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10 Awkward Questions Black Latinos Are Asked Way Too Often

It’s 2016, people! And yet there are still plenty of folks who openly express shock about black Latinos’ racial, ethnic and cultural identities. Let’s face it, people can make some ignorant comments, and many still don’t seem to understand that being Latino has nothing to do with skin color. To that end, here are some things black Latinos are sick and tired of hearing:

Can I touch your hair?

But you don’t look it… Are you sure you’re Latino?

But you were born here, right? Then you must be African-American.

No quiero parecer chismoso but who is black, your dad or your mom?

Have you ever straightened your hair? You’d look so pretty.

You’re really mixed, right? Exactly how black are you?

CREDIT: GIPHY/ ABC

Get over it! While you’re at it, research the difference between culture and race.

Tienes que ser dominicana o boricua, for sure.

You can’t be both Latino and black.

Do you speak Spanish? ¿Hablas español?

You must love salsa music. You know, ¡Azucar!

‘Vampire Diaries’ Star Kat Graham Gets Teary-Eyed Talking About Feeling All Alone To Care For Her Hair In Quarantine

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‘Vampire Diaries’ Star Kat Graham Gets Teary-Eyed Talking About Feeling All Alone To Care For Her Hair In Quarantine

There’s no doubt that when the pandemic struck and it was revealed that the best way to keep healthy was to quarantine, millions of black women panicked. After all, in a world where haircare for Black women has long been a low priority in the beauty industry, so many of us are either only just learning how to take care of our hair or have been thrust into the throes of our curls thanks to not being able to see our stylists in quarantine.

“Vampire Diaries” actress Kat Graham says she knows the deal.

Speaking about her experiences with her hair, Graham admitted she has been getting her hair done professionally since she was 9 years old.

“My mom couldn’t really do my hair [growing up] so she’d just drop me off at the hair salon,” she explained in a video for Vogue before going on to share that since the start of the pandemic she’s had to learn how to do her own hair.

For the past four months, Graham explained that she’s been cautious of not using direct heat on her hair and that it’s been “really therapeutic for me to wear my hair really, really big.” The star explains that this particularly gratifying because “Afro hair is not something that Hollywood has ever necessarily embraced.”

After years of straightening her hair with chemicals and having to wear wigs for roles, Graham said she didn’t know what she was doing at the start of quarantine.

Fortunately, her hairstylist Rachel Lee gave Graham Cantu’s Avocado Leave-In Conditioner to help keep things in shape. “It’s almost like she knew I was going to be on my own. And I’ve never had to be on my own with my hair before,” Graham explained tearfully. “This was the product that really helped me figure out that my hair will work with me if I don’t give up on it.”

Graham explained that she styles her curls with Briogeo Curl Cream and uses oils like Manuka, Argan, and Black Rice. She also makes her own creation of Mustard Seed oil and Jamaican Black Castor.

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Jeimy Osorio, Reflects On The “Amazing Journey” It’s Been To Play Celia Cruz In The Hit Series

Entertainment

Jeimy Osorio, Reflects On The “Amazing Journey” It’s Been To Play Celia Cruz In The Hit Series

Jeimy Osorio is the Puerto Rican and proud Afro-Latina actress you should have on your radar. With lead roles in “Betty en New York” and “Celia,” Osorio has taken the entertainment industry by storm and reminds the world the importance of highlighting Afro-Latinx stories, and casting Afro-Latinx talent for Afro-Latinx roles. mitú caught up with the talented actress about what these experiences were like for her, the significance of portraying her characters on screen, and how they have impacted her acting and singing career.

So good to meet you, Jeimy! I hope quarantine has been treating you well, thank you for taking the time to chat with us. You play a young Celia Cruz in the series, “Celia.” Can you tell us about that journey? Was this your first major role?

Yes! Actually it was my first major role back in 2014 when we started filming. It was, if I’m not mistaken, one of the first Afro-Latina TV shows led by an Afro-Latina. It has been an honor because ever since I have been representing the Afro-Latina community even more so than before. It has been an honor for me to play this role as well because I have, in a way, kept with me the values and the tools that this character taught me about how to take care of my career and how to be as kind and understanding as Celia was when she was growing up, all of which led to her success, I would say.

