Culture

Everything About This Burger Sounds Perfect, But It Just Doesn’t Make Sense

@foodeco / Instagram

Just when you thought avocado use reached its peak, one foodie Instagram account is giving avocados a new life… as a burger bun. No lie. @fooddeco has unleashed a whole new level of avocado obsession – and people are passionate about whether they agree with this “updated” avocado usage.

This is one of the images that has sparked a heated debate on social media.

Yeah. That’s an avocado, cut in half and made into a burger.

Immediately, people started speaking up about this new burger style. Against…

…and for.

Some can’t help but be amazed by its beauty.


#FoodGoals

And others just don’t get the appeal.


Travesty might be a harsh word for this, no?

While some people can’t wait to get their hands on this bad boy.


Because if you can eat a lettuce-wrapped burger, why not do the same with an avocado?

Others can’t image how you’d take a bite out of it.


^^Pretty valid point.

Some people are already crowning is the best thing to hit the burger world.

On the flip side, some avocado diehards are shunning this “invention.”

This is either brilliant marketing for a population that is underserved…

…or the next peas-in-guac controversy.


Only time will tell.


READ: These Photos Might Make You Change Your Mind About Avocados

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Soledad O’Brien Has Turned Her Twitter Into A Fact-Checking, Takedown Machine And We Live For It

Entertainment

Soledad O’Brien Has Turned Her Twitter Into A Fact-Checking, Takedown Machine And We Live For It

JD Lasica / Flickr

Soledad O’Brien’s journalistic career is known for delivering hard-hitting truths without playing the political game of ‘playing nice.’ She’s calling Trump a racist and she’s calling out The New York Times‘ for refraining from calling Trump a racist because “that language is a turn off to some readers.” 

O’Brien is so matter-of-fact, her show is called, “Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien.” If you’re not watching her show, her Twitter feed is as blunt as it gets. She’s savagely taking down ignorant fathers who wouldn’t know consent education if it hit them in the cojones, and they still don’t know what hit them. Here are O’Brien’s victims from this month alone:

This father who victim-blamed survivors of sexual assault, but he told his daughter to just kick the guy in the cojones so “She’s no one’s victim.”

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

After one person called O’Brien out for being “a bit harsh” given that “he at least taught her to say no,” someone named Zoe actually had to explain. “It’s not harsh,” Zoe replied. “He only taught her to say no in very specific situations that almost never happen. I guarantee he never taught her how to say no to relatives, friends, boyfriends, bosses, etc – people you can’t just hit due to freezing up, or social/financial/etc consequences.”

RIP, white men and your naive musings about a post-Trump America.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Sorry, bro, people of color are simply unfazed to see racism thrive in America. Fox & Friends will never shun Trump so long as he’s stoking the fear-baiting racist fires. O’Brien dared to say what we all couldn’t fathom–Trump will get his own show on Fox & Friends, whether he gives up the Presidency or goes full-on authoritarian.

*GASP* Could racism really be …. systemic?

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Even the methods used to combat racism are racist. O’Brien, an Afro-Latina woman entirely familiar with racism in America, is just “not shocked.” You can check someone’s privilege based on how surprised they are to learn that racism is systemic. 

We simply cannot.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Of the many excuses we hear for why folks voted and continue to support Trump, “economic anxiety” is the biggest excuse for condoning human rights violations and racism like we haven’t seen in a century. O’Brien followers lamented to have to add “fundraising while black” as a life-threatening task in America. Someone else used the GOP’s excuse used for white supremacist mass murderers: “That woman should not have access to video games. At all.”

When a former Navy SEAL trains dogs to “attack school shooters,” O’Brien sees into the future as adding dead dogs to the list of consequences of loose gun laws.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

“Anything but addressing the gun issues head-on. Dogs. Cats. Flying Squirrels,” comments one Twitter user. Someone else just perfectly encapsulated the dialogue between sensible gun reform advocates and NRA die-hards:

“People: Let’s regulate guns.
‘Merica: No! We’ll give teachers guns.
People: That would be super dangerous. Let’s regulate guns.
‘Merica: No! Backbacks that block bullets!
People: That would be very ineffective. Let’s regulate guns.
‘Merica: No! Dogs that attack shooters!”

Heads up that dogs are not immune to bullets, and shooters can just point downwards toward the dog.

O’Brien also has a special knack for mocking the not-so-newsworthiness of “news.”

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

For some reason, a video clip of Democratic Presidential Candidate Elizabeth Warren “running in Franconia, NH” went viral. “She has my vote” filled the comment thread. We have a feeling that O’Brien was likely commenting on how silly it is that watching a woman run is news.

She’s not here for people calling men brave for dealing with issues women always face.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Everyone in the comments is just shocked that this is even news. That anyone would think this man is anything but handsome. One commenter said that his wife wished he was as “ugly” as Simu Liu.

