Things That Matter

A Police Chief In Mexico Hired Female Police Officers Based On How Attractive They Were

Welcome to Querétaro City, Mexico!

Bienvenidos @ #Queretaro ! #travel #visitingtheworld #travelgram #mexico #summertime #workhardstayhumble

A photo posted by Florin (@iliesflorin) on

Credit: @iliesflorin / Instagram

Nestled away in the state of Querétaro, this Mexican tourist town is home to beautiful landmarks, like its aqueducts…

#querétaro #vscocam

A photo posted by Sergio Ortiz (@jejou) on

Credit: @jejou / Instagram

And old, historic streets filled with shops, restaurants and hotels.

Querétaro ? #instaphoto #enjoy #myart #journey #incredibleday #exploring #instasize

A photo posted by David Martínez (@deivid_live) on

Credit: @deivid_live / Instagram

But there is a dirty little secret that just got blown wide open.

You’ll also find a developing scandal surrounding the local police chief, who created a women-only police unit that he hired based on physical appearance.

Credit: @NYMag / Twitter

That’s right. Police chief Rolando Eugenio Hidalgo Eddy is accused of making young female police-force applicants to undergo “attractiveness tests.” Querétaro police have denied creating the new female-only unit. But this isn’t the first time the police chief has found himself in trouble, and for the same reason.

Rolando Eugenio Hidalgo Eddy was the law enforcement official behind a similar police unit in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Women wore high-heeled boots and leggings as part of the official uniform.

Credit: @globalissuesweb / Twitter

The women-only police force in Aguascalientes was disbanded in 2013 after being deemed less effective on crime. Its sole purpose was for women to be in charge of policing tourists.

The practice of hiring “pretty” girls for a tourist police force is already in use in some parts of Mexico, including Acapulco.

Credit: @MailOnline / Twitter

But the female police officers in Querétaro City were not having it. Two female officers filed complaints in response to the so-called attractiveness tests, which consisted of male officers critiquing female officers about their looks and weight while in uniform. According to The Guardian, one male officer told a female officer she was “pauchy” after being pregnant and losing her baby.

“For the first time in my job, I felt humiliated, sad and disappointed,” one female police officer said, according to documents obtained by an advocacy group called Coincidir Mujeres.

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Credit: Coincidir  Mujeres / Facebook

“The women said, ‘I trained to be a police officer, not a showgirl,’” Maricruz Ocampo, of Coincidir Mujeres, told The Guardian.

Several people in Mexico, including security analyst Jorge Kawas of Monterrey, are speaking out against hiring female police officers based on appearance. Kawas told The Guardian that the hiring practices of Hidalgo Eddy are not only discriminatory, but that there isn’t evidence that it actually works.

You can read the full document below.

Les compartimos el testimonio de una mujer policía de Querétaro:
“Como ganado, pasamos por varios escrutinios, primero…

Posted by Coincidir Mujeres on Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Credit: Coincidir Mujeres / Facebook

(H/T: The Guardian)

READ: F* Your Machismo, These Women Take Back Womanhood

Share this story with your friends by tapping that share button below and let your friends know you stand with the female police officers of Querétaro City, Mexico!

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

Things That Matter

Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

JiromyXool / Facebook

Few days are as important or as celebrated as a teenager’s 15th birthday. So imagine the level of selflessness one must have to be able to say ‘no, I don’t want any of the celebration, I rather help out my community.’

Well, one teen in Merida, Mexico did just that this week when she told her family ‘thanks, but no thanks’ to her big quince and instead used the money that had been raised for her special day to help out her neighbors who have been impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic.

Her party was canceled thanks to Coronavirus, so she decided to help out those less fortunate.

In many countries across Latin America, the quinceañera is a huge milestone for teenagers. Beautiful dresses, visits from the entire family, big parties, and the best gifts are the norm at most quinces. But for 15-year-old Jiromy Xool Pech, instead of spending money on a lavish birthday celebration, she opted to use her party funds to help feed the needy.

Jiromy and her family had long planned her quinceañera – she had been looking forward to it for years. But with the pandemic hitting her community in Mérida particularly hard, the teen decided to put the party aside and use everything that had been invested in the ceremony to help her neighbors who have been impacted by the pandemic.

“Instead of partying, I prefer to give food to people, to help them with that,” Jiromy told El Universal. Jiromy not only asked to donate the money for her quince to the community, but she was also out there helping distribute the food to her neighbors.

Jiromy and her family weren’t alone in helping out the community either. Much of the food that was given out was prepared from by neighbors and local businesses that came to join Jiromy’s cause once word began to spread.

Unfortunately, many quinceañeras have been canceled or postponed thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Credit: Diego Sanchez / Getty Images

One of Mexico City’s most famous markets for buying quince dresses – el Mercado Lagunilla – has been closed for three months. This ins’t just hating a major impact on dressmakers and salespeople, but it also means that young teens aren’t able to buy the dresses to celebrate their big day.

But not all is completely lost: there are those who have begun to return, like Ximena González, who came with her family to try on dresses. Her quince was scheduled for May 16, but the pandemic changed everything, and now they expect it to take place in November.

“I was scared and upset but I had to accept it. Some friends can no longer go because they are moving,” she told El Universal. She added, “I hope that when it is my party the infections have gone down and that everything is done as if nothing had happened.”

Mexico has been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, including Jiromy’s hometown of Merida.

Jiromy’s selfless act to help her community comes as Mexico continues to see record breaking numbers of cases. Tens of thousands are dying and even more are losing their jobs and being forced back into poverty.

As of August 6, Mexico has more than 456,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 49,698 people have died from the virus. In Jiromy’s state of Yucatan, there have been more than 10,000 cases of the virus and it’s had a huge impact on tourism, which is a major economic force in the state. Therefore, it makes sense that the 15-year-old thought it was important to use the money raised for her party to help those who are suffering financially.

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