You touched on this a little, but what does it mean to you to get to play such an iconic woman? I mean, we’re talking about Celia Cruz! 

It’s an amazing journey, I mean in the beginning, I knew that they were giant shoes to fill. I was thinking, “I don’t know how I am going to do this, I don’t even know if people are going to like this, I’m just going to enjoy each moment the best I can and I’m going to try to portray that joy in the camera.” And I think that worked. For me, it has still been a gift, a dream, and also like I said before, continuing the legacy of good music, message of self-love, of self-respect, of respect for others, loving your country, speaking up, using your voice, helping others through music, creating joyful music! I think that, for me, that’s the biggest one. As artists, performers, we are on the radio, we are inevitable to your ears. So whatever comes into your ears that comes from me, I want it to be joyful. I want it to be something that helps you grow, or at least touch your emotions, or helps you connect or helps you feel better. So for me to grab on to these values and tools that I would say that she left me, it’s an honor to just keep bringing these things to life with this new generation.

You’re also in “Betty en New York.” For anyone who isn’t familiar with the show, how would you describe it?

“Betty en New York” is definitely a show that you need to watch. At some point in our lives, we have all been Betty. It’s a beautiful story and it is so refreshing because it touches on the subjects that we are experiencing right now about racism, about bullying, and what social media is really doing with the minds of our kids and our teenagers. Also, the theme of self love is the most important. We’re touching all these subjects that are so deep, but the fact that we’re connecting it with comedy and that we’re going to bring this to you in your face as you laugh, it’s a magical combination. You can’t miss it and you can’t not love it. 

“Betty en New York” is a comedic series. Were there any funny moments from the set?

There were so many funny moments! Sometimes we had to stop filming because we couldn’t go on with the scene because it was so funny. We would have laugh attacks for 5-10 minutes and then you start laughing and then when you stop, I start laughing, and there was a moment where everyone started laughing and then no one could stop laughing. It was amazing. We would also sing, too, and perform in between scenes. We would make fun of each other, basically, but mainly with love. A lot of love.

Going back to “Celia,” can you tell me about one of your favorite moments on that show?

I think one of my favorite moments was when I was recording the talent show when she sang for the first time in front of her mother. When we were recording it, that sequence was so surreal for me because ten years before I was winning a singing contest at a university in front of my parents for the first time. It was just so parallel. I remember my friends were screaming my name, I was in second year and I didn’t tell my parents what the show was about, I just told them I was going to sing. They always knew I wanted to become a singer but they didn’t know my passion because I was shy! I would sing so low in my room, I didn’t want anyone to hear me. I kind of felt ashamed of it. I was still trying to figure out what was wrong with my voice, like, I felt that there was something wrong with my voice until that day. For me to play Celia singing, having her mother there and to look at the wood floor was exactly my same memory, and I was thinking  “wait a minute, I’ve lived this before.” I started crying in front of everyone. So the tears that you see in the beginning when they’re throwing her flowers in the opening of the show, that’s really me trying to stop the tears. And I remember I couldn’t stop crying for the next 15 minutes. They cut the scene, I was like “oh my god, this was me 10 years ago,” I was in shock. I couldn’t stop the tears.

A very full-circle moment, I’m sure. 

Yes, it was!

Congratulations again, on both of these shows! Are these shows available to stream anywhere? How can we watch “Celia” and “Betty en New York?”

Definitely! You can all go to Peacock.com, you’ll find more information there. You can [also] download it to your smart TV. It’s going to be under free programming and premium programming, for those that want a little extra. You can watch live programming from Telemundo and from different networks, content in both Spanish and English. I’m really happy we’re going to be representing the Latino community through Telemundo programming on the Peacock TV app.

Well, there you have it! Brb, going to binge-watch all seasons of “Betty en New York” and “Celia” on Peacock.

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