#mitúvoice

These Undocupick-Up Lines are Everything You Need to Find True Love

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Love is hard, especially if you don’t know where to start. Luckily, Undocupick-Up Lines is here. These cute lines are tailored for that undocumented crush you have, but they’re so adorable, they’ll charm anyone.

First know that scheduling is everything.

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Credit: Undocupick-Up Lines / Facebook
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Credit: Zoolander / Paramount Pictures / gifparadisecom / Tumblr

Looks like there’s a lot of time to get to know each other, mi tesoro. ?

People don’t admit it, but they love cheesy lines, so be clever and relevant.

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Credit: The Little Mermaid / Disney / junibie / Tumblr

See? ☺️

Show them that your wants are not unreasonable.

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Credit: Undocupick-Up Lines / Facebook
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*¡Quiere llorar! ¡Quiere llorar!*

Show you’re always free for them.

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You’ll be surprised how far being accommodating will get you.


READ: These Latinos Break Down the Immigration Debate AND Make It Funny

Compliment their features so they know it’s real.

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Credit: Hercules / Disney / disneyskies / Tumblr

Awwwww.

Food is always the way to someone’s heart.

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Credit: RuPaul’s Drag Race / Logo / blfuprgifs / Tumblr

But listen to Charo and flirt responsibly.

Drop a solid hint.

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Credit: Undocupick-Up Lines / Facebook
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Credit: Who Framed Roger Rabbit / Touchstone Pictures/ ghostofcheney / Tumblr

If you are clever you can do anything.

Offer support and relieve their stress.

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Credit: Undocupick-Up Lines / Facebook
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Credit: Bambi / Disney / maudit / Tumblr

Oh my, my, my. Tus labios…

Prove you will stand by their side no matter what.

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Credit: Undocupick-Up Lines / Facebook
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Sometimes all someone wants to know is that you got their back.


READ: He’s Not Your Sterotypical Latino BF, But Here’s Why It’s OK

Don’t forget, you are building a partnership not a kingdom.

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It’s OK to cry when you truly profess your feelings. ?

Lastly, make sure they know they always matter.

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Credit: Undocupick-Up Lines / Facebook
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Credit: The Mask / New Line Cinema / fuckyeahreactionface / Tumblr

Take me! I’m yours!

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My Parents Found Love in Their Interracial Marriage When the World Didn’t Always Approve

Culture

My Parents Found Love in Their Interracial Marriage When the World Didn’t Always Approve

Jose and Teresa Chavarria

Growing up, I remember placing my hand against my dad’s much darker skin. Our skin tones were always very different. People would say I looked more like my mother but I think they were just seeing the same white complexion. I didn’t have my dad’s deep brown skin or his jet black hair but I had his eyes and his way of looking at the world.

More than once while growing up, I had friends point out the difference between the two of us. While my mom had a mix of white European backgrounds, my dad had Mexican, Indigenous, and Spanish blood flowing through his veins. Her light skinned, slender form contrasted his dark and rotund one. However, I’ve never met two people who were more complimentary of each other than my parents.

In the 1980’s interracial marriage was still against societal norms in South Texas.

Jose and Teresa Chavarria

My parents married in a small church in Highlands, Texas during Holy Week. They were joined in celebration by my dad’s large Latinx family. On the other hand, my mom’s family wasn’t so eager to be there. The only reason they attended was that my dad provided their wedding clothes and personally drove them to the church. They didn’t support my mom’s decision to marry someone brown.

My dad’s family was happy to welcome my mom. Still, their welcome came with some trepidation. When they announced their engagement, my grandmother solemnly asked my father if this is what he really wanted. This was not a rejection of my mom but my grandmother’s concern about the ugliness that they would face as an interracial couple.

Officially, interracial marriage was legalized across the United States in 1967.

The decision to legalize came after the landmark Loving vs Virginia case. The Supreme Court found that the laws banning interracial marriage violated the Equal Protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

Though it was now legal, it wasn’t exactly popular at the time. South Texas was slow to adopt any kind of sweeping social change, especially if it was mandated by Washington DC. To put this into perspective, look at how desegregation was approached in the area.

Brown Vs the Board of Education reached its historic mandate in 1957. When my dad and his siblings were going to school in the late ’60s and early 70’s their school district had only just begun the process of desegregation. My father would tell me stories of being bussed to the “white schools” to fulfill the 1957 mandate. When he and my mother married in 1985, the city was still very segregated.

Though it was legalized 10 years after desegregation, interracial marriage had just as much trouble being accepted by conservative Texans.

Jose and Teresa Chavarria

Though Texas has a diverse population, outside of its major metropolitan areas, it’s still socially conservative. Texas is also part of the Evangelical Protestant Bible Belt and is home to close to ten million Catholics, Protestants, Methodists and Baptists.

The state’s religious breakdown is very relevant when we talk about interracial marriage. Historically, many religions practiced in the U.S. disavow mixed marriages. For example, the Christian Bible is often cited as a reason against the mixing of the races. However, there’s no actual text that prohibits interracial marriage. Both Deuteronomy 7:1-6 and 2 Corinthians 6:14 urge the Israelites not to intermarry with the Canaanites.

That passage in Deuteronomy reads:

“Neither shalt thou make marriages with them [Canaanites]; thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son.”

On the surface, this might look like a case against interracial marriages. Nevertheless, it isn’t as the Israelites and Canaanites were of the same ethnic group. The argument here refers to the difference in tribe and religious observations as reasons not to intermarry. Still, though there is no text to back this up, many continue to use religion to argue against mixed marriages.

Another reason why interracial marriage is opposed is something I have lots of experience with.

