Entertainment

These 7 Narcocorridos Will Probably Piss You Off… Or Make You Dance

Corridos have been popular in Mexico for decades, but the sub-genre of narcocorridos has blown up over the last few years. Old folk stories have been overtaken by tales of drugs, death and vicious kingpins. And lots of those songs are graphic enough to make you go WTF!?

“El Primer Ministro” by Gerardo Ortiz

Credit: DEL Records/YouTube

Lyrics: “Me mantienen señalado pero no se han preguntado quien ayudara este pueblo como yo lo he ayudado. Lo recalco y lo repito y bien queda confirmado que seguire trabajando contra el poder del estado, esta no es una amenaza es un echo y lo he logrado.”

Translation: “I’m a marked man but they don’t ask themselves who will help this town the way I’ve helped it. I’ll reiterate it and repeat it – I’ll keep working against the power of the state. This isn’t a threat, it’s a fact and I’ve already done it.”

Ortiz pens an ode to Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán as if he is truly the Robin Hood of Sinaloa, Mexico.

“La Gallina de los Huevos” by Gonzalo Peña

CREDIT: Gonzalo Peña/YouTube

Lyrics: “Los errores de los grandes siempre ha sido una mujer.”

Translation: “The mistakes made by the greats always involve a woman.”

Once the news broke that actress Kate del Castillo was in contact with El Chapo, you knew a corrido was on its way. Gonzalo Peña’s corrido, “La Gallina de los Huevos,” says women are usually the downfall of great men. Excuse me? Women and del Castillo shouldn’t be blamed for every big mistake men make! Smuggling drugs is a HUGE mistake. And, Mr. Peña, there are lots of people who would disagree with your assertion that El Chapo is a “great man.”  In an interview with CNN, Peña says the song is a tribute to del Castillo for taking a big risk and meeting with El Chapo.

“Estrategias de Escape” by El Komander

CREDIT: marco gali/YouTube 

Lyrics: “Si el Señor no escapa háganlos pedazos disparen con rabia no pueden fallar.”

Translation: “If el Señor doesn’t escape, turn them into pieces, fire with rage, because you can’t fail.”

El Komander might just be the king of narcocorridos. Several states in Mexico have banned him from performing which led him take a hiatus from music in 2014. In one of his biggest songs, El Komander tells a story about El Chapo escaping authorities.

“El Corrido de la Barbie” by Roberto Tapia

Credit: eloxaco50/YouTube

Lyrics: “Para la mafia valor, pal enemigo balazos, pa cerebro es el negocio, pa las mujeres mis brazos, el costal pa los billetes, Colombia pal polvo blanco.”

Translation: “For the mafia, bravery. For enemies, bullets. Business is for the brain. For women, my arms. A bag for money and Colombia for cocaine.”

Tapia just gets straight to the point in these lyrics – women in la Barbie’s arms, trips to Colombia for cocaine and bullets for his enemies. Cartel kingpin “La Barbie” also made headlines as one of the highest-ranking U.S. citizens in El Chapo’s cartel. After breaking away from El Chapo and becoming his nemesis, La Barbie was arrested and extradited to the U.S.

“El Toro Pesado” by Grupo Exterminador

“El Más Bravo de los Bravos” by Los Tucanes de Tijuana

“Los Sanguinarios del M1” by Movimiento Alterado

Credit: TwiinsCuliacanTV / YouTube

Lyrics: “Van y hacen pedazos, a gente a balazos, rafagas continuas, que no se terminan, cuchillo afilado, cuerno atravezado, para degollar.

Translation: “They turn people into pieces with bullets, continuous blasts of gunfire that never stop, a sharpened knife across an AK-47, ready to behead.”

The Movimiento Alterado crew had no reservations about using a song to describe graphic violence. After all, the song is about a group of “bloodthirsty” hitmen who worked for Manuel Torres Felix, aka El M1. Torture, beheadings – it’s all referenced with delight in “Los Sanguinarios del M1.”

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Bad Bunny Goes Norteño: The Latin Trap Icon Joined Corrido Star Natanael Cano To Create The Wildest Mashup

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Goes Norteño: The Latin Trap Icon Joined Corrido Star Natanael Cano To Create The Wildest Mashup

Nataneal_cano / Instagram

Corrido is going from old-school abuelo music to a more urbano and trap-infused genre lately. The classic regional Mexican sound, known for its narrative folk ballads, is slowly but surely joining in on the ‘música urbana’ movement that has the whole world listening. And with Bad Bunny injecting his hip-hop and trap flair into the genre, we can confirm that corridos tumbados, are officially the new thing. 

After visiting Mexico for a run of tour dates in support of his latest album X 100Pre, Bad Bunny surprised us all with a unique project: a corrido. 

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

In his latest release, the trap-reggaeton star tapped the urban regional Mexican label, Rancho Humilde, for a collaboration that would bridge the gap between regional Mexican music and Puerto Rican música urbana —and surprise us all with the result. El Conejo Malo got in touch  with the urban corrido, or corrido tumbado artist, Natanael Cano.

Natanael Cano is part of a new school of Corrido, the ‘Corrido Tumbado’ which adds trap and urban influences to the classic genre.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Cano is part of a burgeoning movement of Mexican artists making trap corridos (or “corridos tumbados”) that incorporate hip-hop elements into the traditional corrido style. At just 18, Cano has turned into an internet sensation. His viral hits “El F1” and “El Drip” have more than 17 million views on Youtube. And his song “El de la Codeína” made it to #1 on Apple Music’s Latino chart.

