we live in, to represent people and stories and voices […] it is the role of the artist to push culture and society forward, to push us towards progress, and not just merely reflect what we see in some sort of neutral way, if neutral is even possible in this day and age.”

[HT] America Ferrera nearly quit acting to be an activist — now she does both


READ: 7 Great America Ferrera Clapbacks Of 2016

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Netflix Is Turning “I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter” Into A Movie With America Ferrera As Director

Entertainment

Netflix Is Turning “I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter” Into A Movie With America Ferrera As Director

Netflix has been churning out tons of content over the past year, giving us many of our favorite binge worthy shows of the pandemic. From Tiger King and Selena: The Series to The Queen’s Gambit and Bridgerton, we’ve all been spending a lot more time with the TV screen thanks to Netflix.

Well, now, we’ll all have yet another reason to spend just a little more time in front of the screen thanks to an upcoming project Netflix is working on alongside Ugly Betty’s America Ferrera. The team are turning the iconic novel I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter into a movie with Ferrera in the director’s chair. And she’ll be bringing some of her crew from Gentefied. This is a mashup we can’t wait to see!

America Ferrera will step into the director’s chair for a Netflix project.

Emmy and Golden Globe winner America Ferrera is set to make her feature directorial debut with an adaptation of the New York Times bestselling novel, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by author Erika Sánchez, who will serve as a co-producer on the film.

“Years ago, I fell in love with Erika L. Sánchez’ stunning novel, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter,” said Ferrera. “The depth, wit and searing intelligence of her writing, and her young Latina heroine, struck me to my core and left me wanting so much more. I am truly honored and humbled to direct Linda Yvette Chávez’s beautifully adapted screenplay. The opportunity to direct the work of these two incredibly talented Latina writers is a dream come true. I can’t wait to share this film with the many fans of the novel, and to introduce this funny, profound, and resonant story to the world.”

It’s America Ferrera’s first time directing a feature film but she is no stranger to being a director for TV, having helmed episodes of the hit series Superstore before.

Released in 2017, the story follows Julia Reyes, a first-generation American-Mexican.

Released in 2017, the story follows Julia Reyes, the precocious and strong-willed teenaged daughter of first-generation Mexican immigrants. She often clashes with her more traditional parents, who wish she were more like her sister Olga, the platonic ideal of a Mexican daughter. However, when Olga is killed in a tragic accident, it is up to Julia to hold her family together.

She’ll also be working alongside fellow crew from Gentefied.

Not only is the project featuring the novel’s author, Erika Sanchez, as a co-producer but the film’s screenplay was adapted by Linda Yvette Chavez –the co-creator behind the Netflix series, Gentefied. It’s so incredible to see a powerful, female-driven team leading up such an important project.

Although Netflix has not yet revealed details about the cast, crew, or release date, America’s fans are excitedly awaiting her new project.

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How Latino Organizers in Arizona Helped Flip the State From Red to Blue

Entertainment

How Latino Organizers in Arizona Helped Flip the State From Red to Blue

Photo by Ted Soqui/Corbis via Getty Images

When Arizona was officially called for Joe Biden this year, a number of think pieces appeared on the internet that assigned the responsibility of Biden’s win to white Republicans. Headlines ran calling the victory “John McCain’s Revenge”–a reference to the late Arizona senator who had a contentious relationship with Donald Trump. Pundits hypothesized that white Republican voters cast their vote for Biden to spite Donald Trump, who had previously insulted the beloved Arizona Senator’s military record.

Soon after this narrative began to trend, Latinos quickly took to social media to set the record straight. “Hey @CNN,” wrote Julio Ricardo Varela on Twitter. “@CindyMcCain is not the only reason that Biden won Arizona. It wasn’t just that. Can you at least discuss the overwhelming Latino support and the organizing history of young Latinos in the time of SB1070?”

In the noise of election pontificating, the media largely ignored the efforts of Latino grassroots organizers. The efforts that ultimately helped flip Arizona. It is not a coincidence that Latinos now constitute the base of the Democratic party in Arizona.

It was no coincidence that so many Latinos mobilized this year. In fact, the event was a deliberate and organized process spearheaded by activist groups like the MiAZ coalition. The MiAZ coalition is a five activist groups that organized a massive field campaign targeting Latino voters. Altogether, Mi AZ reports that they made nearly 8 million calls and knocked on over 1.15 million doors.

Mi AZ reports Latino voter turnout in Arizona was at an all-time high of 50% this year, up from the record of 44% in 2016. The organization also reported to local news website AZ Central that according to their data analysis, “nearly 73% of Latino voters in key Latino-majority precincts in Arizona chose President-elect Joe Biden” over President Trump.

In an in-depth and touching Twitter thread, Arizona-based educator and organizer Reyna Montoya wrote a briefer on what changed Arizona from blue to red “for folks who may be wondering what is going on.”

In the thread, Montoya described her first-hand account of the trauma that Latinos in Arizona faced through the last few decades. A collective trauma that ended up mobilizing the Latino community for Biden.

Montoya described Arizona’s “English Only” law that passed in 2000. She then described Prop 300 in 2006, a measure that forbid students from receiving state financial aid for college if they couldn’t prove they were legal residents of Arizona. The final event was what most personally affected her: the passage of SB1070, a law that required all immigrants over the age of 18 to carry immigration documentation with them at all times.

“This was personal,” Montoya wrote on Twitter. “I remember my mom being scared. I remember being extreme cautions about driving anywhere.”

It was Arizona’s anti-Latino sentiment and, consequently, the legislation the state government passed to curb the rights of Latinos in the state that ended up backfiring. Instead of suppressing a community, the anti-Latino legislation ended up lighting a fire under many young Latinos, prompting them to organize. To fight back.

“In 2011, we decided to organize, build community and focus on rebuilding Arizona.,” Montoya wrote so brilliantly on Twitter. “Since 2011 until now, we have been educating others on immigration.”

“We have decided to no longer remain in the shadows,” she said. “We decided to let our voices be heard.”

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