Things That Matter

Here Are Some Of The Most Chingona Signs Latinas Carried During The Women’s March

Carmen Perez Bob Bland, Tamika Mallory and Linda Sarsour wanted women to get together to speak up for their rights and their efforts led to a worldwide movement that would result in millions of women marching all over the world. Here are some of the most powerful signs women carried during the Women’s March on January 21st.

The movement gained so much momentum that sister marches throughout the nation and around the world popped up.

Every state had at least one sister march and many countries joined in solidarity as well. The internet was flooded with reports and citizen journalists everywhere sent pictures from the marches.

Washington, D.C.

One love ?????????? @womensmarch #womensmarathon #soulsister #Alia

A photo posted by Jackie Cruz (@msjackiecruz) on


Anchorage, Alaska

Truth. #womensmarch2017 #alaska #bhavishaisgreat

A photo posted by Katie (@kathrynmabbott) on


Albuquerque, New Mexico


Asbury Park, New Jersey

#womensmarchap

A photo posted by @ripofff on


Augusta, Maine


Austin, Texas

#womansmarchaustin

A photo posted by Jackie Barry (@htownwildflowerlsd) on


Bentonville, Arkansas


Birmingham, Alabama

#womensmarchal

A photo posted by David Rikard (@davidrikard) on


Bismarck, North Dakota


Boise, Idaho

#boise #womansmarch #womansmarchboise

A photo posted by Charmaine M (@sharkskin67) on


Cincinnati, Ohio


Charleston, West Virginia

A photo posted by che ti fa mia (@asztondean) on

Chicago, Illinois

A warm mid January march with fam. #womensmarchchicago #womensmarch #siyasabencomomepongo

A photo posted by Anna Lopez (@ahhnnna) on

Denver, Colorado

ni putas, ni santas, solo mujeres

A photo posted by Loria Carnefix (@carnefixphotography) on


Des Moines, Iowa

1/21/17 Women's March #3

A photo posted by Kipp Paulsen (@paulsenkipp) on


Hagåtña, Guam

Credit: regineblee/Twitter

Helena, Montana


Honolulu, Hawaii

#womensmarchhonolulu . Boys too.

A photo posted by @drplante on


Jackson, Mississippi

Credit: jstevencarter/Twitter

Lansing, Michigan

Credit: child_sleep/Twitter

Las Vegas, Nevada

#womensmarchlasvegas #fighttrumpeveryday #chingonasunidas?????

A photo posted by Tim Buchanan (@itsadventuretim) on


Lexington, Kentucky

Credit: t_rex20_/Twitter

Los Angeles, California

Ya tu sabes. #womensmarch #dtla #loteria #NomoreDamaBS #MujerHechaYDerecha #MybasicIllustratorskills

A photo posted by Astrid Anderson (@moodtexturedesign) on


Madison, Wisconsin


Nashville, Tennessee


New Orleans, Louisiana


New York City, New York

Nina My love #tellit #makinmeproud #wishiwasthere #womensmarchnewyork #womensmarch2017

A photo posted by John Harris (@jrockfoto) on


Oakland, California

Credit: favianna/Twitter

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Credit: eyeamtruth/Twitter

Omaha, Nebraska

Credit: thedynamicdame/Twitter

Park City, Utah


Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Phoenix, Arizona

Phoenix #womensmarch #womensmarchphoenix

A photo posted by Will Hyler (@willhylerart) on


Portland, Oregon


Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Credit: passwater_amy/Twitter

Providence, Rhode Island


San Diego, California

Abuelitas ?✊?

A photo posted by Eilene Beniquez (@eilenebeniquez) on


San Francisco, California

16115031_10100779253501602_8397002195228143873_n
Facebook

Seattle, Washington


St. Paul, Minnesota

Credit: mtoven/Twitter

Topeka, Kansas

Credit: richardspuglisi/Twitter

Vieques, Puerto Rico

Credit: klcpegher/Twitter

 Mexico City, Mexico


The world showed their love and support.

The world unites in support of Women's March on Washington

"Women's right are human rights" – that's the message the Women's March on Washington wants to send to the Trump administration. Today, people around the world protested in solidarity with the Washington demonstration.

Posted by The Guardian on Saturday, January 21, 2017

Credit: theguardian/Facebook

People all over the world marched, rallied and demonstrated in solidarity.

Even Antartica participated.

Credit: thedailyedge/Twitter


READ: Here’s How Three Women, Including A Mexican-American, Came Together To Organize One Of The Biggest Marches Of Our Time

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Women Are Sharing The Scariest Parts About Being A Woman

Fierce

Women Are Sharing The Scariest Parts About Being A Woman

Halloween is supposed to be the scariest time of year, but 2020 is a reminder that there are worse things than goblins and ghouls. From Pandemics to unhinged world leaders we’ve seen it all. Recently, we started wondering about this reality and how the concept of being constantly on edge might seem “new” to certain people: men. After all, as women, we know that in parts of a world our bodies are viewed as a threat or something that’s not worth cherishing.

