Culture

Have You Noticed Latinos Only Get Screen Time During Junk Food Commercials? 

Just when you thought Latinos don’t get any screen time… Boom! There they are, all over the place – in fast food commercials, that is. They’re telling you how delicious that cheeseburger is, how comforting that sopita is when you’re sick, and how that coke is the best thing to quench your thirst. It has to be good if other Latinos are telling me to eat this stuff, right? Latinos don’t lie; it’s a sin. So wudduya mean these foods aren’t good for me? I have to buy them now, you know, to support Latinos in show business… And shame on us because we keep eating it.

All-American Coca-Cola commercials are flooded with Latinos.

Coca-Cola
Credit: Listitude Politics / Coca-Cola / YouTube

Too bad one serving of this all-American beverage offers almost double your daily recommended sugar intake at a staggering 44 grams. Listen, Coca-Cola, diabetes rates for Latino-Americans is already 6 percent higher than non-Latino whites so just chill with your inclusive marketing.

Mars, Inc. spent one-quarter of their ad budget on Spanish-language TV ads like this one with Rebelde star, Anahí.

Credit: anahichannelone/ Snickers / Youtube

Even if Anahí tells you Snickers brings you back to life, put this snack down. While the chocolate coating, crunchy peanuts, and oh-so-smooth caramel are euphoric, the amount of sugar is alarming. One bar has 6 times the amount of sugar needed to affect the blood stream. Didn’t we just finish talking about diabetes? ?

McDonald’s commercials have enough Latinos for a feature film.

McDonalds
Credit: Philip Albuquerque / McDonald’s / YouTube

With all this color and ritmo, I feel like I’m watching a J.Lo music video. Do these dancers know that one order of the 10 piece McNuggets contains 470 calories…before the dipping sauce? Plus, McNuggets have always been a gamble. Sure, there’s some sort of chicken but you might also get a bit of plastic or vinyl with your bite-size fried treat. I’m just saying, buyer beware…

READ: Latinos, CVS Wants to Win You Over with Fabuloso and Suavitel

Del Slush? Are these like frozen aguas frescas?! Yum.

Sonic
Credit: Sonic Drive-In / YouTube

Nope. Just Spanish for sugar overload in a cup. If a can of Coca-Cola with 44 grams of sugar is double the recommended daily sugar intake, then Sonic’s 92 grams of sugar per slush should be a crime. Who decided to mix slushes and candy anyway? ¡Estúpido!

Oh, look! Cute Latino niños in this Taco Bell ad.

Taco Bell Kid
Credit: Saul dominguez / Taco Bell / YouTube

But if I had kids, I would forget about feeding them the .99¢ Cheesy Potato Burrito because it contains an adult’s daily dose of sodium. Also, shouldn’t we be concerned about meat for less than $1? You get what you pay for, remember that.

READ: #GrowingUpHispanics Means VapoRub, Walter Mercado, Chanclas, and So Much Cleaning

…And McDonald’s is back with more Latino actors.

McDonalds Family
Credit: AlmaAgency / YouTube

Have they run out of white actors? Pero, que cute is this commercial, no? The answer is no. Papi’s Big Mac meal will set him back 1,120 calories and is another example of fast food packed with sodium, 1,240 milligrams to be exact. Nothing says familia like matching cholesterol, right?

These Latinos are telling us Progresso sopitas got healthier.

Progresso
Credit: Fernanda Revilla / Progresso / YouTube

Okay. Not all Progresso soups are bad for you, but the full flavor ones sure are, just look at the sodium content. The problem is, the study found that the ads targeting Latino youth never include the healthy option. I see you, Progresso. I’ll take abuela’s caldo instead, thank you very much.

Who wants Güendis? They’re healthy, right?

Wendys
Credit: I’eapan Spot / Wendy’s / YouTube

Why are my people lying to me? ? It is one thing to insult our intelligence about healthy food, but now you make fun of our accent? That’s too far. Thanks to the Internet, we know your Asiago Ranch Chicken sandwich has even more sodium than McDonald’s. Next time, just give us a bag of salt so we can at least know what it going into our bodies.

Taco Bell assures the A.M. Crunchwrap is abuelita approved, but is it?

Taco Bell Abuelas
Credit: A.M. Crunchwrap / Taco Bell / iSpot.tv

Woah. I don’t know about you but my abuela would not approve this one-handed breakfast abomination. If you want enough salt to spike cholesterol and usher in a stroke before breakfast, this is just the thing you need.

“Hay comida en la casa. Comemos alla.” Words to live by, mis gentes. ?

What do you think about companies heavily marketing unhealthy food to Latino youth? mitú wants to know. Tell us in the comments below!

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How This Latina-Created Club Is Helping Women Feel Safe And Confident On Hiking Trails

Fierce

How This Latina-Created Club Is Helping Women Feel Safe And Confident On Hiking Trails

Growing up in a Guatemalan-African American home in Woodbridge, Virginia, Evelynn Escobar-Thomas didn’t feel like outdoor activities were always accessible to her. After a few summer trips to Los Angeles, where she hiked regularly with her aunt, she realized that she enjoyed nature.

However, with little representation of women of color on trails in mainstream media or in the real world, she often felt excluded from the outdoor recreations she took so much pleasure in.

Evelynn Escobar-Thomas

Hoping to create a safe, fun space that could encourage more women like her to bask in the natural environments around them, she created Hike Clerb.

