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A 12-Year-Old Mexican Boy Hilariously Trolled Anti-Vaxxers In This Viral Video

Vaccines DO cause autism.

Posted by Marco Arturo on Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Credit: Marco Arturo / Facebook

This little Mexican genius just adorably destroyed the anti-vaxxer argument.

Marco Arturo has set the Internet on FIRE. This 12-year-old Mexican genius went full savage on people who legit think that vaccines lead to autism. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has already stressed that vaccines don’t cause autism, but that’s not enough for the anti-vaccine truthers. So young Marco stepped in to further drive this point home.

You might say, “But it’s my child so I should have the right to choose what happens to my child.” Marco agrees with you on that 100 percent.

“OK. I agree,” he says. “It’s your choice if you are going to expose your child to deadly diseases, but, you know, it’s not just your child. It’s basically everyone else’s child. It’s also everyone else’s child you are putting in danger because you read some forwarded email.” [insert dripping sarcasm]


Marco said it best at the end his video:

EpicMicDrop
Credit: Marco Arturo / Facebook

The video has already been viewed 6.9 million times. If that’s not a mic drop, we don’t know what is.


READ: Cuba Has A Drug That The U.S. Really Needs

How many anti-vaxxers do you know? Share this story with all your friends by tapping that share button below and find out!

This Mexican Beer Brand Is Winning Awards For Their Can Design And What It Means For The Environment

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This Mexican Beer Brand Is Winning Awards For Their Can Design And What It Means For The Environment

@BrandFuel | Twitter \ Codigo Web / YouTube

Let’s be real, plastic waste is a huge problem. And it’s one that has recently taken over our collective consciousness as we try and cut back on our waste – in particular, single-use plastics. 

One of the most obvious and unnecessary plastics are those pesky rings that hold cans together. Whether you’re drinking Coke or cervezas, these plastic rings are terrible. They often end up littering landscapes all over the place and animals like turtles and birds can get them wrapped around their little necks. 

So, the news from Mexican-beer company, Grupo Modelo, that they’re working to replace this plastic, is huge. 

Credit: @BrandFuel / Twitter

The beer world had one of the earliest plastic problems: six-pack rings. Getting rid of these rings became a big concern when word got out that they could entangle marine life. And yet, here we are, decades later, and – despite some interesting efforts like sticking cans together with glue or rings that are actually edible – the six-pack ring problem still hasn’t been definitively solved.

But thankfully, Corona is working towards a couple of solutions.

Credit: @nypost / Twitter

So how does it work? According to Mexico News Daily, the top of each can screws into the bottom of another, creating an interlocking tower up to 10 cans high. The format makes the product even more portable than before, meaning you don’t even really need a plastic bag to carry it. 

Of course, stacking cans end-to-end isn’t always ideal. Ten standard cans stacked on top of each other would be four feet tall. That’s far more conspicuous and unwieldy than holding a couple of six-packs under your arms. But at the same time, since these Fit Pack cans can be twisted apart and put back together at will, they provide an advantage six-packs don’t: You can stick together as many or as few cans as you want at any given time.

The plastic-free packaging concept, dubbed the Fit Pack, made the shortlist of the Innovation category at the Cannes Lions international awards show this year.

In a promotional video for the new cans, Carlos Ranero, Marketing VP for AB 1nBev, says, “In the beverage industry, there have been many solutions for cutting back the use of plastic; however, none has been fully adopted because they require the use of other materials. This solution has a very simple approach that can bring great financial benefits thanks to the complete removal of plastic materials in packaging.”

Fit Packs are currently being tested in Mexico only, but the company is planning for a wider rollout in the future.

Not only is the company testing out stackable beer cans, they’ve also been testing out biodegradable rings in Tulum, Mexico – obviously a major beer mecca.

Last year, the company also tested six-pack rings made from plant-based biodegradable fibers with a mix of byproduct waste and compostable materials. These were designed to break down into organic matter that won’t hurt wildlife. The plastic-free rings were first launched in Tulum, Mexico, with plans to expand at a later time. For the sake of Mother Earth, we’re hoping these products earn a spot on grocery store shelves.

Beer drinking Twitter was totally here for the news.

Credit: @power97wpg

Anything that makes drinking beer easier and better for the environment, yes please!

Others were already thinking of how much fun this could be…

Credit: @larrykim / Twitter

Like, let’s be real, you were totally thinking the same thing.

And many were glad we may no longer have to hear about the horrors of plastic waste.

Like all too often you turn on the news and hear about animals being stuck, caught, wrapped up in plastic rings. Many even suffocate.

While at least on Twitter user thought about the implications for beer can furniture…

Credit: @larrykim

Because why not?!

And for the one person on Twitter who had their doubts…Twitter was ready with the truth.

Credit: @power97wpg / Twitter

Like for real though, I don’t know where you live that you thought you carry 24 cans of beer with plastic rings…

This New Drug Is Being Billed As Viagara For Women But People Are Skeptical About Why It Is Being Created

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This New Drug Is Being Billed As Viagara For Women But People Are Skeptical About Why It Is Being Created

How many times do we women say they’re not in the mood and blame it on a headache or that time of the month? It’s a common enough occurrence that sure has frustrated some men for centuries. Men don’t necessarily have that excuse, and that changed in 1996 when Viagra was officially patented and then approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) two years later.

Now 23 years later, women who are just not in the mood to get busy will be able to remedy that within 45 minutes.

The FDA just approved a new drug called Vyleesi that is the equivalent of Viagra but for women.

In 2015, researchers released a groundbreaking Viagra-type drug for women called Addyi. However, that drug had many issues. Women would have to take it every day and not consume any alcohol because a side effect could result in fainting. Vyleesi is different because women can take it 45 minutes before sexual intercourse, and experience minimal side effects.

According to The New York Times, 40 percent of the women that participated in the study for Vyleesi said they experienced nausea, and one percent of women said they had “darkening in their gums and parts of their skin, which did not go away in about half of the patients after they stopped treatment.”

They also suggest women who have high blood pressure or cardiovascular disease should not take Vyleesi. About 18 percent of the women dropped out of the study because of nausea. The biggest drawback appears that Vyleesi doesn’t come in a pill, but rather an injection.

Some claim that this drug will only enforce the notion that women must have sex with their partners despite not wanting to, and it has nothing to do with not being in the mood.

Some medical professionals say that women “not being in the mood for sex” doesn’t necessarily have to do with having a low sex drive but rather dealing with another range of emotions from stress, depression, and a slew of other mental health issues. This new drug will just reinforce that women must comply with their duties as partners and give in to sex.

“[Women] oftentimes having mercy or duty sex because they want to maintain their relationship,” Dr. Julie Krop, of AMAG Pharmaceuticals said to The New York Times. “The problem is, they’re distressed about having that sex that they are having.”

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