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A Bunch of Dudes from Texas Decided to Mix Norteño with Punk Rock

Meet the boys from San Antonio band Piñata Protest:

https://instagram.com/p/0d2-49vEdm/

They’re a band that describes themselves as a bordertown mash-up of The Ramones…

And Ramon Ayala.

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Sounds like they nailed it:

Credit: mitu / YouTube

So where’d they get the idea to mix punk rock with Norteñas? From lead singer Alvaro Del Norte.

https://instagram.com/p/jCf76bvEcO/

Del Norte, who was raised in a conservative Catholic family, fell in love with Nirvana as a teen.

Credit: Sam / Geffen / YouTube

He says his “cool Uncle” passed him a copy of Nirvana’s Incesticde, which sparked his interest in rock music.

Del Norte also grew up listening to Norteñas – but he says he wasn’t a fan. He was a punk rocker through and through.

But Del Norte says that as he grew older, he wanted to get back to his roots.

Del Norte decided to combine his love of punk rock and his newfound appreciation for Norteñas. So he learned to play accordion and started Piñata Protest.

With songs like “Campesino,” the band combines the social commentary of punk and the get-your-ass-up-and-dance vibe of Norteñas.

Go to one of their shows, and you’ll find yourself listening to intense two-minute punk songs…

Credit: pinataprotest / YouTube

And covers of classic tracks like “Volver, Volver.”

Credit: Roxie Nicole / YouTube

And sometimes – just so you don’t forget it’s rock ‘n roll – a smashed accordion.

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Texas High Schoolers Conducted a Mock ‘Slave Auction’ Of Black Students Over Snapchat

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Texas High Schoolers Conducted a Mock ‘Slave Auction’ Of Black Students Over Snapchat

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Students at a high school in Aledo, Texas are being disciplined after the administration discovered they held a mock slave auction on Snapchat where they “traded” Black students.

Screenshots of the Snapchat group show that these unnamed students “bid” on students of color, ranging anywhere from $1 to $100.

One student in particular was priced at $1 because his hair was “bad”. The screenshot also shows that the group chat’s name changed regularly. The group’s name started as “Slave Trade” then changed to “N—-r Farm”, and finally to “N—– Auction”.

Upon learning of the mock slave auction, the Daniel Ninth Grade Campus’s principal wrote a note to parents explaining the situation. Principal Carolyn Ansley called the mock slave auction “an incident of cyberbullying and harassment” which “led to conversations about how inappropriate and hurtful language can have a profound and lasting impact” on people.

Many people felt that the school principal downplayed the gravity of the mock slave auction. Not once did she mention the word racism in the letter that she sent out to parents.

“Calling it cyberbullying rather than calling it racism… that is the piece that really gets under my skin,” said Mark Grubbs, father to three former Aledo ISD students, to NBC DFW. But Grubbs, along with many other Aledo parents and community members, say that the incident didn’t surprise them.

In fact, Grubbs said he had to take his children out of the Aledo ISD school system because of how much racist harassment his children were facing. “A lot of racism,” he said of his son’s experience at the school. “My son being called out of his name and what not and it got to the point he didn’t mind fighting and that didn’t sit right with me and my wife. My son was never a fighter.”

After the backlash to the initial statement, Superintendent Susan Bohn finally released a statement condemning the racism and “hatred” of the mock slave auction.

“There is no room for racism or hatred in the Aledo ISD, period,’ Bohn wrote. “Using inappropriate, offensive and racially charged language and conduct is completely unacceptable and is prohibited by district policy.”

The problem with “policies” like these is they fail to target the issue of racism at the root. Hate speech may be “prohibited”, but if a child is displaying racist behavior for whatever reason, the bigger problem is the way that they have been educated and indoctrinated. Slave auctions have no place in 2021.

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Bolero Meets The Modern Club in Los Rivera Destino’s New Single “Castigo” with Pedro Capó

Latidomusic

Bolero Meets The Modern Club in Los Rivera Destino’s New Single “Castigo” with Pedro Capó

Puerto Rican band Los Rivera Destino are back with their new single “Castigo” featuring Pedro Capó. The song is the first single from their long awaited album which is due to be released this summer.

Castigo” is the best of both worlds: fusing Bolero and Dembow, creating a fresh take on songs we would listen to at the club.

We had the chance to interview Los Rivera Destino for Latido Music by mitú, and they talked about filming the music video, songs that they would like to see with Bolero covers, working with Bad Bunny again, and more.

Check out our interview below:

Watch the music video below:

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