Also, RIP to the possibly-NOT-a-bot “Amazon Fulfillment Center Ambassador.”

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

@AmazonFCBilly went on to say, “Because people are wondering, yes, Frank was a valued part of the discussion! His insights into the downsides of trade unionism were very valuable!” One person genuinely asked, “If you type this do they give you a bathroom break as a reward?”

We ran the account through bot.me and they’re not a bot. It might be a “Get Out” situation, but not a bot. Maybe O’Brien snapped them out of it. Either way, we’re loving these clapbacks and truth-telling. Gracias.

READ: Soledad O’Brien Mourns Her Cuban Mom’s Death Just 40 Days After Her Father Passes Away

Here’s Why Activists And Parents Are Upset About A New Weight Loss App For Children

Culture

Here’s Why Activists And Parents Are Upset About A New Weight Loss App For Children

This week, WW, the ridiculously rebranded name for weight loss company Weight Watchers, proved that despite its new designation, the global brand is offering more of the same problematic trash to the world — this time, directed at children in particular.

On Tuesday, WW launched Kurbo, a nutrition and weight loss app for kids between the ages of 8 and 17 years old.

Not surprisingly health experts are furious about the danger it could pose to the physical and mental health of our young people.

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“You NEED to Shut. This. Down,” Whitney Fisch, a social worker, school counselor and mom of three, wrote Wednesday on Facebook. “All bodies, especially growing + developing bodies, deserve respect + the ability to grow into whatever shape they’re meant to grow to be.”

The company describes the app, which is free, as a “scientifically-proven behavior change program designed to help kids and teens age 8-17 reach a healthier weight” that was acquired from Stanford University’s Pediatric Weight Control Program. It uses a traffic light system to instruct youth on foods that they should eat and those that they should avoid. Kids are urged to eat plenty of “green light” foods, including fruits and vegetables, to be “mindful” of their portions of “yellow light” foods, like lean protein, whole grains and dairy, and to lessen their intake of “red light” foods, such as sugary drinks and “treats.” The app also encourages users to track their daily physical activity and deep breathing.

With a paid, subscription-based plan, children can also receive through the app one-on-one sessions with coaches that are supposed to be experts in nutrition, exercise, and mental health. However, the Huffington Post reports that these coaches do not need to have any credentials in health or nutrition fields; though they do go through a minimum of six to eight hours of initial training.

Eating disorder treatment experts are concerned about the impact an app like Kurbo could have on a young person’s mental health, self-esteem and eating habits.

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“While the intention of the app is to promote health and wellness, there is the risk that it could do more harm than good,” Kathryn Argento, a registered dietician with The Renfrew Center, a national network of eating disorder treatment centers for women and girls, told the Huffington Post. “Targeting kids as young as 8 years old to focus on … their bodies can lead to an intense preoccupation with food, size, shape and weight.”

Aside from the damaging impact apps like this one can have on a children’s relationship with their bodies and food, public health organizations and pediatricians also doubt the efficacy of children’s weight loss programs altogether.

“The evidence suggests that these types of tools may be helpful adjuncts to weight management, but there are few studies in pediatrics to confirm that they lead to a ‘meaningful change in their weight trajectories,’” Dr. Ihuoma Eneli, director of the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, told the news outlet.

As part of WW’s rebranding, the company and app have chosen to start focusing on overall health and wellness in addition to weight loss.

According to Gary Foster, chief scientific officer at WW, Kurbo “isn’t a weight loss app.”

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“This is an app that teaches in a game-ified, fun, engaging way what are the basics of a healthy eating pattern,” he told the Huffington Post.

But parents still worry the app could be spreading an all-too-familiar message that they are unworthy as they are and must change their physical appearance to be accepted. While young people already receive these memos from a diet-obsessed mass media, parents fear that unrealistic beauty ideals are now being pushed on impressionable children in the name of health and wellness.

In response to these apprehensions, Foster said: “I think there could be some misperception that somehow we’re saying, ‘All kids should lose weight, you’re not OK as you are.’ What we’re saying to kids who are trying to achieve a healthier weight — kids and families — is that this is a reasonable, sensible way to do it.”

But despite this alleged kid-friendly wellness mission, Kurbo’s website sends another message.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B03-BhhA4V5/

Its landing page shows young people’s “success stories,” and they’re celebrating weight loss, not how often they meditate or how many ounces of water they drink daily.

“There’s no way that these kids don’t realize that the app is supposed to help them lose weight,” Ginny Jones, an eating disorder recovery activist, said. “No matter how hard it tries to market itself as a wellness company, WW is about weight loss. Kids are way smarter than we think they are, and every ‘big kid’ who [has been] put on a weight loss program knew exactly what their parents were trying to do.”

Read: She Shared Stories Of Being Fat-Shamed At The Doctor And Fear Of Wearing A Two-Piece Then, Jessica Torres Accidentally Built One Of The Biggest Body Positive Communities

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