Founded in 2017, Hike Clerb is an intersectional women’s hiking club and nonprofit aimed at creating experiences in the outdoors that are accessible, empowering and inclusive. While primarily located in Los Angeles, where Escobar-Thomas relocated partly because of its biodiversity, the collective is international, with members as far as South Africa and the United Kingdom. Although predominantly consisting of women of color, the collective is open to anyone who shares the group’s vision and mission.

“There’s a huge sense of community and empowerment because we are out there as a collective of women of different shapes, sizes and colors,” the 29-year-old social activist tells FIERCE. “Women of all walks of life come together to honor ourselves, our bodies and our own individual healing journeys through this radical community.”

In Los Angeles, Hike Clerb hosts monthly treks in areas that are easy to commute to and are capable of being completed by veteran and newbie hikers alike. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, these regular in-person trudges, which could include crowds of 10 to 100 people, have mostly been put on pause. However, the group did link up once in June for a protest hike in support of Assembly Bill 345, legislation that would have created environmental protections for communities living near oil and gas operations in California that failed to pass.

“We met up for a hike protest in support of this bill and had signs and information on how others can get involved,” Escobar-Thomas says.


With social distancing mandates in place, the group has focused on new ways to create community. For instance, Hike Clerb posts monthly challenges that encourage followers to hike on specific days and photograph themselves in an effort to establish a sense of togetherness even though they are all physically apart. Additionally, Escobar-Thomas has been using social media to educate users on hiking etiquette, safety tips as well as on the racist history of public spaces like U.S. parks, trails and beaches.

“Let’s be real here: these spaces, although outdoors, which you would think by default are open to anyone, were made for white people. And to take it back a step even further, they exist on stolen land,” Escobar-Thomas says. 

On Instagram, Hike Clerb has posted educational materials that inform followers about this history. There’s the Yosemite National Park, which was founded on the displacement of the Ahwahneechee people who were later used as entertainment for white visitors, as well as the Grandstaff Canyon, which up until 2017 was called “Negro Bill Canyon” after the mixed-race Black rancher who once resided near the area, among many other examples. Even more, Hike Clerb also shares how beaches were once segregated, with Black communities often limited to remote shores that were polluted and in hazardous locations.

“The way that these idyllic structures and spaces have formed were already on a foundation of violence and exclusion, so it’s not hard to see the connection from the way that these places were formed to the way that we participate and consume them now,” Escobar-Thomas adds.

Among their group treks, it’s not uncommon for the women behind Hike Clerb to hear racial microaggressions. “Hiking Helens,” what Escobar-Thomas calls the disgruntled white women who take issue with large groups of Black and brown people taking up space outdoors, have confronted members about their so-called “urban group.” Other times, these women have accused the collective of obstructing their communities after wrongfully assuming members parked in their neighborhoods.

“You hear these little microaggressions, and it’s like no, we deserve to take up space out here just as much as anyone else, and this is why we are doing what we are doing,” she says. “The outdoors are not just this playground for white people. We should all feel equally entitled to it.”

Despite these occurrences, Escobar-Thomas says that creating hiking experiences has overall been healing and empowering for the women who participate in them. For some, it has even been a catalyst for them to start their own individual journeys with the outdoors, with many taking solo road trips and hiking at larger parks across the Southwest.

For Escobar-Thomas, that’s exactly what Hike Clerb is about: giving women, especially those of color, the resources, education, safety tips and confidence to claim space in environments they had previously felt fearful of or excluded from and to help facilitate those experiences.

“I just really want Hike Clerb to become this destination and resource for women of color, and anyone else who is aligned in our mission, to make the outdoors more representative of the world that we live in,” she says.

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Mountain Dew Margaritas Are Apparently A Thing At Red Lobster Now?

Culture

Mountain Dew Margaritas Are Apparently A Thing At Red Lobster Now?

Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty

We’ve seen all kinds of takes on the timeless classic that is a Margarita. From frozen Margaritas to ones with cranberry juice and dashes of blue curaçao and twists of basil and ginger beer we’ve literally seen it all. Or so we thought.

Recently, Red Lobster announced that they’re doing a Mountain Dew-take on the beloved and salty tequila cocktail.

Red Lobster’s DEW-Garita promises to set you aglow.

The drink is the first official Mountain Dew cocktail and of course, it is bright lime green. While the cocktail’s recipe is being kept strictly under wraps, like everything at Red Lobster’s, it’s supposed to pair “perfectly” with Red Lobster’s iconic Cheddar Bay Biscuits.

“Red Lobster is thrilled to work with PepsiCo, not only because it has a great portfolio of brands, but specifically because of the food and beverage innovation possibilities,” Nelson Griffin,the Senior Vice President and Chief Supply Chain Officer at Red Lobster said in a statement about the drink.

Red Lobster’s DEW-Garita is due to debut at Red Lobster locations nationwide in September and by the end of 2020.

The Margarita is an iconic Mexican drink related to a drink called Rhe Daisy.

The classic Tequila sour cocktail is one of the most beloved cocktails in the world. According to Wine Enthusiast “One story claims that the drink was created in 1938, as Mexican restaurant owner Carlos (Danny) Herrera mixed it for gorgeous Ziegfeld showgirl Marjorie King. Supposedly, Tequila was the only alcohol that King would abide, so Herrera added lime juice and salt.”

To make your own classic Margarita check out this recipe below

Ingredients

  • Coarse salt
  • Lime wedge
  • 2 ounces white Tequila
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur
  • 1 ounce lime juice

Directions

Shake out coarse salt on a plate. Wet the rim of a glass by using the lime wedge. Press the rim of the glass in the plate of salt to coat. Add ice to the glass.

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice and add the rest of the ingredients. Shake well, and pour into the prepared glass over ice.

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