Jose and Teresa Chavarria

One of the social objections to interracial marriage has to do with the offspring of these marriages. Interracial children come from several different cultures. A common worry is that these children will never fully belong to any. Similarly, objectors claim that these children will be shunned by their respective cultures for being mixed.

This has been a major arguement as recently as 2009. Louisiana Justice of the Peace Keith Bardwell was exposed for refuseing to officiate interracial marriage. It was his opinion that these marriages do not last long. Additionally, he claimed he didn’t want the kids of mixed marriages to suffer unduly.

In a 2009 interview with the Associated Press, Bardwell said:

“I’m not a racist. I just don’t believe in mixing the races that way. There is a problem with both groups accepting a child from such a marriage. I think those children suffer and I won’t help put them through it.”

I can honestly say that Bardwell is absolutely wrong in his thinking.

Jose and Teresa Chavarria

A little over 35 years ago, my parents met, dated and fell in love. They had me — their oldest daughter — 13 months after they tied the knot. My little sister joined the family 18 months later. She and I have never felt unloved.

We were raised with my dad’s side of the family. As such, we grew up with quinceañeras, authentic Tex-Mex and my grandma’s telenovelas filling our childhoods. While we were lighter in complexion than my fully Latinx cousins, we were no different.

My mom didn’t have the same sort of family support my dad did. Long before their wedding, her relatives were family in name and name only. However, she loved my dad with all her heart. That included his culture.

My mom had no exposure to Latinx culture before my dad — she didn’t even have any Hispanic friends at the time. Still, she embraced my dad’s family and heritage; learning Spanish words, cooking Mexican food and teaching her children about our culture.

While my parents found acceptance from his Latinx family, not everyone was as accepting.

Jose and Teresa Chavarria

Unlike the questions I got from childhood friends, some microaggressions were meant to genuinely hurt my parents. In their neighborhood and, later, when they moved to Houston, my parents didn’t face discrimination or harassment. It was outside these safe places that they experienced bigotry.

My mom has told me stories of times when she and my dad were stared at; sneered at even. Traveling through the small towns of South Texas, my parents’ relationship was sometimes treated with hostility and, other times, like an oddity.

There is a particular story my mom has shared about this. When she and my dad were newlyweds, they went to eat at a cafeteria-type diner. Walking in, dad was immediately aware that he was the only person of color in the restaurant. My mom explained that all eyes were on them the entire time they ate. They were treated as some sort of sideshow while they were there. As my dad put it, they should have sold tickets.

This isn’t the first or the last time my parents would be made to feel abnormal because of their marriage. I remember once they had glamour shot-esque pictures taken of themselves. The photographer applied a filter that completely washed out my dad’s complexion. Totally infuriated, my dad pointed out to the photographer that they made him look like a white man instead of a Latino. It was fixed eventually but the damage was done.

There are other bolder attacks and countless microaggressions but my parents paid most of them little mind. After all, they were together and happy.

Additionally, they were welcomed by my dad’s community and that meant a lot. When my dad died 33 years after they joined in marriage, it’s my dad’s Latinx family and community who rallied to support my mom, my sister and me in our grief.

My parents’ love created that world; one where my sister and I can always find welcoming and love. All the glaring bigotry in the world can’t take that from us.

The FBI Is Investigating The Death Of A Woman And Three Children Near The Rio Grande

Things That Matter

The FBI Is Investigating The Death Of A Woman And Three Children Near The Rio Grande

The number of casualties at the border and detention camps continues to mount and each death that is reported hits the immigrant community just as hard. The death count is hard to pinpoint at immigration officials have actively hidden deaths in the past and some deaths occur as migrants attempt to cross the border. The latest casualty is being reported from southern Texas near the Rio Grande and includes children.

The bodies of four undocumented people, one 20-year-old woman, two infants, and a toddler, were found near the Rio Grande.

Credit: @fams2gether / Twitter

Sheriff Eddie Guerra of Hidalgo County tweeted that the FBI would be leading the investigation on the four casualties because the bodies were found on U.S. federal land.

“Deputies are on scene by the river SE of the Anzalduas Park in Las Paloma Wildlife Management Area where Border Patrol agents located 4 deceased bodies,” he tweeted.

Their nationalities are unclear as of now, but the names will not be released until the embassy of their country of origin is informed, followed by the family of the victims.

According to the Associated Press, the woman and children could have been dead for days.

Credit: @ajplus / Twitter

While the cause of death remains unknown, initial reports suggest they could have died of heat exhaustion which is common when traveling through that rugged terrain, especially in the summer.

Earlier in the day, Sheriff Eddie Guerra tweeted about a heat advisory in the area and warned people not to go outside.

Immigration advocates are outraged over the latest deaths, primarily because U.S. citizens attempting to prevent deaths on the border by volunteering to give migrants food and water are being prosecuted.

Credit: @RAICESTEXAS / Twitter

Private citizens and elected officials have tried to help those making the deadly journey to the U.S. While no one is pushing for open, un monitored borders, there are people fighting to make sure that those who will make the journey in desperation do not die.

The latest deaths are calling attention to those working to help migrants risking arrest and imprisonment under the Trump administration.

Scott Warren, a volunteer with No More Deaths, was recently on trial for dropping life-saving supplies along a popular route for those seeking safety in the U.S. The jury in his case could not come to a conclusion about whether or not he broke any laws. In turn, the judge declared a mistrial and the judge said there will be a conference on July 2 to decide how to proceed.

READ: Trial Begins For Scott Warren, The Volunteer Arrested For Giving Undocumented People Water, Saving Lives

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