politics

101-Year-Old Mexican Abuelito Got His U.S. Citizenship To Vote Against Donald Trump

AGENCIA EFE / YouTube
Credit: Agencia Efe / YouTube

They became citizens so they could help other immigrants.

Ignacio Villegas Arellano and his wife, Maria Guadalupe Correa de Villegas, have been legal permanent residents of the United states since 1968. But then the rise of Donald Trump happened, prompting the 101-year-old Villegas Arellano to become a full-fledged citizen . His 94-year-old wife followed his lead just one week after his April 19 naturalization. Though they were in the country legally, the couple says that Trump’s insistence on deporting undocumented Mexican immigrants left them scared they would be rounded up, as well. Ignacio was a farmworker, traveling between the U.S. and Mexico for years before settling in California, thanks in large part to his children.

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla was at the naturalization in Fresno and praised the couple on their accomplishment.

Credit: @AlexPadilla4CA / Twitter

“For many, applying to become a citizen can be frightening and the process can be intimidating,” Secretary Padilla told mitú in an emailed statement. “I know this on a personal level. My mother and father became citizens almost twenty years ago. I remember my parents worry as they studied for the citizenship test. Like Mr. Villegas, they were successful. Mr. Villegas can now be a louder voice for his community and help shape the direction of our state and our nation.”

¡Orale!

giphy
Credit: Giphy / Giphy

READ: Latinos Are Becoming U.S. Citizens To Vote Against Trump

Register to vote today by downloading the Latinos Vote app for iOS and Android. Our voice matters. #WeAreAmerica

Guatemala’s Groundbreaking Decision To Allow U.S.- Based Citizens To Vote Could Change The Way We Cast Ballots In The Near Future

Things That Matter

Guatemala’s Groundbreaking Decision To Allow U.S.- Based Citizens To Vote Could Change The Way We Cast Ballots In The Near Future

lili_v_corona / Instagram

Voting in every single election is a crucial part of voicing your concerns about how your country is run. It’s also the perfect time to dictate change, especially with presidential elections.

There’s so much corruption in Latin American — and in the U.S. — that the only way we can make a difference is by voting corruption out. That’s exactly what is taking place in Central America.

Elections are taking place in Guatemala and for the first time ever, 60,000 Guatemalans living in the U.S. will be able to cast their vote.

Credit: @Forbes / Twitter

“At least 60,000 were eligible to vote in Los Angeles, New York, Maryland and Washington, D.C., all home to large numbers of Guatemalan emigres,” the Associated Press is reporting.

Aside from voting for a new president, Guatemalans will be able to vote for a new vice-president, 158 congress members, and 340 mayors. Guatemalans living in the U.S. will only be able to vote for the president and vice president.

These elections are extremely important as the three previous presidents have been charged with corruption.

Credit: @BoscoJI65 / Twitter

“There is a belief that instead of advancing in these four years of government, we’ve gone backward,” Marco René Cuellar, 39, told the New York Times. “We’ve lost our way as a country, but we should not lose faith in the democratic process we have.”

Furthermore, the next president can help bring peace to the country and end the mass exodus that is going on in Guatemala.

Credit: @WSJ / Twitter

Since 2016, more than 90,000 Guatemalans have been deported from the U.S, NPR reports, and thousands more make the trek back due to lack of work, violence, and poverty.

While voting is taking place now, the second round of voting will happen in August.

Out of 19 presidential candidates including a former First Lady and an indigenous woman, it looks like Guatemala will have a female leader.

Credit: @Reuters / Twitter

According to the Times, “Sandra Torres had captured more than 22 percent of the vote, followed by four-time presidential candidate Alejandro Giammattei with 16 percent.” They also report none of the candidates will secure 50 percent of the votes or more so that 22 percent is looking really good for Torres.  

READ: Here’s How These Huaraches Are Helping Guatemala’s Mayans Fight Pollution

The 2020 Census Will Include A Question Asking About Citizenship And It Will Be Disastrous For Our Community

Things That Matter

The 2020 Census Will Include A Question Asking About Citizenship And It Will Be Disastrous For Our Community

@luizfernandovl / Twitter

On April 1, 2020, the U.S. government will tally all of the people that live in the United States, but not everyone will be counted. The purpose of the Census — which take place every ten years — is to properly account for everyone that lives in the U.S. in order to have a correct figure in place for funding purposes, research, and have accurate statistics of all residents.

A new study reveals that more than 4 million people will go uncounted in the 2020 Census and that would be disastrous for the country.

Credit: @mariancruz905 / Twitter

The Urban Institute, a nonpartisan organization, showed that the leading group that could be lost within the Census would be black and brown people.

“Every American should be counted, regardless of race, ethnicity, age, income or where they live,” Diana Elliott, a senior research associate at the Urban Institute, said in a statement to NBC News. “The Census is a key building block of our government and our society at the national, state, and local level. Miscounts of this magnitude will have real consequences for the next decade, including how we fund programs for children and invest in our infrastructure.”

At the core of the issue is that some communities are difficult to reach while others won’t fill it out due to fear of discrimination or deportation.

Credit: @desiderioDC / Twitter

The report shows that most communities with white people are estimated to be over-counted by Census workers, where black and brown communities go under-counted.

It’s also no secret that the Trump administration seeks to add a citizenship question as well, which is currently under ligation. The Trump Administration has said they added that question in order to avoid voter fraud, but Latinx and immigration advocates the question will hurt states where immigrants and undocumented people live.

“These newly discovered documents clearly show the Trump Administration intended for the 2020 Census’ citizenship question to intimidate communities of color and silence us from participating in our democracy,” Democratic lawmakers said in a press release statement. “Furthermore, throughout the legal fights since Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’ decision to add the citizenship question, this Administration has intentionally lied to the American people and Congress about their dubious intentions for altering the Census. The proof of their motivation has come to light, and it demonstrates with incontrovertible evidence that this Administration is working to undermine the foundations of our government. The results of the Census will change the course of our country for the next decade. It will decide how much federal funding communities receive, who is represented in Congress, and what kind of country the next generation inherits.”

The report shows the states that face the most discrepancies include California, Texas, New Mexico, Nevada, Georgia, New York, and Florida.

Credit: @votolatino / Twitter

Here are some of their key findings:

  • The undercount of the US population overall in 2020 could range from 0.27 percent in the low-risk scenario to 1.22 percent in the high-risk scenario.
  • Some states face a greater risk of undercounts because they have large populations of historically undercounted groups. California has the greatest undercount risk, with projected 2020 undercounts ranging from 0.95 percent (low risk) to 1.98 percent (high risk). Other states at risk for serious undercount are Texas, New Mexico, Nevada, Georgia, New York, and Florida.
  • The miscounts may disproportionately affect some groups more than others. Black and Hispanic/Latinx-identified individuals in the high-risk scenario could be undercounted nationally by 3.68 percent and 3.57 percent, respectively.
  • White, non-Hispanic/Latinx individuals could be overcounted nationally by 0.03 percent in the high-risk scenario. States with the greatest potential for overcounts include Vermont, West Virginia, Maine, New Hampshire, and Montana. These states have large populations of white, non-Hispanic/Latinx residents.
  • Children younger than 5, who have historically been undercounted, are at risk of being undercounted by as much as 6.31 percent in the high-risk scenario.

READ: Latinos Face Severe Underrepresentation With 2020 Census, Here’s Why That Matters

Paid Promoted Stories