Things That Matter

People Complain Latinos Don’t Always Graduate, But These Signs Point to They’re Not Helping

Opening the Path to Success for Latinos

“America should provide the key that will lead to the door of success,” says Jesus Suatan. However, this country has limited access to education to students that are undocumented or don’t have the money to pay tuition. Let’s get real: the average cost for an in-state college is $10,000 for ONE year. Who has that kind of money just sitting in their bank account anyway? Limiting access limits potential – duh! So US, how about instead of limiting our potential, you help us grow? Watch above to see how these students are eager to demonstrate their capabilities.

mitú challenges you to share your own story in a social media post, a meme, or any way you feel most comfortable, and post it on your favorite social channel using #WeAreAmerica. Together, we will create a beautiful portrait of what it means to be Latino in the US.

MIT Just Announced Their First Black Woman Student Body President

Things That Matter

MIT Just Announced Their First Black Woman Student Body President

As a Massachusetts Institute of Technology undergrad, Danielle Geathers has already accomplished so much. And yet, recently she accomplished a feat that is making history. When the college student returns back to her classes at MIT this fall, she will be the first in the school’s 159- year history to do so as a Black female student body president.

Geathers, who is 22 years old, was recently elected by her student body as the president of the Undergraduate Association.

She will take up the torch as president alongside her running mate Yu Jing Chen. Speaking to MIT’s student newspaper The Tech, Geathers explained that it “didn’t surprise me that no black women had been president… Someone asked if the UA president was a figurehead role [during the debate]. I think no, but minimally, a black female in that role will squash every perception that MIT is still mostly white and male… Minimally, the immediate image of that will make MIT a more welcoming and inclusive place.”

Geathers, who is a major in mechanical engineering with a concentration in product design is also working on a minor in African and American diaspora studies.

Last year, Geathers served as the United Association’s diversity officer. Speaking about her initial efforts to run for president, Geathers said that she felt quite a bit of doubt and uncertainty about running. “Who am I to be president?” Geathers told The Tech about her mindset at the time. Fortunately, Geathers decided to run, “I talked to a couple of people who said, ‘That is the problem with America.’ People who care about equity never want to run for the main role because they think they’re not for it.”

Speaking about why her race and the one of her running mate had an important role in her campaign, Geathers said “We try to ignore the communities that people are from, but that’s what’s gonna make them good.”

It’s important to note that 6% of MIT’s undergraduate students are Black, and only 47% are women.

A 13-Year-Old Student Just Became A California College’s Youngest Graduate

Things That Matter

A 13-Year-Old Student Just Became A California College’s Youngest Graduate

@WBTV_News /twitter

Thirteen-year-old Jack Rico might not be able to drive but he’s going full speed ahead when it comes to his education.

The California-based teenager has wracked up a handful of college degrees under belt including an associate’s degree from Fullerton College which he earned this week.

Rico’s latest degree makes him officially the youngest graduate student from the community college.

Rico started taking college courses at the age of eleven and has since spent his time earning different degrees. “It has been a pure joy having Jack as a son and I couldn’t be any prouder of him,” Ru Andrade told People magazine in a recent interview.

It turns out, Rico has loved learning for years now, proving himself to be, as his mother describes “not your average kid.” When Rico was just 3 years old when he took a visit to the White House for his 4th birthday. “I told him that was a big trip for a little guy, and that I would take him if he could learn all the presidents,” she explained in an interview. “A week later he said, ‘Mom, I have a confession to make. I already knew all the presidents, but I learned all the vice presidents if that will still count?'”

According to Andrade, Rico actually had a rough start to his education.

Rico started his education in public school but struggled with the work until his mother decided to have him homeschooled when he was in third grade so that he could focus on his areas of weakness.

“When he was 11, I knew he needed more of a challenge and a better teacher than me,” Andrade explained. To do so she enrolled Rico in Fullerton College’s Bridge Program. “He started out just taking one class and he absolutely loved it. He just kept requesting taking more and more classes.”

While Rico won’t be able to attend a traditional graduation ceremony to celebrate his achievements this year due to coronavirus restrictions, his family has planned a special drive-by event in La Mirada to celebrate.

Turns, out four degrees, isn’t enough for Rico.

Rico is due to attend the University of Nevada this coming fall on a full scholarship. He’ll take classes Monday through Wednesday, and will commute. He reportedly will focus his studies on history.

“Jack is not a genius, he just works really hard. We are so happy for Jack and all his academic accomplishments, however, he is an even more awesome human being. He has a sister with autism that he has just been an amazing brother too,” Andrade explained.

Check out a video about Rico and his achievements below.