With the remix to ‘Soy El Diablo’ Bad Bunny wants to promote unity among all Latinx communities.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Bad Bunny and Natanel Cano emerged with a remix of Cano’s gritty 2019 track, “Soy El Diablo” (“I Am the Devil”). Taking cues from the Sonora native, Bunny sings Cano’s lines in his unmistakably Caribbean accent, over strums of acoustic guitar.

“Para mi gente linda de Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latinoamerica/Eso es pa’ toda mi raza/ America es nuestra casa,” says one of Bad Bunny’s lines —using the song as a platform to promote unity among all Latinx communities. “This is for my beautiful people in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latin America/This is for my race/America is our home!”

Bad Bunny had been teasing the collab for a few weeks.

The unlikely pair dropped the first official urbano/corrido collab in October, weeks after teasing at it with Benito posting videos of himself on Instagram singing along to the song and drinking tequila from the bottle. “It’s something I never imagined. Like, zero percent,” Cano said in an interview about the remix. But the Mexican artist is acutely aware of the important place that Latin urbano sounds hold in the global musical landscape of the moment. “We’re the new generation [of regional], and we have that other sound naturally inside of us. It’s organic.”

In the song Bad Bunny even uses regional Mexican slang and references.

The corrido opens with Bad Bunny’s “Ajuaaaa.” His delivery, and even his slang —which include shout outs to Canelo Álvarez and Rancho Humilde and words like “compa,” and “banda” are typical of the regional genre to refer to the people— show the importance that Benito gave this remix.

The collab was first suggested to both parties by Marissa Gastelum, who runs Latin artist relations at Apple Music.

Credit: ranchohumilde/ Instagram

“In September, Noah [Assad, Bad Bunny’s manager] called me and asked me what I thought of this kid,” recalls Gastelum in an interview with Billboard. “He told me Bad Bunny really loves this song ‘Soy El Diablo.’ And I said, wait, lets do something!”

Gastelum called Jimmy Humilde, the owner of indie Rancho Humilde  Records, to which Cano is signed. Humilde, who has worked to create an “urban regional” sound that appeals to a younger generation of regional Mexican fans, thought it was a great idea, and so the regional/urban remix was born.

Bad Bunny chased his tequila-fueled release with a string of New England tour dates — and a stint as guest lecturer at Harvard University. If we can count on Benito to do one thing, it’s to inject his cool-effect on anything he touches. 

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This Brother And Sister Duo Have Gone Viral With Their Powerful Corrido About Current Deportations

Entertainment

This Brother And Sister Duo Have Gone Viral With Their Powerful Corrido About Current Deportations

Yaxeni Y Ricardo Los Luzeros De Rioverde / Facebook

If you look up the definition of a corrido, Google will tell you that it is a “ballad in a traditional Mexican style, typically having lyrics that narrate a historical event.” Key word here is “historical,” so if you hear those corridos that our parents played back in the day, you’d know what was going down in the Latino community during that time. Today, Latinos are going through a myriad complexities, and there’s a new generation of writers and performers that are singing about this crucial and terrifying time.

Meet brother and sister act Yaxeni y Ricardo who call themselves Los Luzeros De Rioverde. The siblings are a corrido band that is singing about the harsh times facing the community under the current administration.

These cute kids are Houston natives and while they look very young they are wise beyond their years.

In their short time as artists, they’ve already released three albums. Their latest is called “Con amor y sentimiento.”

All of their albums feature songs in both English and Spanish.

They’s performed for audiences at various venues, including in national tv for people like Steve Harvey.

Yup, they were featured on “Little Big Shots.”

However, they’re latest corrido is causing big waves on the internet because it’s about deportation.

"SI ME DEPORTAN " Algo de lo que viene en nuestro tercer disco titulado Con Amor y Sentimiento Esperenlo Agosto 10 saldra ala Venta en todas laa tiendas Dijitales! (Primicia para Noticias Telemundo ) #simedeportan #conamorysentimiento #uaua #losluzerosderioverde #openupyourheartamerica #openupyourheart #letssingalltogether #telemundo

Posted by Yaxeni Y Ricardo Los Luzeros De Rioverde on Sunday, August 5, 2018

The song is called “Si me deportan” (“If I get deported”).

The brother and sister sing about the strict laws of the United States, and they sing through the point of view of their parents.

“What if they deport us with our kids/even though they were born in the United States,” the song begins.

“We are millions who live here illegally/but we came here to improve our lives/and even though they call us criminals, that will never get us down.”

The duo has been showered with praise and love for the song highlighting the terrifying situation so many people are experiencing right now.

In 2016, Yaxeni y Ricardo talked about being against deportation and the separation of families.

They released a song about deportation back then called “El Descendiente” (The Offspring).

“We want to be the voice of all those kids who don’t have a voice,” Yaxeni said.

CREDIT: YouTube/
Yaxeni Y Ricardo Los Luzeros De Rioverde

To learn more about Los Luzeros De Rioverde check out their YouTube page and their Facebook page.

READ: These Young Mexican-Americans Just Wrote A Corrido For Bernie Sanders

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