Culture

13 Mexican Sayings that Sound Really Weird When They’re Translated Literally

When you grow up Mexican and bilingual, there are plenty of Spanish phrases that can totally get lost in translation, especially if you’re around friends who don’t speak Español. Trying to explain or translate them literally, you realize how ridiculous they sound. You know, stuff like this:

“¿A poco?”

a poco meme

Credit: memegenerator.net

Literal translation: A little.

What it really means: You don’t say!?

How it sounds in Spanish:  Friend: “Estoy embarazada.” You: “A poco!?”

How it sounds if you translate it literally: Friend: “I’m pregnant.” You: “A little?”

“¿Qué pedo?”

Qué Pedo meme

Credit: unknownmamipage/Facebook

Literal translation: “What fart?”

What it really means: “What’s up?”

How it sounds in Spanish: “Te veo enojada… ¿que pedo?”

How it sounds if you translate it literally: “You seem upset. What fart with you?”

“Soltar un madrazo.”

Credit: unknownmamipage/Facebook

Literal translation: “A big mother.”

What it really means: To strike someone with force, usually on the head.

How it sounds in Spanish: “Dejate de burlarte de mis cejas o te voy a dar un madrazo.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “You better stop teasing me about my eyebrows or I will release a big mother on you!”

READ: These Memes Sum Up How Unfazed Latinas are after a Breakup

“Cuates.”

Pedro Infante cuates meme

Credit: generadormemes.com

Literal translation: Twins.

What it really means: Bros, buddies or compadres.

How it sounds in Spanish: “Mis cuates son buenos para tirar desmadre.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “My twins really know how to party.”

“Sangrón.”

Sangrón

Credit: quickmeme.com

Literal translation: Bloody.

What it really means: Annoying.

How it sounds in Spanish: “No puedo soportar a ese güey, es sangrón.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “I can’t stand that fool, he’s so bloody.”

“¡Me vale madre!”

me vale madre meme

Credit: quickmeme.com

Literal translation: It’s worth a mother.

What it really means: I don’t give a shit.

How it sounds in Spanish: “Ámame o odiame, me vale madre.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “Love me or hate me, it’s worth mother to me.”

READ: 8 Memes Only Latinos Understand

“Por si las moscas.”

Por si las moscas meme

Credit: memegenerator.es

Literal translation: In case the flies.

What it really means:  Just in case.

How it sounds in Spanish: “No pienso dormir en tu casa esta noche, pero voy a traer un par de calzones por si las moscas.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “I’m not planning on spending the night, but I’m bringing an extra pair of chonies in case the flies.”

“Estoy encabronada / Estoy encabronado.”

encabronada

Credit: unknownmamipage/Facebook

Literal translation: I have become a goat.

What it really means: Pissed off.

How it sounds in Spanish: “Ya se que me veo calmada, pero estoy encabronada.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “I know I look chill on the outside, but I have become a goat on the inside.”

“¡Sepa la bola!”

Sepa la bola meme

Credit: generadormemes.com

Literal translation: The ball knows.

What it really means:  I have no idea.

How it sounds in Spanish: “Todos preguntan de donde fulanita saca tanto dinero para comprar Gucci pirata y yo digo, ‘Sepa la bola.'”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “Everyone is always asking where fulanita gets the money to buy all that fake Gucci and I’m all, ‘The ball knows.'”

READ: People on Social React Like Savages to News of El Chapo’s Capture

¿Qué onda?

Que onda meme

Credit: memeandote.com

Literal translation: What wave?

What it really means:  What’s up?

How it sounds in Spanish: “¿Que onda? ¿Ontan las muchachas?”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “What wave? Where the ladies at?”

“¡No mames!”

no mames meme

Credit: memegenerator.net

Literal translation: Don’t suck.

What it really means:  No way! (But it can be used in so many ways)

How it sounds in Spanish: Friend: “Me aceptarón en Harvard.” You: “¡No mames!

How it would sound if you translated literally: Friend: “I just got accepted to Harvard!” You: “Don’t suck!”

“Estoy pedo”

pedo meme

“¡Aguas!”

Aguas memes

Credit: imgflip.com

Literal translation: Waters!

What it really means:  Watch out! Also: Be careful!

How it sounds in Spanish: “Aguas, ese perro es bravo.”

How it would sound if you translated literally: “WATERS, that dog is vicious!”

What’s you favorite untranslatable saying? Let us know and no seas gacho, hit that share button. 

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Entertainment

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña may be two of Hollywood’s biggest Mexican-American stars, but now they can add teaching to their long list of experience.

You’re probably thinking, neta? Yes, really! Okay, well, technically…

Longoria and Peña, who are starring in this summer’s live-action Dora the Explorer film as Dora’s mother and father respectively, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, sat down with Vanity Fair to teach us (and test their own knowledge) Mexican slang. Whether you’re Mexican or not, you’ve probably heard a few of these classic phrases floating around. For example, “no manches,” which Peña explains has a lot of different definitions depending on the context, but generally translates to “get out of here” or “shut up” when responding to something that’s surprising or you just can’t believe. But these two can definitely explain it better than I can.

The definition and use of terms such as chicano, pedo, chamba, naco, among a ton of others are also broken down by the Dora and the Lost City of Gold actors in this hilarious video.

Now, be honest, how many of these do you use on a daily basis? Or how many did you have no idea what they actually meant?