We dug around Reddit to find out what the scariest part of being a woman tends to be for some and found some truly heartbreaking answers.

Check them out below.

“Walking alone to your car at nightlevel.” –smelly_and_stinky

“The fact that I really have no idea which men are going to lash out at me for not reciprocating their attention to me.”- apittsburghoriginal

“Like violently lashing out? I never got that. Like if a girl doesn’t reciprocate engagement..move on. Why get all bent out of shape, it’s not going to make a woman change her mind.” – qpalz11=

“Walking alone in a strange neighborhood… in the dark… thinking of all the ways you could imagine someone kidnapping you… and then selling you… and using you…” – kolett1996

“Dealing with whatever hormones throw at you.” – jecabells

“Men. Night. Men at night.” – girlwiththegoldendog

“Walking alone from the bar to your home drunk in a skirt at night and seeing only drunk men who are stronger than you.” – d-light8

“For me it would be giving birth. I have no kids (yet)…level 2Comment deleted by user.”ch1kita

“An unwanted pregnancy. What if I have sex and use all types of birth control and i STILL get pregnant. Or what happens if I’m raped and I get the morning after pill and for some weird reason it doesn’t work. I live in a liberal state so as long as I make a decision early on, I can get an abortion. But who would I share that information with, without being judged? And what if I’m not in a state that lets me get an abortion, what would happen to me? Every day is a struggle for me, so I fear that I would end up killing myself.” – Ojitheunseen

“You could get an IUD, use normal protection like male/female condoms, and then have the pill and abortion as a fallback. Seems foolproof.” – chaoticneutral_ju

“Pregnancy denial. Like “I haven’t have my periods in two months that’s so cool” and this idea crosses your mind before telling yourself “impossible, I’ve been single for more than nine months, everything ‘s OK.” Or as they said below : having to walk near a group of men at night and not being able to make a detour since they smoke right in front of your residence door.” – chaoticneutral_ju

“I hated the pregnancy and birth part. I had the best care, but I still felt like a piece of meat. I got tired from everyone sticking their hands up my vagina. Blood works. Sonograms. I got tired and exhausted from being in pain in my nether regions. To me, the amount of pain and the potential health risks to me and the baby – it was the scariest part. Having placenta fall out of you like in some National Geographic documentary. And then you have to check out if your blood clots aren’t too large. And when they are, you back into hospital, they push on your underbelly and nibble around in your vagina, to get them out. Argh I’m done. I’m glad I have both of my kids and I’m out of those woods. Fuck that shit.”- TortillasaurusRex

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A Chilean Police Officer Is Charged With Attempted Murder After Throwing a Protestor Off Of a Bridge

Things That Matter

A Chilean Police Officer Is Charged With Attempted Murder After Throwing a Protestor Off Of a Bridge

Photo by Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Earlier this month, a police officer in Santiago, Chile was captured on video pushing a 16-year-old male demonstrator off of a bridge. The boy fell into the canal below, fracturing his wrist and suffering head trauma. He was transported to the hospital and is in stable condition.

The violent video sparked an additional wave of protests against the Carabineros–Chile’s militarized national police force that the officer was a part of.

Before the video surfaced, witnesses who were protesting voiced their anger at the police officer’s actions and demanded that he be brought to justice. Initially, a spokesperson for the Carabineros, General Enrique Monrás, denied any wrongdoing on the part of the officer, claiming that the boy “lost balance and fell”.

Monrás claimed the police force even had footage that refuted the purported events. But when the footage of the boy being pushed over the bridge went public, there was no question as to what happened.

The footage of the incident went viral in Chile, prompting a surge of demonstrations and protests in Santiago–a city already racked with civil unrest.

CLAUDIO REYES/AFP via Getty Images)

Days later, Chile opened up an investigation against the police officer, saying the officer “gave false information to the Prosecutor’s Office” and had “abandoned the victim” after throwing him off the bridge. The officer’s lawyer says he was following procedure. Nevertheless, by then the damage had been done.

Following the incident, protestors threw red die into the canal, making it look like it was running red with the metaphorical blood of protestors. The protests are part of an ongoing civil unrest that was sparked by economic inequality in Chile as well as President Sebastián Piñera’s failure to address the people’s concerns.

To make matters worse, the Piñera government has responded to the protests with excessive violence.

In the last year, Chile has been making headlines for permanently blinding protestors with rubber bullets. Protestors claim that Caballeros are deliberately shooting people in the eyes, aiming to blind them for life.

This most recent incident has simply served to bolster the protestors’ claims that they are being treated brutally by the Chilean government. “The police are violent. We can’t bear it anymore,” said a protestor named Carmen Soria to Al Jazeera News. “They’ve raped, tortured, run people over, blinded others, and now, they’re throwing people in the Mapocho river. The government doesn’t want us to protest, doesn’t want us to gather together, but they don’t care that we gather in the busses and in subways like sardines to go to work.”

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