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You Won’t Believe Why Demi Lovato Is Thanking The Kardashians

CREDIT: THE ELLEN SHOW / YOUTUBE

Thank You Kim, Khloé and Kourtney

Demi Lovato has been flaunting her curves with such confidence, you’d think she was always that way. She even has an album titled “Confidence” where she sings about, well, her confidence.

But Demi wasn’t always as confident about her body as she is now. She actually went to rehab for an eating disorder back in 2010. “When I was growing up… it was in the era when very, very thin people were the popular ones in Hollywood,” Demi said to Ellen DeGeneres on her show. “That’s what I had to look up to.”

READ: The Kardashians: Reimagined as Mexicanas

But then Kim, Kourtney and Khloé Kardashian surfaced as the most popular. “When the Kardashians came on the scene, that was the first time that I associated curves with beauty and I remember thinking it was so cool,” Demi said. “Even when I was struggling with food, I was able to look at Kim’s curves and be like, ‘I should really be proud of my curves.”

So thanks to the Kardashian Kurves, many, including Demi, can learn to appreciate their curves, because there’s nothing sexier than seriously flaunting them.

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Will Mexican Fans Ever Stop The 'P••o' Chant At Soccer Games?

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Will Mexican Fans Ever Stop The ‘P••o’ Chant At Soccer Games?

Patrick Smith / Getty

If you’ve ever watched a fútbol match featuring Mexico’s national team or a club team from Mexico, you’re probably familiar with this chant:

Credit: Libey JhDyz / YouTube

Yep, the popular “Ehhhhhhhh… p**o” chant used to taunt goalkeepers. It’s been around for a little more than a decade.

Credit: Tómas Salinas / YouTube

According to Mediotiempo.com, the chant began gaining traction in the early 2000s, when fans of Guadalajara’s Atlas FC turned a harmless “Ehhhh… PUM” chant into the one you hear today. Eventually, the chant spread and became ubiquitous at games featuring Mexico’s national team.

Mexico fans gleefully used the chant at the 2014 World Cup and EVERYONE noticed. Here’s a clip from Mexico vs. Brazil:

Credit: Luis Corvini / YouTube

The whole world was watching, and the chant was audible during broadcasts of the matches. Soon, fans from other countries began asking themselves, “What’s with the ‘p**o’ chant?”

After hearing the chant from Mexico fans, Brazil’s fans began using the chant to taunt Mexico’s goalkeeper.

Credit: Mark Harpin / YouTube

And thanks to the World Cup, the chant even made its way to Japan.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVnHTVjqffk

Credit: Gigantes de la Costa MX / YouTube

During the tournament, many people criticized Mexico fans for using a “homophobic chant.”

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Credit: Miguel Tovar / Getty

Many pointed out that the word p**o, slang for “male prostitute,” is rooted in homophobia. In many countries, it’s used the same way as f****t. Mike Woitalla of Soccer America magazine told NPR: “The Mexican team is playing wonderful soccer, and their fans are traditionally wonderful fans, and right now, with this chant, they are bringing shame upon themselves.” Mexicans argued that in the context of the chant, the word p**o was just an insult – like the word “f****r” – and not meant to be homophobic.  FIFA, which investigated Mexico’s use of the chant, eventually agreed. FIFA officials declared that the chant “was not considered insulting in the specific context.”

This year, Mexico got a rude awakening – the Mexican soccer federation was fined $20,000 by FIFA after fans used the chant during a Mexico vs. El Salvador World Cup qualifying match.

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Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty

After being cleared in 2014, Mexico fans assumed the debate was over. But Mexico, along with Argentina, Chile, Peru and Uruguay, were fined earlier this year for using “insulting and discriminatory chants.”

Although federation officials said they would appeal the fine, Mexico’s federation president, Decio de Maria, recently told reporters that Mexico should work to eliminate the chant from games.

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Credit: Manuel Velasquez / Getty

In a press conference, de Maria said that it didn’t matter whether the chant is homophobic or not: “At the end of the day, it’s a chant that insults someone. I think as a society, we shouldn’t do that.”

READ: Here’s Why Rob Schneider Loves Mexican Soccer So Much

Where do you stand on the chants? Click on the share button below to discuss with your friends!