The 44-year-old Corpus Christi native and the 43-year-old Chicago-born Narcos: Mexico actor aren’t the first to be recruited by Vanity Fair to teach us Mexican slang. In 2017, while on a press run for her film How to Be a Latin Lover, Salma Hayek sat in the tutorial hot seat to challenge others in the art of Mexican slang. The 52-year-old actress, who was born in Mexico, listed a few of the same phrases as shared by Longoria and Peña, but also explained the meaning behind several expressions such as “no mames,” “hombres malos,” “eso que ni que,” “tienes feria,” and “me vale madres.”

I think it’s safe to say that Salma Hayek taught us a lot of important ones here, amirite?

With Peña and Longoria’s new film, it’s probably important to become acquainted with a few of these phrases—Dora is, after all, an iconic Latina character. And the latest live-action movie features a number of Mexican and Mexican-American actors (Peña, Longoria, Eugenio Derbez, Danny Trejo, Adriana Barraza Isela Vega), so who knows if some of these terms will make their way to this big screen debut.

Based on Nickelodeon’s highly popular educational pre-school series, Dora the ExplorerDora and the Lost City of Gold follows a teenaged Dora (played by Isabela Moner) as she heads off to high school—which just might be her biggest and most challenging adventure yet. The quirky fun film sends Dora off on a mission to track down her parents, who are in need of saving, and enlists the help of her friends, including her primo Diego (played by Jeff Wahlberg) and monkey Boots. Along the way, she comes across familiar faces, like Swiper the Fox (voiced by Benicio del Toro)—who remembers the catchphrase, swiper no swiping?—while also trying to solve the mystery behind a lost Incan civilization.

The character of Dora the Explorer has played such an important role for Latino and non-Latino children alike.

Ok, so perhaps not teaching them Mexican slang like our friends Eva Longoria, Michael Peña and Salma Hayek, but most definitely teaching them Spanish. That was the case for one of those behind this new live-action take on Dora.

“My daughter knows Spanish because of Dora,” Dora and the City of Gold director James Bobin told the Los Angeles Times. “When she was little, I remember saying to her once, ‘What’s your favorite animal?’ And she said, ‘Ardilla.’ And I went, ‘A deer?’ and got a picture from a book of a deer. And she goes, ‘No, no, no, no, ardilla’ and pointed out the window [because] ardilla in Spanish is squirrel.”

And like its cartoon counterpart, Dora and the City of Gold hopes to appeal to all audiences. “The beautiful thing of the story is that thematically, it’s pretty universal,” Eva Longora said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “I think everybody’s going to understand it and relate to it. You don’t have to be Latino, but it is a celebration of our culture within the movie. Our language is in it, people who [reflect] our community are in it, it’s organically Latino. It wasn’t like ‘Insert Latino here.’ ”

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is in theaters everywhere August 9.

A Woman Was Spying On Her Neighbors And Got Her Head Stuck In A Fence And I’d Like To Nominate Her For Sainthood

Entertainment

A Woman Was Spying On Her Neighbors And Got Her Head Stuck In A Fence And I’d Like To Nominate Her For Sainthood

mundoactualizate / Instagram

So how bad do you crave the chisme? Be real. I’m pretty sure I can speak for all of us when I say that pretty much everyone is down for gossip.

Like try and tell me you aren’t the person that peers down from their window when they hear an argument outside. Or that you aren’t the type that glances over at the phone of the person sitting next to you on the Metro.

Well one woman has taken that need for chisme to the next level.

In La Virginia, Colombia, a gossipy neighbor needed to know exactly what was going down in her vecina’s home. So this happened.

Credit: mundoactualizate / Instagram

Yup. She got herself, well her head really, stuck between the bars of the house she was trying to spy on. The woman remained stuck for five hours, five hours, until rescuers arrived to cut away the metal bars.

I mean we’re all down for gossip but you have to exercise caution when trying to get the tea.

Credit: @UltimaHora_hn / Twitter

Translation: “The supposed curiosity of a woman in Colombia nearly got her killed…”

Like I’m pretty sure nobody wants to get that kind of a headline written about them after going viral.

To be fair…we don’t know for sure if the woman was actually snooping but after going viral, social media was quick to jump to that conclusion.

And yes, some in the photo were definitely laughing at her.

Credit: Radio La Roca FM 103.9 / Facebook

I mean like if I was there I’d be laughing too.

One suggested the man laughing in the photo had to be her husband.

Credit: Radio La Roca FM 103.9 / Facebook

Translation: “Look how the husband shits with laughter”

Because only a husband could get away with laughing at this. And even that’s a stretch.

And now from Colombia to Honduras to the U.S., the woman has made international headlines.

But luckily for her, at least her face isn’t visible in any of the photos so la chimosa mas famosa remains anonymous. For now.

Making headlines isn’t exactly what you want to do when you set out to spy on your vecinos.

Translation: “If she wanted to go unnoticed, she didn’t succeed.”

Usually, you want to be as discreet as possible. It’s safe to say, this woman was not.

But many on Twitter had nothing but mad props to offer this hardcore chismosa.

As one Twitter user replied to a post about the woman by Remezcla, #Respect. You keep doing you just be more careful next time.

READ: New Study Says The 52 Minutes We Spend Gossiping A Day Is Actually Good For The Soul

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