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A Virus in Latin America is having a Serious Effect on Unborn Babies

A virus, which has serious effects on pregnant women, is spreading throughout Latin America and the Caribbean Islands. While the virus is not fatal to pregnant women, unborn children are developing birth defects and, in some cases, dying right after birth or in the womb.

The Zika virus is causing chaos for pregnant women in Latin America, especially Brazil.

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The virus, like dengue fever, is transmitted by mosquitos, not person-to-person contact.

The Zika virus is a nightmare for unborn babies. If a pregnant woman is infected with Zika, her fetus may develop microcephaly.

Microcephaly is a condition which causes incomplete brain growth in the womb.

Children born with microcephaly have one thing in common: their heads are smaller than healthy children.

Credit: @antispetic_shemite / Instagram

The Washington Post reported that 29 babies in Brazil died from the microcephaly in 2015. Autopsies performed on some of the babies proved the link of the Zika virus and microcephaly.

The first transmission case in Puerto Rico was reported in December 2015, bringing the virus closer to the US and proving that it can spread.

The first case of a child born with the microcephaly in the US was reported in Hawaii this week.

There have been no local transmissions of the virus in Hawaii or the US, but experts are mindful of the warmer months in tropical areas like Florida and Hawaii.

The fast spread of the virus led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to issue travel alerts to all people traveling to Mexico, South America, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands.

Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The travel alerts are at level 2 out of 3, urging travelers to take extra precaution when visiting any of the affected countries.

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Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

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Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Pokémon fans in Latin America are mourning the death of Diana Pérez, the Spanish-language voice of Jessie of Pokémon’s Team Rocket. The voice actress has been voicing the character since 1997.

Diana Pérez, the voice actress of Team Rocket’s Jessie, died at 51.

Lalo Garza, a famed voice actor in Mexico, confirmed the death of the Pokémon voice actress.

“Rest in peace Diana Pérez, a strong, cultured, intelligent, and very talented woman. You are good now, friend. Nothing hurts anymore. Have a good trip,” reads the tweet.

Pérez has been a staple in the Spanish-language Pokémon fandom for decades.

Pérez was more than just he voice of Jessie. The voice actress was the voice of multiple anime characters including Luffy in One Piece and Kagura in Inuyasha. In recent years, Pérez had started branching out to directing, producing, and other branches in the entertainment industry.

Pérez’s death is being mourned by Pokémon fans outside of the Spanish-language fandom.

Sarah Natochenny is the English voice of Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon series, Jessie’s mortal enemy. The death of Pérez has impacted the larger Pokémon community. Pérez was a pivotal part of the Latin American Pokémon community for decades and her loss has devastated fans.

Descansa en paz, Diana.

There have been no plans announced for a replacement to voice Team Rocket’s Jessie. No official cause of death has been released either. Our hearts and thoughts go out to Pérez’s family and the greater Pokémon community mourning her passing.

READ: I Was Today Years Old When I Found Out This Mexican Pokémon

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The Last Wild Macaw In Rio de Janeiro Visits the Zoo Everyday Because She’s Lonely

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The Last Wild Macaw In Rio de Janeiro Visits the Zoo Everyday Because She’s Lonely

via Getty Images

If you’re the type of person who constantly complains about being single, this story will most definitely resonate with you. In Rio de Janeiro, there is a macaw that experts believe is the only free macaw currently living in Rio. To make things more tragic, this Brazilian macaw is so lonely that she makes daily visits to her fellow macaws at Rio de Janeiro’s zoo.

Every morning, a blue-and-yellow macaw (affectionately named Juliet) flies into the enclosure where the zoo’s macaw lives and canoodles with her fellow species.

According to the staff of the Rio de Janeiro Zoo, Juliet has been making daily visits to the enclosure for 20 years. The last time a blue-and-yellow macaw like Juliet was seen in the wild was in 1818. So it’s safe to say she’s fiending for some company. The average lifespan of a macaw is 35-years, which means Juliet has spent the majority of her life as a single lady.

“They’re social birds, and that means they don’t like to live alone, whether in nature or captivity. They need company,” said Neiva Guedes, president of the Hyacinth Macaw Institute, to the Associated Press. “[Juliet] very probably feels lonely, and for that reason goes to the enclosure to communicate and interact.”

Luckily for Juliet, the Rio de Janeiro Zoo is launching a program called Refauna that is aiming to breed and reintroduce blue-and-yellow macaws back into the wild.

The Refauna program plans to breed 20 macaw chicks and give them “training” on “forest food sources, the peril of predators and avoidance of power lines.” Once they’re thoroughly educated, workers will release the birds into the Tijuca Forest National Park to live full, free lives. Some people are hoping that with so many macaws flying free out in the open, Juliet will feel less lonely.

But some animal experts are warning the general public not to feel too bad for Juliet. “We don’t want to project human feelings,” biologist Angelita Capobianco told AP News. I look at the animal, and see an animal at ease.” That’s nice to hear. We love a strong, independent woman who doesn’t need a man to thrive.

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